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Re: parse an environment file

 
 
Chris Angelico
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-01-2012
On Tue, Oct 2, 2012 at 12:37 AM, Jason Friedman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Is there a reason to use that format, rather than using Python
>> notation? I've at times made config files that simply get imported.
>> Instead of a dictionary, you'd have a module object:
>>
>>
>> # config.py
>> VAR1='foo'
>> VAR2='bar'
>> VAR3=VAR1+VAR2
>>

> There is a reason: /path/to/export_file exists for Bash scripts, too,
> and I do not think I could get Bash to read config.py in the format
> stated above. I want to maintain only one file.


(Responding on-list and hoping it was merely oversight that had that
email come to me personally)

Ah, fair enough. Well, since you're using the full range of bash
functionality, the only viable way to parse it is with bash itself.
I'd recommend going with the version you have above:

> * * * * * . /path/to/export_file && /path/to/script.py


Under what circumstances is this not an option? That'd be the next
thing to consider.

Alternatively, you may want to consider making your own config file
format. If you consciously restrict yourself to a severe subset of
bash functionality, you could easily parse it in Python - for
instance, always look for "export %s=%s" with simple strings for the
variable name and value.

ChrisA
 
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88888 Dihedral
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-01-2012
On Monday, October 1, 2012 10:42:02 PM UTC+8, Chris Angelico wrote:
> On Tue, Oct 2, 2012 at 12:37 AM, Jason Friedman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >> Is there a reason to use that format, rather than using Python

>
> >> notation? I've at times made config files that simply get imported.

>
> >> Instead of a dictionary, you'd have a module object:

>
> >>

>
> >>

>
> >> # config.py

>
> >> VAR1='foo'

>
> >> VAR2='bar'

>
> >> VAR3=VAR1+VAR2

>
> >>

>
> > There is a reason: /path/to/export_file exists for Bash scripts, too,

>
> > and I do not think I could get Bash to read config.py in the format

>
> > stated above. I want to maintain only one file.

>
>
>
> (Responding on-list and hoping it was merely oversight that had that
>
> email come to me personally)
>
>
>
> Ah, fair enough. Well, since you're using the full range of bash
>
> functionality, the only viable way to parse it is with bash itself.
>
> I'd recommend going with the version you have above:
>
>
>
> > * * * * * . /path/to/export_file && /path/to/script.py

>
>
>
> Under what circumstances is this not an option? That'd be the next
>
> thing to consider.
>
>
>
> Alternatively, you may want to consider making your own config file
>
> format. If you consciously restrict yourself to a severe subset of
>
> bash functionality, you could easily parse it in Python - for
>
> instance, always look for "export %s=%s" with simple strings for the
>
> variable name and value.
>
>
>
> ChrisA


I think one can ues some decorators to wrap OS or platform
dependent functions.

I am sure someone did that long time ago as the iron python
wrapped dot-net.
 
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88888 Dihedral
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-01-2012
On Monday, October 1, 2012 10:42:02 PM UTC+8, Chris Angelico wrote:
> On Tue, Oct 2, 2012 at 12:37 AM, Jason Friedman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >> Is there a reason to use that format, rather than using Python

>
> >> notation? I've at times made config files that simply get imported.

>
> >> Instead of a dictionary, you'd have a module object:

>
> >>

>
> >>

>
> >> # config.py

>
> >> VAR1='foo'

>
> >> VAR2='bar'

>
> >> VAR3=VAR1+VAR2

>
> >>

>
> > There is a reason: /path/to/export_file exists for Bash scripts, too,

>
> > and I do not think I could get Bash to read config.py in the format

>
> > stated above. I want to maintain only one file.

>
>
>
> (Responding on-list and hoping it was merely oversight that had that
>
> email come to me personally)
>
>
>
> Ah, fair enough. Well, since you're using the full range of bash
>
> functionality, the only viable way to parse it is with bash itself.
>
> I'd recommend going with the version you have above:
>
>
>
> > * * * * * . /path/to/export_file && /path/to/script.py

>
>
>
> Under what circumstances is this not an option? That'd be the next
>
> thing to consider.
>
>
>
> Alternatively, you may want to consider making your own config file
>
> format. If you consciously restrict yourself to a severe subset of
>
> bash functionality, you could easily parse it in Python - for
>
> instance, always look for "export %s=%s" with simple strings for the
>
> variable name and value.
>
>
>
> ChrisA


I think one can ues some decorators to wrap OS or platform
dependent functions.

I am sure someone did that long time ago as the iron python
wrapped dot-net.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
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