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Overexposuring analog film?

 
 
Sandman
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      05-28-2012
The lab that developed my film gave me a tip on analog shooting. He
said that I should overexpose my shots by setting the camera ISO
setting to a step lower than than actual film. So my T-Max 400 film
should be set to ISO 200, and my Portra 160 should be set to ISO 80.

Looking at my pics, some are underexposed (which in most cases
actually makes them look quite interesting).

Do you guys have any comments on this?

--
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Martin Brown
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      05-28-2012
On 28/05/2012 08:59, Sandman wrote:
> The lab that developed my film gave me a tip on analog shooting. He
> said that I should overexpose my shots by setting the camera ISO
> setting to a step lower than than actual film. So my T-Max 400 film
> should be set to ISO 200, and my Portra 160 should be set to ISO 80.
>
> Looking at my pics, some are underexposed (which in most cases
> actually makes them look quite interesting).


Worth trying out bracketing exposures on a couple of ladnsacpes with
clouds in to get a feel for how things behave on film. Easier and
cheaper to do digitally of course but slightly different behaviour.
>
> Do you guys have any comments on this?


I'd be inclined to over expose most analogue films by a half a stop as
their nominal rated ASA always seemed to be a tadge optimistic.

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Martin Brown
 
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Sandman
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      05-28-2012
In article <B8Hwr.1517$(E-Mail Removed)>,
Martin Brown <|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote:

> On 28/05/2012 08:59, Sandman wrote:
> > The lab that developed my film gave me a tip on analog shooting. He
> > said that I should overexpose my shots by setting the camera ISO
> > setting to a step lower than than actual film. So my T-Max 400 film
> > should be set to ISO 200, and my Portra 160 should be set to ISO 80.
> >
> > Looking at my pics, some are underexposed (which in most cases
> > actually makes them look quite interesting).

>
> Worth trying out bracketing exposures on a couple of ladnsacpes with
> clouds in to get a feel for how things behave on film. Easier and
> cheaper to do digitally of course but slightly different behaviour.
> >
> > Do you guys have any comments on this?

>
> I'd be inclined to over expose most analogue films by a half a stop as
> their nominal rated ASA always seemed to be a tadge optimistic.


Ok, half-stop vs one stop. Thanks for the suggestion, I'll try both


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Sandman[.net]
 
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Rob
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      05-28-2012
On 28/05/2012 7:23 PM, Sandman wrote:
> In article<B8Hwr.1517$(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Martin Brown<|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> On 28/05/2012 08:59, Sandman wrote:
>>> The lab that developed my film gave me a tip on analog shooting. He
>>> said that I should overexpose my shots by setting the camera ISO
>>> setting to a step lower than than actual film. So my T-Max 400 film
>>> should be set to ISO 200, and my Portra 160 should be set to ISO 80.
>>>
>>> Looking at my pics, some are underexposed (which in most cases
>>> actually makes them look quite interesting).

>>
>> Worth trying out bracketing exposures on a couple of ladnsacpes with
>> clouds in to get a feel for how things behave on film. Easier and
>> cheaper to do digitally of course but slightly different behaviour.
>>>
>>> Do you guys have any comments on this?

>>
>> I'd be inclined to over expose most analogue films by a half a stop as
>> their nominal rated ASA always seemed to be a tadge optimistic.

>
> Ok, half-stop vs one stop. Thanks for the suggestion, I'll try both
>
>

you will not see 1/2 stop - better to go 1 stop.
 
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Rob
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      05-28-2012
On 28/05/2012 5:59 PM, Sandman wrote:
> The lab that developed my film gave me a tip on analog shooting. He
> said that I should overexpose my shots by setting the camera ISO
> setting to a step lower than than actual film. So my T-Max 400 film
> should be set to ISO 200, and my Portra 160 should be set to ISO 80.
>
> Looking at my pics, some are underexposed (which in most cases
> actually makes them look quite interesting).
>
> Do you guys have any comments on this?
>


Its to compensate for them under processing your film.

Most labs use a replenishment system to "top up" there chemicals to the
correct concentration which keeps them "fresh". Usually labs just go
merrily along and seldom check the developer with a test strip during
the normal days production. Its only the startup period when its checked
and the film density measured. So if your film is developed in the
afternoon the strength could be under which will under develop the film.

Just as a check compare the edge strip of the film which has been
correctly exposed for a reference as to the correct development.

