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Re: [SI] Proposed shoot in

 
 
watchmaker
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      06-23-2012
SI Committee wrote:
> As the vacation travel season begins (in the northern hemisphere anyway)
> we propose that the next shoot-in be geographically related.
>
> To whit we further propose that this be a geo-referenced shoot-in due
> 2012.09.09 when most should be done with their wanderings.
>
> For that, all photos should contain geotags so that when they are opened
> the location where they were shot can be shown as well. We'd use a web
> photo service (Panoramio for example) to display the photos (as well as
> pbase). With Panoramio the photos will (in a week or so after
> uploading) also appear on Google Maps/Earth [1].
>
> Some of you may not travel this summer vacation, but geotagging can be
> done as close as home or as far as you roam. See below for some info on
> geotagging.
>
> What say you?
> =============
>
>

<Technical explanation snipped>

I think this is as good an idea as any technologically-oriented mandate,
like wide angle (I don't know if there's ever been a wide angle mandate,
it's just an analogy).

Since I shoot film the point is moot for me, but I'm first cousin to Ned
Ludd anyway. Sure I could buck 40 years of experience and actually carry
a notebook to write down where I am when a given shot is taken, but that
would mean carrying a notebook and remembering to write _anything_ down,
something I've never done. (Well, except for making development notes on
my 8x10 film holders, but lets not go there.)

But I don't see any problem with the idea -- those who want to
participate will, those who don't won't. It might be interesting to see
who does participate and maybe some sort of census on who used
"automatic GPS" and who had to use "Post-processing GPS". If nothing
else it would be a snapshot of how useful and/or widely adopted GPS
tagging is right now. Like any technology it is how you use it that matters.

[I prefer to repair watches at least 50 years old, and steadfastly
refuse to repair quartz watches. The cheapest quartz watch is about
1,000 times more accurate than the most expensive Patek Phillippe
mechanical watch...]
 
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Charles E. Hardwidge
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-23-2012

"watchmaker" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:js3cqk$7m9$(E-Mail Removed)...

> [I prefer to repair watches at least 50 years old, and steadfastly refuse
> to repair quartz watches. The cheapest quartz watch is about 1,000 times
> more accurate than the most expensive Patek Phillippe mechanical watch...]


http://www.watchmatchmaker.com/1_men...er-speaks.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co-axial_escapement

I remember watching an interview with George Daniels (?) You couldn't help
but be caught up by his enthusiasm for his craft and the accuracy of his
watches in comparison to modern quartz watches. His invention of the
co-axial escapement was genius and had a mesmerising and sensual beauty to
its movement.

--
Charles E. Hardwidge

 
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watchmaker
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-24-2012
Charles E. Hardwidge wrote:
>
> "watchmaker" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:js3cqk$7m9$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>> [I prefer to repair watches at least 50 years old, and steadfastly refuse
>> to repair quartz watches. The cheapest quartz watch is about 1,000 times
>> more accurate than the most expensive Patek Phillippe mechanical
>> watch...]

>
> http://www.watchmatchmaker.com/1_men...er-speaks.html
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co-axial_escapement
>
> I remember watching an interview with George Daniels (?) You couldn't help
> but be caught up by his enthusiasm for his craft and the accuracy of his
> watches in comparison to modern quartz watches. His invention of the
> co-axial escapement was genius and had a mesmerising and sensual beauty to
> its movement.
>


George Daniels was one of the most gifted watchmakers of the 20th
Century. I would compare him to Abraham-Louis Breguet for his sheer
talent and discipline in the design and fabrication of watches and
mechanisms which increase accuracy. His book, "Watchmaking", George
Daniels, Sotheby's, London, 1981 ISBN 0-85667-150-9 (2011 edition ISBN
0-85667-704-3) is a revelation even to experienced watchmakers of the
depth and breadth of his abilities and knowledge.

His seminal book on Breguet, "The Art of Breguet", George Daniels,
Sotheby Parke Bernet, London, 1974 ISBN 0-85667-004-9, is an homage to
the most brilliant watchmaker of the 18th Century, who invented most of
what we now take for granted in contemporary watchmaking.

Unfortunately, physics being what it is, a watch with a 4 or 5 Hertz
balance wheel is never going to compete in accuracy with a quartz
crystal vibrating at 32,768 Hz. And stepper motors timed by said crystal
are more accurate than any gear train and escapement, sadly. Still,
there are lots of interesting mechanical movements still being made at
most price points

 
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tony cooper
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-24-2012
On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 21:08:37 -0400, watchmaker
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Charles E. Hardwidge wrote:
>>
>> "watchmaker" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:js3cqk$7m9$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>>> [I prefer to repair watches at least 50 years old, and steadfastly refuse
>>> to repair quartz watches. The cheapest quartz watch is about 1,000 times
>>> more accurate than the most expensive Patek Phillippe mechanical
>>> watch...]

