Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Programming > Java > Recommended books to learn Java

Reply
Thread Tools

Recommended books to learn Java

 
 
Dan Kalish
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-28-2012
I'm an experienced programmer and would like to learn Java, in order to make myself more marketable.

In particular, during the period 1968-1978 I worked years as a Scientific Progammer, primarily programming in Fortran IV (66?). Since then, I have occasionally programmed in SNOBOL, PASCAL, BASIC, Plato, Fortran 95 and C++. Thus, I don't need a beginner's book.

Any recommendations on books for learning Java?

Dan
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Robert Klemme
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-28-2012
On 28.09.2012 16:52, Dan Kalish wrote:
> I'm an experienced programmer and would like to learn Java, in order
> to make myself more marketable.
>
> In particular, during the period 1968-1978 I worked years as a
> Scientific Progammer, primarily programming in Fortran IV (66?).
> Since then, I have occasionally programmed in SNOBOL, PASCAL, BASIC,
> Plato, Fortran 95 and C++. Thus, I don't need a beginner's book.
>
> Any recommendations on books for learning Java?


I'd first look at web resources, for example Sun's Java Tutorials.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/

They cover most basic language features and also most important parts of
the standard library (collections, IO). I'd say the language itself is
fairly easy to grok - getting to know the standard library usually takes
a bit more time if only because of the volume.

Kind regards

robert

--
remember.guy do |as, often| as.you_can - without end
http://blog.rubybestpractices.com/
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Arne Vajh°j
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-28-2012
On 9/28/2012 10:52 AM, Dan Kalish wrote:
> I'm an experienced programmer and would like to learn Java, in order
> to make myself more marketable.
>
> In particular, during the period 1968-1978 I worked years as a
> Scientific Progammer, primarily programming in Fortran IV (66?).
> Since then, I have occasionally programmed in SNOBOL, PASCAL, BASIC,
> Plato, Fortran 95 and C++. Thus, I don't need a beginner's book.


Wrox's "Professional Xxxx" is often good for developers that know
other languages.

You could try read reviews of "Professional Java JDK 6 Edition"
(it looks as if the 7 edition is not out yet) and see if it sounds
as a book for you.

There are also a large number of resources available on the
internet.

Arne

 
Reply With Quote
 
Jim Gibson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-28-2012
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Dan
Kalish <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> I'm an experienced programmer and would like to learn Java, in order to make
> myself more marketable.
>
> In particular, during the period 1968-1978 I worked years as a Scientific
> Progammer, primarily programming in Fortran IV (66?). Since then, I have
> occasionally programmed in SNOBOL, PASCAL, BASIC, Plato, Fortran 95 and C++.
> Thus, I don't need a beginner's book.
>
> Any recommendations on books for learning Java?


This is my favorite Java book:

<http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596008734.do>

backed up by the online API references:

<http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/>

<http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/>

--
Jim Gibson
 
Reply With Quote
 
Roedy Green
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-28-2012
On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 07:52:12 -0700 (PDT), Dan Kalish
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone
who said :

>Any recommendations on books for learning Java?


see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/gettingstarted.html

I would see if someone has written a Java for C++ programmers.
They look superficially very alike, but assuming they are the same
under the covers really gets in the way.

SNOBOL, I have not seen that in almost 50 years.
--
Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products http://mindprod.com
The iPhone 5 is a low end Rolex.


 
Reply With Quote
 
Lew
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-28-2012
Robert Klemme wrote:
> Dan Kalish wrote:
>> I'm an experienced programmer and would like to learn Java, in order
>> to make myself more marketable.

>
>> In particular, during the period 1968-1978 I worked years as a
>> Scientific Progammer, primarily programming in Fortran IV (66?).
>> Since then, I have occasionally programmed in SNOBOL, PASCAL, BASIC,

> Plato, Fortran 95 and C++. Thus, I don't need a beginner's book.


Yes, you do. Maybe not a beginning programmer's book, but definitely a beginning
Java programmer's book.

I have over thirteen years' professional experience developing Java and I still
learn something new every time I read the tutorials.

>> Any recommendations on books for learning Java?


/Effective Java/ by Joshua Bloch is a must-have.

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/ja...va-136174.html

So is /Java Concurrency in Practice/ by Brian Goetz, et al.

http://www.javaconcurrencyinpractice.com/

> I'd first look at web resources, for example Sun's Java Tutorials.
> http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/
>
> They cover most basic language features and also most important parts of
> the standard library (collections, IO). I'd say the language itself is
> fairly easy to grok - getting to know the standard library usually takes
> a bit more time if only because of the volume.


But it's well worth the effort.

Start with the java.lang, java.io and java.util packages.

