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Robert Coe
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      04-20-2012
I bought a new Canon 7D in late February (effectively giving up on the
possibility of an affordable 5D3 a few days before my doubts were confirmed),
and it arrived with a piece of visible black goop buried somewhere in the
viewfinder. So I left it for a warranty repair at Canon's Jamesburg NJ shop on
my way home from visiting my daughter in Philadelphia this week. I dropped it
off just after noon on Tuesday, and it was sitting on my desk chair when I
arrived at work at 7:45 Thursday morning. So if you thought that that level of
service was gone with the wind, well ... maybe not. (Full disclosure: I'm a
CPS Silver member, but extra fast service isn't an advertised benefit at that
lowly level.)

One of the things we did in Philadelphia (besides ogling Betsy and Shep's new
house) was take a trip out to Amish country, because my 6-year-old grandson is
a dedicated fan of the Pennsylvania Railroad Museum, Yes, that's "Amish", with
an "A", as in this month's Shoot-In. However, my wife got by far the better
pictures (out the train window on the Strasburg RR), so she'll be in the SI
this month even if I decide to sit it out. :^|

One negative I discovered this morning was that the Canon shop set my camera
back to factory settings. What saved me was that I had recorded all my
autofocus microadjustments in a spreadsheet and could reset them without
taking new test pictures. I recommend the practice. Too bad there's no way
(that I know of) to easily capture and restore the rest of the settings.

Bob
 
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RichA
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      04-21-2012
On Apr 20, 6:19*pm, Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I bought a new Canon 7D in late February (effectively giving up on the
> possibility of an affordable 5D3 a few days before my doubts were confirmed),
> and it arrived with a piece of visible black goop buried somewhere in the
> viewfinder. So I left it for a warranty repair at Canon's Jamesburg NJ shop on
> my way home from visiting my daughter in Philadelphia this week. I dropped it
> off just after noon on Tuesday, and it was sitting on my desk chair when I
> arrived at work at 7:45 Thursday morning. So if you thought that that level of
> service was gone with the wind, well ... maybe not. (Full disclosure: I'ma
> CPS Silver member, but extra fast service isn't an advertised benefit at that
> lowly level.)
>
> One of the things we did in Philadelphia (besides ogling Betsy and Shep'snew
> house) was take a trip out to Amish country, because my 6-year-old grandson is
> a dedicated fan of the Pennsylvania Railroad Museum, Yes, that's "Amish",with
> an "A", as in this month's Shoot-In. However, my wife got by far the better
> pictures (out the train window on the Strasburg RR), so she'll be in the SI
> this month even if I decide to sit it out. *:^|
>
> One negative I discovered this morning was that the Canon shop set my camera
> back to factory settings. What saved me was that I had recorded all my
> autofocus microadjustments in a spreadsheet and could reset them without
> taking new test pictures. I recommend the practice. Too bad there's no way
> (that I know of) to easily capture and restore the rest of the settings.
>
> Bob


And people wonder why DSLR's are on the way out.
 
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Robert Coe
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      04-22-2012
On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 14:59:51 -0700 (PDT), RichA <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: On Apr 20, 6:19*pm, Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: > I bought a new Canon 7D in late February (effectively giving up on the
: > possibility of an affordable 5D3 a few days before my doubts were confirmed),
: > and it arrived with a piece of visible black goop buried somewhere in the
: > viewfinder. So I left it for a warranty repair at Canon's Jamesburg NJ shop on
: > my way home from visiting my daughter in Philadelphia this week. I dropped it
: > off just after noon on Tuesday, and it was sitting on my desk chair when I
: > arrived at work at 7:45 Thursday morning. So if you thought that that level of
: > service was gone with the wind, well ... maybe not. (Full disclosure: I'm a
: > CPS Silver member, but extra fast service isn't an advertised benefit at that
: > lowly level.)
: >
: > One of the things we did in Philadelphia (besides ogling Betsy and Shep's new
: > house) was take a trip out to Amish country, because my 6-year-old grandson is
: > a dedicated fan of the Pennsylvania Railroad Museum, Yes, that's "Amish", with
: > an "A", as in this month's Shoot-In. However, my wife got by far the better
: > pictures (out the train window on the Strasburg RR), so she'll be in the SI
: > this month even if I decide to sit it out. *:^|
: >
: > One negative I discovered this morning was that the Canon shop set my camera
: > back to factory settings. What saved me was that I had recorded all my
: > autofocus microadjustments in a spreadsheet and could reset them without
: > taking new test pictures. I recommend the practice. Too bad there's no way
: > (that I know of) to easily capture and restore the rest of the settings.
: >
: > Bob
:
: And people wonder why DSLR's are on the way out.

