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Re: Food - late seating

 
 
otter
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-20-2012
On Jun 19, 8:54*pm, PeterN <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On 6/18/2012 11:16 PM, otter wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Jun 18, 6:28 pm, PeterN<(E-Mail Removed)> *wrote:
> >> On 6/18/2012 1:12 AM, otter wrote:

>
> >>> On Jun 11, 4:20 pm, SI Committee<(E-Mail Removed)>
> >>> wrote:
> >>>>http://www.pbase.com/shootin/food

>
> >>>> More to follow: - Tony Cooper
> >>>> * * * * * * * * * *- Bowser (later this week, hesays).

>
> >>>> So hold off the comments for a few days...

>
> >>>> --
> >>>> The Committee
> >>>> Notice: New e-meil address for shootin submissions is
> >>>> * * * * * * shootinphotos AHT gmail DAHT com
> >>>> and will be effective for the "Pairs, triplets ..." round.

>
> >>>> (re-posted after finger goof...)

>
> >>> Sent two more Food pics, to go with the other one.
> >>> FOOD_Otter_2: Nut-crusted salmon, at Legal Seafood, Boston, Ma
> >>> FOOD_Otter_3: Pepperoni, mushroom, and garlic-spinach pizza, at
> >>> Lombardi's, New York City

>
> >>> If you can add these to the gallery, great. *Otherwise, I will posta
> >>> link in a few days.

>
> >>> I need to go work out now.

>
> >> How didja like Lombardi's?

>
> >> --
> >> Peter

>
> > Lombardi's is good, and has nice historical appeal, but a bit
> > touristy. * My favorite is still Regina Pizza in Boston North End.

>
> Haven't been there.
> We went to Seattle and tried the Space Needle restaurant. We figured it
> would be a tourist trap, but were pleasantly surprised to find the food
> and prices much better than expected.
>
> --
> Peter


Ah, yes the Space Needle. Having grown up in the Seattle area, I've
been there a few times (many years ago). I remember the food was
pretty good, but not inexpensive - but you have to expect to pay
something for the view.

To expand on Lombardi's, I did think the pizza was good. However,
there is a coal-fired pizza place a few miles from my house in Texas
that turns out a similar product. Lombardi's was not much better than
that. I'd say they are pretty close to equivalent. By "touristy", I
just mean there are a lot of obvious tourists (like me) flocking to
the place, and there's adverts for T shirts at each table, etc. It's
not the restaurant's fault that tourists go there, but I did get that
vibe from the place.

On the other hand, there's a much different vibe at Regina Pizza in
Boston. It is much more like a local bar/hangout with great food.
They use a gas oven, which is not as hot as coal, but the crust is
great anyway. The key difference is the tastiness of the toppings.
Simply the best pizza I've ever had, and that includes lots of pizza
places in the San Francisco area I used to frequent when living
there. An internet aquaintence recommended Regina to me a few years
ago, and I am forever in his debt. This guy is quite a flaky net-
kook, but he was spot-on about Regina.

There are a few more NYC pizza places I need to try before passing
final judgement, and a friend of mine swears by Chicago pizza. Some
day, maybe I'll get to go to Italy and try the real thing. But so
far, Regina is at the top of my list.
 
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otter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-20-2012
On Jun 20, 9:41*am, otter <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Jun 19, 8:54*pm, PeterN <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 6/18/2012 11:16 PM, otter wrote:

>
> > > On Jun 18, 6:28 pm, PeterN<(E-Mail Removed)> *wrote:
> > >> On 6/18/2012 1:12 AM, otter wrote:

>
> > >>> On Jun 11, 4:20 pm, SI Committee<(E-Mail Removed)>
> > >>> wrote:
> > >>>>http://www.pbase.com/shootin/food

>
> > >>>> More to follow: - Tony Cooper
> > >>>> * * * * * * * * * *- Bowser (later this week, he says).

>
> > >>>> So hold off the comments for a few days...

>
> > >>>> --
> > >>>> The Committee
> > >>>> Notice: New e-meil address for shootin submissions is
> > >>>> * * * * * * shootinphotos AHT gmail DAHT com
> > >>>> and will be effective for the "Pairs, triplets ..." round.

>
> > >>>> (re-posted after finger goof...)

>
> > >>> Sent two more Food pics, to go with the other one.
> > >>> FOOD_Otter_2: Nut-crusted salmon, at Legal Seafood, Boston, Ma
> > >>> FOOD_Otter_3: Pepperoni, mushroom, and garlic-spinach pizza, at
> > >>> Lombardi's, New York City

>
> > >>> If you can add these to the gallery, great. *Otherwise, I will post a
> > >>> link in a few days.