The API docs are a constant source of knowledge and inspiration.
http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/

--
Lew
 
Reply With Quote
 
Gene Wirchenko
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-28-2012
On Fri, 28 Sep 2012 12:26:59 -0700 (PDT), Lew <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Robert Klemme wrote:
>> Dan Kalish wrote:
>>> I'm an experienced programmer and would like to learn Java, in order
>>> to make myself more marketable.

>>
>>> In particular, during the period 1968-1978 I worked years as a
>>> Scientific Progammer, primarily programming in Fortran IV (66?).
>>> Since then, I have occasionally programmed in SNOBOL, PASCAL, BASIC,

>> Plato, Fortran 95 and C++. Thus, I don't need a beginner's book.

>
>Yes, you do. Maybe not a beginning programmer's book, but definitely a beginning
>Java programmer's book.
>
>I have over thirteen years' professional experience developing Java and I still
>learn something new every time I read the tutorials.


I second this. Little quirks of a language that are at the
beginning level will be assumed to be known at higher levels. You
could end up blindsiding yourself. And review is good.

[snip]

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko
 
Reply With Quote
 
glen herrmannsfeldt
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-28-2012
Dan Kalish <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> I'm an experienced programmer and would like to learn Java,
> in order to make myself more marketable.


> In particular, during the period 1968-1978 I worked years as
> a Scientific Progammer, primarily programming in Fortran IV (66?).
> Since then, I have occasionally programmed in SNOBOL, PASCAL,
> BASIC, Plato, Fortran 95 and C++.
> Thus, I don't need a beginner's book.


You should have nearby the official Java language reference manual.

That, and some sample programs to work on should be enough,
though your Java will likely look like on of the other languages.

I more elementary book would explain many things that Java
programmers are assumed to know, but that aren't in the LRM.

You might look at: http://webster.cs.washington.edu:8080/practiceit/

I have not seen anything like it for any other language.

-- glen

 
Reply With Quote
 
Arne Vajh°j
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-29-2012
On 9/28/2012 3:26 PM, Lew wrote:
>> Dan Kalish wrote:
>>> I'm an experienced programmer and would like to learn Java, in order
>>> to make myself more marketable.

>>
>>> In particular, during the period 1968-1978 I worked years as a
>>> Scientific Progammer, primarily programming in Fortran IV (66?).
>>> Since then, I have occasionally programmed in SNOBOL, PASCAL, BASIC,

>> Plato, Fortran 95 and C++. Thus, I don't need a beginner's book.

>
> Yes, you do. Maybe not a beginning programmer's book, but definitely a beginning
> Java programmer's book.


And that is an important distinction.

There is a huge difference between a beginners book in Java that spend
hundreds of pages teaching programming and OOP and a beginners book in
Java that assumes the readers knows about those.

Wrox typical has two books for each language. Beginning Xxxx that really
starts from scratch and Professional Xxxx that assumes you know the
basics and focus in the Xxxx specifics.

I don't know Professional Java, but their Professional C# is pretty
good for people that knows Java and/or C++ and need to learn C#.

>>> Any recommendations on books for learning Java?

>
> /Effective Java/ by Joshua Bloch is a must-have.
>
> http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/ja...va-136174.html
>
> So is /Java Concurrency in Practice/ by Brian Goetz, et al.
>
> http://www.javaconcurrencyinpractice.com/


I would put Bloch in phase 2 and Goetz in phase 3 of the
learning process.

Arne


 
Reply With Quote
 
Arne Vajh°j
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-29-2012
On 9/28/2012 6:32 PM, glen herrmannsfeldt wrote:
> Dan Kalish <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> I'm an experienced programmer and would like to learn Java,
>> in order to make myself more marketable.

>
>> In particular, during the period 1968-1978 I worked years as
>> a Scientific Progammer, primarily programming in Fortran IV (66?).
>> Since then, I have occasionally programmed in SNOBOL, PASCAL,
>> BASIC, Plato, Fortran 95 and C++.
>> Thus, I don't need a beginner's book.

>
> You should have nearby the official Java language reference manual.
>
> That, and some sample programs to work on should be enough,
> though your Java will likely look like on of the other languages.
>
> I more elementary book would explain many things that Java
> programmers are assumed to know, but that aren't in the LRM.


I assume you mean JLS or?

A big portion of people will not learn efficiently from JLS and
need something that start simpler and build up in knowledge.

Arne


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Recommended Java Design Pattern Books/Websites? Aaron Smith Java 4 08-28-2007 05:40 PM
Recommended book to learn about digital images / photoshop Nick Digital Photography 4 10-10-2005 06:38 AM
Books, books, books: best reference texts for Verilog and VHDL HDL Book Seller VHDL 0 12-01-2004 02:26 AM
Books, Books, Books... C++ 3 09-19-2004 10:11 PM
recommended java books Jeremy Watts Java 10 09-08-2004 04:02 AM



Advertisments