>>
>> http://www.watchmatchmaker.com/1_men...er-speaks.html
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co-axial_escapement
>>
>> I remember watching an interview with George Daniels (?) You couldn't help
>> but be caught up by his enthusiasm for his craft and the accuracy of his
>> watches in comparison to modern quartz watches. His invention of the
>> co-axial escapement was genius and had a mesmerising and sensual beauty to
>> its movement.
>>

>
>George Daniels was one of the most gifted watchmakers of the 20th
>Century. I would compare him to Abraham-Louis Breguet for his sheer
>talent and discipline in the design and fabrication of watches and
>mechanisms which increase accuracy. His book, "Watchmaking", George
>Daniels, Sotheby's, London, 1981 ISBN 0-85667-150-9 (2011 edition ISBN
>0-85667-704-3) is a revelation even to experienced watchmakers of the
>depth and breadth of his abilities and knowledge.
>
>His seminal book on Breguet, "The Art of Breguet", George Daniels,
>Sotheby Parke Bernet, London, 1974 ISBN 0-85667-004-9, is an homage to
>the most brilliant watchmaker of the 18th Century, who invented most of
>what we now take for granted in contemporary watchmaking.
>
>Unfortunately, physics being what it is, a watch with a 4 or 5 Hertz
>balance wheel is never going to compete in accuracy with a quartz
>crystal vibrating at 32,768 Hz. And stepper motors timed by said crystal
>are more accurate than any gear train and escapement, sadly. Still,
>there are lots of interesting mechanical movements still being made at
>most price points


I like mechanical watches as photographic subjects:

http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...3-17-34-XL.jpg

This Howard still works and keeps pretty good time:

http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...6_sQors-XL.jpg

http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...8_SESaW-XL.jpg
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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watchmaker
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-25-2012
tony cooper wrote:
> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 21:08:37 -0400, watchmaker
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Charles E. Hardwidge wrote:
>>>
>>> "watchmaker" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:js3cqk$7m9$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>
>>>> [I prefer to repair watches at least 50 years old, and steadfastly refuse
>>>> to repair quartz watches. The cheapest quartz watch is about 1,000 times
>>>> more accurate than the most expensive Patek Phillippe mechanical
>>>> watch...]
>>>
>>> http://www.watchmatchmaker.com/1_men...er-speaks.html
>>>
>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co-axial_escapement
>>>
>>> I remember watching an interview with George Daniels (?) You couldn't help
>>> but be caught up by his enthusiasm for his craft and the accuracy of his
>>> watches in comparison to modern quartz watches. His invention of the
>>> co-axial escapement was genius and had a mesmerising and sensual beauty to
>>> its movement.
>>>

>>
>> George Daniels was one of the most gifted watchmakers of the 20th
>> Century. I would compare him to Abraham-Louis Breguet for his sheer
>> talent and discipline in the design and fabrication of watches and
>> mechanisms which increase accuracy. His book, "Watchmaking", George
>> Daniels, Sotheby's, London, 1981 ISBN 0-85667-150-9 (2011 edition ISBN
>> 0-85667-704-3) is a revelation even to experienced watchmakers of the
>> depth and breadth of his abilities and knowledge.
>>
>> His seminal book on Breguet, "The Art of Breguet", George Daniels,
>> Sotheby Parke Bernet, London, 1974 ISBN 0-85667-004-9, is an homage to
>> the most brilliant watchmaker of the 18th Century, who invented most of
>> what we now take for granted in contemporary watchmaking.
>>
>> Unfortunately, physics being what it is, a watch with a 4 or 5 Hertz
>> balance wheel is never going to compete in accuracy with a quartz
>> crystal vibrating at 32,768 Hz. And stepper motors timed by said crystal
>> are more accurate than any gear train and escapement, sadly. Still,
>> there are lots of interesting mechanical movements still being made at
>> most price points

