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How associate two HashMaps

 
 
Ricardo Nuno
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      05-08-2012
What do I need to associate a value, from one hashMap to a key from a
new HashMap

thanks
 
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Stefan Ram
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      05-08-2012
Ricardo Nuno <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>What do I need to associate a value, from one hashMap to a key from a
>new HashMap


It is hard to parse this sentence with the comma.

»To associate a value to a key« is a little bit vague.

With the same vagueness, the answer is:
map.put( k, map_.get( k_ )),
map.put( map_.get( k_ ), v ),
map.get( k, map_.get( k_ )),
map.get( map_.get( k_ ), v ), or something.

 
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javax.swing.JSnarker
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      05-08-2012
On 08/05/2012 12:24 AM, Stefan Ram wrote:
> Ricardo Nuno<(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>> What do I need to associate a value, from one hashMap to a key from a
>> new HashMap

>
> It is hard to parse this sentence with the comma.
>
> »To associate a value to a key« is a little bit vague.


My guess is that he wants a bidirectional map. For that you'd need a
custom class delegating to two internal HashMap instances. Something like

public class BidiMap<K,V> extends AbstractMap<K,V> {
private Map<K,V> map1, map2;
private BidiMap<V,K> reversed;

public BidiMap () {
map1 = new HashMap<K,V>();
map2 = new HashMap<K,V>();
reversed = new BidiMap<K,V>(map2, map1, this);
}

private BidiMap (Map<K,V> map1, Map<K,V> map2, BidiMap<V,K> reversed) {
this.map1 = map1; this.map2 = map2; this.reversed = reversed;
}

private BidiMap<V,K> getReversedMap () {
return reversed;
}

/* Map methods go here. View methods delegate to map1. Modifying
methods operate on both maps, but reverse key and value when
modifying map2. Also, if a value is already in map2, looks
it up in map2 to find the corresponding key and removes
that key from map1 before adding the new mappings to both maps.
*/
}

Changes to the reversed map will be reflected in the original and vice
versa.

--
public final class JSnarker
extends JComponent
A JSnarker is an NNTP-aware component that asynchronously provides
snarky output when the Ego.needsPuncturing() event is fired in cljp.
 
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Roedy Green
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      05-08-2012
On Mon, 7 May 2012 21:07:56 -0700 (PDT), Ricardo Nuno
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said
:

>What do I need to associate a value, from one hashMap to a key from a
>new HashMap


Think about this first without the generics. You want a HashMap with
a key and a value. What sort of thing is the key? What is the value?

see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/hashmap.html
--
Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
http://mindprod.com
Programmers love to create simplified replacements for HTML.
They forget that the simplest language is the one you
already know. They also forget that their simple little
markup language will bit by bit become even more convoluted
and complicated than HTML because of the unplanned way it grows.
..
 
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Lew
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      05-08-2012
javax.swing.JSnarker wrote:
> Stefan Ram wrote:
>> Ricardo Nuno writes:
>>> What do I need to associate a value, from one hashMap to a key from a
>>> new HashMap

>>
>> It is hard to parse this sentence with the comma.
>>
>> »To associate a value to a key« is a little bit vague.

>
> My guess is that he wants a bidirectional map. For that you'd need a
> custom class delegating to two internal HashMap instances. Something like
>
> public class BidiMap<K,V> extends AbstractMap<K,V> {


In Apache Commons Collections 'BidiMap' is an interface with a double handful
of implementing classes:
<http://commons.apache.org/collections/api-release/org/apache/commons/collections/BidiMap.html>

> private Map<K,V> map1, map2;
> private BidiMap<V,K> reversed;
>
> public BidiMap () {
> map1 = new HashMap<K,V>();
> map2 = new HashMap<K,V>();
> reversed = new BidiMap<K,V>(map2, map1, this);
> }
>
> private BidiMap (Map<K,V> map1, Map<K,V> map2, BidiMap<V,K> reversed) {
> this.map1 = map1; this.map2 = map2; this.reversed = reversed;
> }
>
> private BidiMap<V,K> getReversedMap () {
> return reversed;
> }
>
> /* Map methods go here. View methods delegate to map1. Modifying
> methods operate on both maps, but reverse key and value when
> modifying map2. Also, if a value is already in map2, looks
> it up in map2 to find the corresponding key and removes
> that key from map1 before adding the new mappings to both maps.
> */
> }
>
> Changes to the reversed map will be reflected in the original and vice
> versa.


JSnarker's example is a good one for understanding the mechanics of the
bidirectional map. The Apache Commons libraries are the go-to source for
most convenience types not in the standard API.

If you need a different kind of association, well, there are all kinds of ways
to do that, as Stefan pointed out.

Another possibility is that you're looking for a way to associate more thanone value with the same key. There are a number of ways to do that:

Here's one (not tried or even compiled here, so might need tweaking):

public interface Pair<L, R>
{
L getLeft();
R getRight();
}

public class BasePair<L, R> implements Pair<L, R>
{
private final L left;
private final R right;
public BasePair(L left, R right)
{
this.left = left;
this.right = right;
}

public L getLeft() { return left; }
public R getRight() { return right; }
}

public class MultiAssociator<K, L, R>
{
private final Map<K, Pair<L, R>> associator = new HashMap<>();

public Pair<L, R> put(K key, Pair<L, R> pair)
{
if (key == null || pair == null)
{
throw new IllegalArgumentException("Argument cannot be null");
}
return associator.put(key, pair);
}

public Pair<L, R> put(K key, L left, R right)
{
return associator.put(key, new Pair<>(left, right));
}

public Pair<L, R> put(K key, L left)
{
if (key == null)
{
throw new IllegalArgumentException("Argument cannot be null");
}
Pair<L, R> value = associator.get(key);
Pair<L, R> repla = value == null? new Pair<>(left, null)
: new Pair<>(left, value.getRight());
return associator.put(key, repla);
}

public Pair<L, R> put(K key, R right)
{
if (key == null)
{
throw new IllegalArgumentException("Argument cannot be null");
}
Pair<L, R> value = associator.get(key);
Pair<L, R> repla = value == null? new Pair(null, right)
: new Pair(value.getLeft(), right);
return associator.put(key, repla);
}

public Pair<L, R> get(K key)
{
return associator.get(key);
}
}

--
Lew

 
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