 
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Sandman
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      05-28-2012
In article <jpvjgh$84k$(E-Mail Removed)>, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

> On 28/05/2012 5:59 PM, Sandman wrote:
> > The lab that developed my film gave me a tip on analog shooting. He
> > said that I should overexpose my shots by setting the camera ISO
> > setting to a step lower than than actual film. So my T-Max 400 film
> > should be set to ISO 200, and my Portra 160 should be set to ISO 80.
> >
> > Looking at my pics, some are underexposed (which in most cases
> > actually makes them look quite interesting).
> >
> > Do you guys have any comments on this?
> >

>
> Its to compensate for them under processing your film.
>
> Most labs use a replenishment system to "top up" there chemicals to the
> correct concentration which keeps them "fresh". Usually labs just go
> merrily along and seldom check the developer with a test strip during
> the normal days production. Its only the startup period when its checked
> and the film density measured. So if your film is developed in the
> afternoon the strength could be under which will under develop the film.
>
> Just as a check compare the edge strip of the film which has been
> correctly exposed for a reference as to the correct development.


Ah, good info. Thanks


--
Sandman[.net]
 
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nospam
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-28-2012
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Sandman
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> The lab that developed my film gave me a tip on analog shooting. He
> said that I should overexpose my shots by setting the camera ISO
> setting to a step lower than than actual film. So my T-Max 400 film
> should be set to ISO 200, and my Portra 160 should be set to ISO 80.
>
> Looking at my pics, some are underexposed (which in most cases
> actually makes them look quite interesting).
>
> Do you guys have any comments on this?


when i shot film, i'd usually set the iso to half of what it said on
the box for print film. don't do that for slide film.
 
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Rob
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      05-29-2012
On 29/05/2012 2:01 AM, Jeff wrote:
> Sandman<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:mr-B2EDBA.12300028052012
> @News.Individual.NET:
>
>> In article<jpvjgh$84k$(E-Mail Removed)>, Rob<(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On 28/05/2012 5:59 PM, Sandman wrote:
>>>> The lab that developed my film gave me a tip on analog shooting. He
>>>> said that I should overexpose my shots by setting the camera ISO
>>>> setting to a step lower than than actual film. So my T-Max 400 film
>>>> should be set to ISO 200, and my Portra 160 should be set to ISO 80.
>>>>
>>>> Looking at my pics, some are underexposed (which in most cases
>>>> actually makes them look quite interesting).
>>>>
>>>> Do you guys have any comments on this?
>>>>
>>>
>>> Its to compensate for them under processing your film.
>>>
>>> Most labs use a replenishment system to "top up" there chemicals to the
>>> correct concentration which keeps them "fresh". Usually labs just go
>>> merrily along and seldom check the developer with a test strip during
>>> the normal days production. Its only the startup period when its checked
>>> and the film density measured. So if your film is developed in the
>>> afternoon the strength could be under which will under develop the film.
>>>
>>> Just as a check compare the edge strip of the film which has been
>>> correctly exposed for a reference as to the correct development.

>>
>> Ah, good info. Thanks
>>
>>

> Misinformation.
> A processor is _not_ run all day and then "topped up" at the end.


I didn't say that. have a re read


There is
> a metered flow of replenishment chemicals during the time film is moving
> through the machine. A test strip run during production will not be
> significantly different from one run at the beginning of the day (which
> would represent chemical conditions at the end of the previous day).
>
> Comparing the unexposed edge strip will not reveal anything unless it was
> discolored by severe overdevelopment. The base color is built in at
> manufacture and can naturally vary between film types and batches of the
> same type.
>


You missed the point.
 
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Rob
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      05-29-2012
On 29/05/2012 2:22 AM, nospam wrote:
> In article<(E-Mail Removed)>, Sandman
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> The lab that developed my film gave me a tip on analog shooting. He
>> said that I should overexpose my shots by setting the camera ISO
>> setting to a step lower than than actual film. So my T-Max 400 film
>> should be set to ISO 200, and my Portra 160 should be set to ISO 80.
>>
>> Looking at my pics, some are underexposed (which in most cases
>> actually makes them look quite interesting).
>>
>> Do you guys have any comments on this?

>
> when i shot film, i'd usually set the iso to half of what it said on
> the box for print film. don't do that for slide film.


Thats like a stop.

Slide film you should bracket it its critical.
 
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PeterN
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      05-29-2012
On 5/28/2012 10:25 PM, Rob wrote:
> On 29/05/2012 2:22 AM, nospam wrote:
>> In article<(E-Mail Removed)>, Sandman
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> The lab that developed my film gave me a tip on analog shooting. He
>>> said that I should overexpose my shots by setting the camera ISO
>>> setting to a step lower than than actual film. So my T-Max 400 film
>>> should be set to ISO 200, and my Portra 160 should be set to ISO 80.
>>>
>>> Looking at my pics, some are underexposed (which in most cases
>>> actually makes them look quite interesting).
>>>
>>> Do you guys have any comments on this?

>>
>> when i shot film, i'd usually set the iso to half of what it said on
>> the box for print film. don't do that for slide film.

>
> Thats like a stop.
>
> Slide film you should bracket it its critical.


Yes! Underexposure can give you more color saturation.
But, I agree with you on bracketing.

For digital I try to push the histogram as far to the right as I can,
without blowing the highlights.
--
Peter
 
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