>
> I like mechanical watches as photographic subjects:
>
> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...3-17-34-XL.jpg
>
> This Howard still works and keeps pretty good time:
>
> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...6_sQors-XL.jpg
>
> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...8_SESaW-XL.jpg
>



tony cooper wrote:
> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 21:08:37 -0400, watchmaker
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Charles E. Hardwidge wrote:
>>>
>>> "watchmaker" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:js3cqk$7m9$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>
>>>> [I prefer to repair watches at least 50 years old, and steadfastly refuse
>>>> to repair quartz watches. The cheapest quartz watch is about 1,000 times
>>>> more accurate than the most expensive Patek Phillippe mechanical
>>>> watch...]
>>>
>>> http://www.watchmatchmaker.com/1_men...er-speaks.html
>>>
>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co-axial_escapement
>>>
>>> I remember watching an interview with George Daniels (?) You couldn't help
>>> but be caught up by his enthusiasm for his craft and the accuracy of his
>>> watches in comparison to modern quartz watches. His invention of the
>>> co-axial escapement was genius and had a mesmerising and sensual beauty to
>>> its movement.
>>>

>>
>> George Daniels was one of the most gifted watchmakers of the 20th
>> Century. I would compare him to Abraham-Louis Breguet for his sheer
>> talent and discipline in the design and fabrication of watches and
>> mechanisms which increase accuracy. His book, "Watchmaking", George
>> Daniels, Sotheby's, London, 1981 ISBN 0-85667-150-9 (2011 edition ISBN
>> 0-85667-704-3) is a revelation even to experienced watchmakers of the
>> depth and breadth of his abilities and knowledge.
>>
>> His seminal book on Breguet, "The Art of Breguet", George Daniels,
>> Sotheby Parke Bernet, London, 1974 ISBN 0-85667-004-9, is an homage to
>> the most brilliant watchmaker of the 18th Century, who invented most of
>> what we now take for granted in contemporary watchmaking.
>>
>> Unfortunately, physics being what it is, a watch with a 4 or 5 Hertz
>> balance wheel is never going to compete in accuracy with a quartz
>> crystal vibrating at 32,768 Hz. And stepper motors timed by said crystal
>> are more accurate than any gear train and escapement, sadly. Still,
>> there are lots of interesting mechanical movements still being made at
>> most price points

>
> I like mechanical watches as photographic subjects:
>
> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...3-17-34-XL.jpg
>
> This Howard still works and keeps pretty good time:
>
> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...6_sQors-XL.jpg
>
> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...8_SESaW-XL.jpg
>



Beautiful photos, Tony! That Howard is right on the cusp of 1920 and
1920 (serial number 1,39x,xxx). Very high grade triple-bridge movement
with 17 jewels and temperature and position tested. The dial is in
beautiful shap. By eye it looks like a 12-size (American sizing system)
and probably has a 25-year gold-filled case (unless it's solid gold),
possibly a Wadsworth case.

Howards are the underdogs of the watch collecting world -- many many
excellent examples available for less than half the price of equivalent
Illinois, Waltham, or Elgin.

It looks like it is in very good shape. However, even modern lubricants
break down over time. If you find that the watch is gaining time
significantly you might consider taking it to a competent watchmaker for
a cleaning and lubrication. It shouldn't cost very much and is an
excellent precaution. Once every 5 to 10 years for a watch not used very
much is the recommended interval.
 
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tony cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-25-2012
On Sun, 24 Jun 2012 21:21:09 -0400, watchmaker
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>tony cooper wrote:
>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 21:08:37 -0400, watchmaker
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> Charles E. Hardwidge wrote:
>>>>
>>>> "watchmaker" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:js3cqk$7m9$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>
>>>>> [I prefer to repair watches at least 50 years old, and steadfastly refuse
>>>>> to repair quartz watches. The cheapest quartz watch is about 1,000 times
>>>>> more accurate than the most expensive Patek Phillippe mechanical
>>>>> watch...]
>>>>
>>>> http://www.watchmatchmaker.com/1_men...er-speaks.html
>>>>
>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co-axial_escapement
>>>>
>>>> I remember watching an interview with George Daniels (?) You couldn't help
>>>> but be caught up by his enthusiasm for his craft and the accuracy of his
>>>> watches in comparison to modern quartz watches. His invention of the
>>>> co-axial escapement was genius and had a mesmerising and sensual beauty to
>>>> its movement.
>>>>
>>>
>>> George Daniels was one of the most gifted watchmakers of the 20th
>>> Century. I would compare him to Abraham-Louis Breguet for his sheer
>>> talent and discipline in the design and fabrication of watches and
>>> mechanisms which increase accuracy. His book, "Watchmaking", George
>>> Daniels, Sotheby's, London, 1981 ISBN 0-85667-150-9 (2011 edition ISBN
>>> 0-85667-704-3) is a revelation even to experienced watchmakers of the
>>> depth and breadth of his abilities and knowledge.
>>>
>>> His seminal book on Breguet, "The Art of Breguet", George Daniels,
>>> Sotheby Parke Bernet, London, 1974 ISBN 0-85667-004-9, is an homage to
>>> the most brilliant watchmaker of the 18th Century, who invented most of
>>> what we now take for granted in contemporary watchmaking.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately, physics being what it is, a watch with a 4 or 5 Hertz
>>> balance wheel is never going to compete in accuracy with a quartz
>>> crystal vibrating at 32,768 Hz. And stepper motors timed by said crystal
>>> are more accurate than any gear train and escapement, sadly. Still,
>>> there are lots of interesting mechanical movements still being made at
>>> most price points