>
> > >>> I need to go work out now.

>
> > >> How didja like Lombardi's?

>
> > >> --
> > >> Peter

>
> > > Lombardi's is good, and has nice historical appeal, but a bit
> > > touristy. * My favorite is still Regina Pizza in Boston North End.

>
> > Haven't been there.
> > We went to Seattle and tried the Space Needle restaurant. We figured it
> > would be a tourist trap, but were pleasantly surprised to find the food
> > and prices much better than expected.

>
> > --
> > Peter

>
> Ah, yes the Space Needle. *Having grown up in the Seattle area, I've
> been there a few times (many years ago). *I remember the food was
> pretty good, but not inexpensive - but you have to expect to pay
> something for the view.
>
> To expand on Lombardi's, I did think the pizza was good. *However,
> there is a coal-fired pizza place a few miles from my house in Texas
> that turns out a similar product. *Lombardi's was not much better than
> that. *I'd say they are pretty close to equivalent. *By "touristy", I
> just mean there are a lot of obvious tourists (like me) flocking to
> the place, and there's adverts for T shirts at each table, etc. *It's
> not the restaurant's fault that tourists go there, but I did get that
> vibe from the place.
>
> On the other hand, there's a much different vibe at Regina Pizza in
> Boston. *It is much more like a local bar/hangout with great food.
> They use a gas oven, which is not as hot as coal, but the crust is
> great anyway. *The key difference is the tastiness of the toppings.
> Simply the best pizza I've ever had, and that includes lots of pizza
> places in the San Francisco area I used to frequent when living
> there. *An internet aquaintence recommended Regina to me a few years
> ago, and I am forever in his debt. *This guy is quite a flaky net-
> kook, but he was spot-on about Regina.
>
> There are a few more NYC pizza places I need to try before passing
> final judgement, and a friend of mine swears by Chicago pizza. *Some
> day, maybe I'll get to go to Italy and try the real thing. *But so
> far, Regina is at the top of my list.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/billkes...3676/lightbox/
 
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tony cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-20-2012
On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 07:41:19 -0700 (PDT), otter
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>There are a few more NYC pizza places I need to try before passing
>final judgement, and a friend of mine swears by Chicago pizza. Some
>day, maybe I'll get to go to Italy and try the real thing. But so
>far, Regina is at the top of my list.


I lived in Chicago and went to Uno's and Due's many, many times. I
was never fond of the Chicago "deep dish" pizza and ordered, instead,
thin crust pizza. (The franchise Uno's are a travesty)

The "best" pizza is what you start out on. Mentally, that first good
pizza is your taste bud's benchmark for good pizza the rest of your
life. My first pizza was eaten at the Italian Gardens in Indianapolis
(the restaurant is now long gone)...thin crust and not greasy on top.
I've never found pizza as good as that again.

People who say that water in dough (New Yorkers, mainly) makes the
difference are only comparing other pizza to what they are used to. I
never found New York pizza to be very good. Too greasy.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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otter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-20-2012
On Jun 20, 9:51*am, tony cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 07:41:19 -0700 (PDT), otter
>
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >There are a few more NYC pizza places I need to try before passing
> >final judgement, and a friend of mine swears by Chicago pizza. *Some
> >day, maybe I'll get to go to Italy and try the real thing. *But so
> >far, Regina is at the top of my list.

>
> I lived in Chicago and went to Uno's and Due's many, many times. *I
> was never fond of the Chicago "deep dish" pizza and ordered, instead,
> thin crust pizza. (The franchise Uno's are a travesty)


I've been to a few Uno's franchise locations in several cities, but
not the original (which I take it is in Chicago?). I thought the
pizza was pretty tasty, but I wouldn't put it in the outstanding
category.

 
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PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-20-2012
On 6/20/2012 10:51 AM, tony cooper wrote:
> On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 07:41:19 -0700 (PDT), otter
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> There are a few more NYC pizza places I need to try before passing
>> final judgement, and a friend of mine swears by Chicago pizza. Some
>> day, maybe I'll get to go to Italy and try the real thing. But so
>> far, Regina is at the top of my list.

>
> I lived in Chicago and went to Uno's and Due's many, many times. I
> was never fond of the Chicago "deep dish" pizza and ordered, instead,
> thin crust pizza. (The franchise Uno's are a travesty)
>
> The "best" pizza is what you start out on. Mentally, that first good
> pizza is your taste bud's benchmark for good pizza the rest of your
> life. My first pizza was eaten at the Italian Gardens in Indianapolis
> (the restaurant is now long gone)...thin crust and not greasy on top.
> I've never found pizza as good as that again.
>
> People who say that water in dough (New Yorkers, mainly) makes the
> difference are only comparing other pizza to what they are used to. I
> never found New York pizza to be very good. Too greasy.
>
>


Depends on where you go. A good coal fire pizza, made with the proper
toppings is hard to beat. Some chains are starting to use the concept,
Anthony's comes to mind. However, to my taste putting a salad on a pizza
is a travesty.