>>
>> I like mechanical watches as photographic subjects:
>>
>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...3-17-34-XL.jpg
>>
>> This Howard still works and keeps pretty good time:
>>
>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...6_sQors-XL.jpg
>>
>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...8_SESaW-XL.jpg
>>

>
>
>tony cooper wrote:
>> On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 21:08:37 -0400, watchmaker
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> Charles E. Hardwidge wrote:
>>>>
>>>> "watchmaker" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:js3cqk$7m9$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>
>>>>> [I prefer to repair watches at least 50 years old, and steadfastly refuse
>>>>> to repair quartz watches. The cheapest quartz watch is about 1,000 times
>>>>> more accurate than the most expensive Patek Phillippe mechanical
>>>>> watch...]
>>>>
>>>> http://www.watchmatchmaker.com/1_men...er-speaks.html
>>>>
>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Co-axial_escapement
>>>>
>>>> I remember watching an interview with George Daniels (?) You couldn't help
>>>> but be caught up by his enthusiasm for his craft and the accuracy of his
>>>> watches in comparison to modern quartz watches. His invention of the
>>>> co-axial escapement was genius and had a mesmerising and sensual beauty to
>>>> its movement.
>>>>
>>>
>>> George Daniels was one of the most gifted watchmakers of the 20th
>>> Century. I would compare him to Abraham-Louis Breguet for his sheer
>>> talent and discipline in the design and fabrication of watches and
>>> mechanisms which increase accuracy. His book, "Watchmaking", George
>>> Daniels, Sotheby's, London, 1981 ISBN 0-85667-150-9 (2011 edition ISBN
>>> 0-85667-704-3) is a revelation even to experienced watchmakers of the
>>> depth and breadth of his abilities and knowledge.
>>>
>>> His seminal book on Breguet, "The Art of Breguet", George Daniels,
>>> Sotheby Parke Bernet, London, 1974 ISBN 0-85667-004-9, is an homage to
>>> the most brilliant watchmaker of the 18th Century, who invented most of
>>> what we now take for granted in contemporary watchmaking.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately, physics being what it is, a watch with a 4 or 5 Hertz
>>> balance wheel is never going to compete in accuracy with a quartz
>>> crystal vibrating at 32,768 Hz. And stepper motors timed by said crystal
>>> are more accurate than any gear train and escapement, sadly. Still,
>>> there are lots of interesting mechanical movements still being made at
>>> most price points

>>
>> I like mechanical watches as photographic subjects:
>>
>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...3-17-34-XL.jpg
>>
>> This Howard still works and keeps pretty good time:
>>
>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...6_sQors-XL.jpg
>>
>> http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Other/...8_SESaW-XL.jpg
>>

>
>
>Beautiful photos, Tony! That Howard is right on the cusp of 1920 and
>1920 (serial number 1,39x,xxx). Very high grade triple-bridge movement
>with 17 jewels and temperature and position tested. The dial is in
>beautiful shap. By eye it looks like a 12-size (American sizing system)
>and probably has a 25-year gold-filled case (unless it's solid gold),
>possibly a Wadsworth case.
>
>Howards are the underdogs of the watch collecting world -- many many
>excellent examples available for less than half the price of equivalent
>Illinois, Waltham, or Elgin.
>
>It looks like it is in very good shape. However, even modern lubricants
>break down over time. If you find that the watch is gaining time
>significantly you might consider taking it to a competent watchmaker for
>a cleaning and lubrication. It shouldn't cost very much and is an
>excellent precaution. Once every 5 to 10 years for a watch not used very
>much is the recommended interval.


The Howard is in a Keystone case, (s/n 1588730 marked Extra 0) that is
probably gold-filled since there is no k designation mark. It's
either a 12 or a 14...I can't measure the works accurately enough to
tell 41.48 from 39.78.




--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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