--
Peter
 
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PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-20-2012
On 6/20/2012 10:47 AM, otter wrote:
> On Jun 20, 9:41 am, otter<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> On Jun 19, 8:54 pm, PeterN<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On 6/18/2012 11:16 PM, otter wrote:

>>
>>>> On Jun 18, 6:28 pm, PeterN<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>> On 6/18/2012 1:12 AM, otter wrote:

>>
>>>>>> On Jun 11, 4:20 pm, SI Committee<(E-Mail Removed)>
>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>> http://www.pbase.com/shootin/food

>>
>>>>>>> More to follow: - Tony Cooper
>>>>>>> - Bowser (later this week, he says).

>>
>>>>>>> So hold off the comments for a few days...

>>
>>>>>>> --
>>>>>>> The Committee
>>>>>>> Notice: New e-meil address for shootin submissions is
>>>>>>> shootinphotos AHT gmail DAHT com
>>>>>>> and will be effective for the "Pairs, triplets ..." round.

>>
>>>>>>> (re-posted after finger goof...)

>>
>>>>>> Sent two more Food pics, to go with the other one.
>>>>>> FOOD_Otter_2: Nut-crusted salmon, at Legal Seafood, Boston, Ma
>>>>>> FOOD_Otter_3: Pepperoni, mushroom, and garlic-spinach pizza, at
>>>>>> Lombardi's, New York City

>>
>>>>>> If you can add these to the gallery, great. Otherwise, I will post a
>>>>>> link in a few days.

>>
>>>>>> I need to go work out now.

>>
>>>>> How didja like Lombardi's?

>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> Peter

>>
>>>> Lombardi's is good, and has nice historical appeal, but a bit
>>>> touristy. My favorite is still Regina Pizza in Boston North End.

>>
>>> Haven't been there.
>>> We went to Seattle and tried the Space Needle restaurant. We figured it
>>> would be a tourist trap, but were pleasantly surprised to find the food
>>> and prices much better than expected.

>>
>>> --
>>> Peter

>>
>> Ah, yes the Space Needle. Having grown up in the Seattle area, I've
>> been there a few times (many years ago). I remember the food was
>> pretty good, but not inexpensive - but you have to expect to pay
>> something for the view.
>>
>> To expand on Lombardi's, I did think the pizza was good. However,
>> there is a coal-fired pizza place a few miles from my house in Texas
>> that turns out a similar product. Lombardi's was not much better than
>> that. I'd say they are pretty close to equivalent. By "touristy", I
>> just mean there are a lot of obvious tourists (like me) flocking to
>> the place, and there's adverts for T shirts at each table, etc. It's
>> not the restaurant's fault that tourists go there, but I did get that
>> vibe from the place.
>>
>> On the other hand, there's a much different vibe at Regina Pizza in
>> Boston. It is much more like a local bar/hangout with great food.
>> They use a gas oven, which is not as hot as coal, but the crust is
>> great anyway. The key difference is the tastiness of the toppings.
>> Simply the best pizza I've ever had, and that includes lots of pizza
>> places in the San Francisco area I used to frequent when living
>> there. An internet aquaintence recommended Regina to me a few years
>> ago, and I am forever in his debt. This guy is quite a flaky net-
>> kook, but he was spot-on about Regina.
>>
>> There are a few more NYC pizza places I need to try before passing
>> final judgement, and a friend of mine swears by Chicago pizza. Some
>> day, maybe I'll get to go to Italy and try the real thing. But so
>> far, Regina is at the top of my list.

>
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/billkes...3676/lightbox/



Will try it next time we're in the area. Bean town is only about a six
hour drive.

--
Peter
 
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tony cooper
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-20-2012
On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 08:07:51 -0700 (PDT), otter
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Jun 20, 9:51*am, tony cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 07:41:19 -0700 (PDT), otter
>>
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> >There are a few more NYC pizza places I need to try before passing
>> >final judgement, and a friend of mine swears by Chicago pizza. *Some
>> >day, maybe I'll get to go to Italy and try the real thing. *But so
>> >far, Regina is at the top of my list.

>>
>> I lived in Chicago and went to Uno's and Due's many, many times. *I
>> was never fond of the Chicago "deep dish" pizza and ordered, instead,
>> thin crust pizza. (The franchise Uno's are a travesty)

>
>I've been to a few Uno's franchise locations in several cities, but
>not the original (which I take it is in Chicago?). I thought the
>pizza was pretty tasty, but I wouldn't put it in the outstanding
>category.


That goes back to the "what you are used to" premise of mine. I
started going to Uno's and Due's (both owned by the same people) in
the 1960s and became accustomed to that pizza. They opened a Uno's
franchise down here a few years ago, and the pizza just isn't the same
as in Chicago.

If I hadn't have had an expectation of what Uno's pizza would be like,
I might have liked it.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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tony cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-20-2012
On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 11:09:48 -0400, PeterN
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On 6/20/2012 10:51 AM, tony cooper wrote:
>> On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 07:41:19 -0700 (PDT), otter
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> There are a few more NYC pizza places I need to try before passing
>>> final judgement, and a friend of mine swears by Chicago pizza. Some
>>> day, maybe I'll get to go to Italy and try the real thing. But so
>>> far, Regina is at the top of my list.

>>
>> I lived in Chicago and went to Uno's and Due's many, many times. I
>> was never fond of the Chicago "deep dish" pizza and ordered, instead,
>> thin crust pizza. (The franchise Uno's are a travesty)
>>
>> The "best" pizza is what you start out on. Mentally, that first good
>> pizza is your taste bud's benchmark for good pizza the rest of your
>> life. My first pizza was eaten at the Italian Gardens in Indianapolis
>> (the restaurant is now long gone)...thin crust and not greasy on top.
>> I've never found pizza as good as that again.
>>
>> People who say that water in dough (New Yorkers, mainly) makes the
>> difference are only comparing other pizza to what they are used to. I
>> never found New York pizza to be very good. Too greasy.
>>
>>

>
>Depends on where you go. A good coal fire pizza, made with the proper
>toppings is hard to beat. Some chains are starting to use the concept,
>Anthony's comes to mind. However, to my taste putting a salad on a pizza
>is a travesty.


I don't know of any places down here that use coal, but there are
several wood fire pizza places. I think the more uniform temperature
electric oven does better.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-20-2012
On 6/20/2012 2:49 PM, tony cooper wrote:
> On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 11:09:48 -0400, PeterN
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> On 6/20/2012 10:51 AM, tony cooper wrote:
>>> On Wed, 20 Jun 2012 07:41:19 -0700 (PDT), otter
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>>> There are a few more NYC pizza places I need to try before passing
>>>> final judgement, and a friend of mine swears by Chicago pizza. Some
>>>> day, maybe I'll get to go to Italy and try the real thing. But so
>>>> far, Regina is at the top of my list.
>>>
>>> I lived in Chicago and went to Uno's and Due's many, many times. I
>>> was never fond of the Chicago "deep dish" pizza and ordered, instead,
>>> thin crust pizza. (The franchise Uno's are a travesty)
>>>
>>> The "best" pizza is what you start out on. Mentally, that first good
>>> pizza is your taste bud's benchmark for good pizza the rest of your
>>> life. My first pizza was eaten at the Italian Gardens in Indianapolis
>>> (the restaurant is now long gone)...thin crust and not greasy on top.
>>> I've never found pizza as good as that again.
>>>
>>> People who say that water in dough (New Yorkers, mainly) makes the
>>> difference are only comparing other pizza to what they are used to. I
>>> never found New York pizza to be very good. Too greasy.
>>>
>>>

>>
>> Depends on where you go. A good coal fire pizza, made with the proper
>> toppings is hard to beat. Some chains are starting to use the concept,
>> Anthony's comes to mind. However, to my taste putting a salad on a pizza
>> is a travesty.

>
> I don't know of any places down here that use coal, but there are
> several wood fire pizza places. I think the more uniform temperature
> electric oven does better.
>
>


<http://anthonyscoalfiredpizza.com/locations>

I like the more traditional toppings.

--
Peter
 
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PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-20-2012
On 6/20/2012 4:05 PM, Alan Browne wrote:
> On 2012-06-20 14:49 , tony cooper wrote:
>
>> I don't know of any places down here that use coal, but there are
>> several wood fire pizza places. I think the more uniform temperature
>> electric oven does better.

>
> We have a lot of wood fire pizza places. Always good.
>


Wood fired is good; gas fired is good. Assuming the toppings are of
equal quality, I prefer a thin coal fired pie. To my taste the texture
is better because the quick cooking makes it crispier and the cheese
melts differently.

Some like deep dish, I don't dislike deep dish, I simply have a preference.

YMMV

--
Peter
 
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