Why isn't that a non sequitur? Is there any reason to suppose that mirrorless
cameras won't require autofocus microadjustment? Or that dirt can't get into
the optics of an electronic viewfinder?

Is there anyone reading this who doubts that Nikon will sell a LARGE number of
D800's? Or that Canon is scrambling to catch up, even as we speak? With all
the times you've said it, I still don't know why you think DSLR's are on the
way out. I guess I agree that they'll lose most of their market share to
something else eventually, but not soon and not to their current competition.

Bob
 
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Bruce
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      04-22-2012
Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 14:59:51 -0700 (PDT), RichA <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>: And people wonder why DSLR's are on the way out.
>
>Why isn't that a non sequitur? Is there any reason to suppose that mirrorless
>cameras won't require autofocus microadjustment?



Yes, there is *every reason* to suppose that, Bob!

Mirrorless cameras use contrast detect AF which is performed on the
sensor, at the focal plane. Provided the camera is given time to
focus, there is no focusing error so no microadjustment is needed.

The weakness of the contrast detect AF system is that it isn't as good
at focus tracking as the phase detect AF systems used in all DSLRs
plus the Sony Alpha SLTs. The technology is getting better but the
best mirrorless AF systems still lag behind entry-level DSLRs at focus
tracking. But for static or near-static subjects, contrast detect AF
systems are now faster than phase detect AF systems as well as being
consistently accurate. The Olympus E-M5 is claimed to have the
world's fastest AF and all the most recent Olympus and Panasonic
bodies are almost as quick.

The Nikon 1 System goes a stage further with a dual AF system, both
contrast detect *and* phase detect AF. But both are built in to the
sensor, so there is no need for autofocus microadjustment.

It addresses the weaknesses of previous AF systems used in non-SLR
cameras and is a huge leap forward. Nikon holds a lot of patents
related to this hybrid system and is unlikely to allow other camera
manufacturers to use it for some time. But when it becomes widely
available, it will be a game changer.
 
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David Dyer-Bennet
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      04-23-2012
Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 14:59:51 -0700 (PDT), RichA <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> : On Apr 20, 6:19*pm, Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> : > I bought a new Canon 7D in late February (effectively giving up on the
> : > possibility of an affordable 5D3 a few days before my doubts were confirmed),
> : > and it arrived with a piece of visible black goop buried somewhere in the
> : > viewfinder. So I left it for a warranty repair at Canon's Jamesburg NJ shop on
> : > my way home from visiting my daughter in Philadelphia this week. I dropped it
> : > off just after noon on Tuesday, and it was sitting on my desk chair when I
> : > arrived at work at 7:45 Thursday morning. So if you thought that that level of
> : > service was gone with the wind, well ... maybe not. (Full disclosure: I'm a
> : > CPS Silver member, but extra fast service isn't an advertised benefit at that
> : > lowly level.)
> : >
> : > One of the things we did in Philadelphia (besides ogling Betsy and Shep's new
> : > house) was take a trip out to Amish country, because my 6-year-old grandson is
> : > a dedicated fan of the Pennsylvania Railroad Museum, Yes, that's "Amish", with
> : > an "A", as in this month's Shoot-In. However, my wife got by far the better
> : > pictures (out the train window on the Strasburg RR), so she'll be in the SI
> : > this month even if I decide to sit it out. *:^|
> : >
> : > One negative I discovered this morning was that the Canon shop set my camera
> : > back to factory settings. What saved me was that I had recorded all my
> : > autofocus microadjustments in a spreadsheet and could reset them without
> : > taking new test pictures. I recommend the practice. Too bad there's no way
> : > (that I know of) to easily capture and restore the rest of the settings.
> : >
> : > Bob
> :
> : And people wonder why DSLR's are on the way out.
>
> Why isn't that a non sequitur? Is there any reason to suppose that mirrorless
> cameras won't require autofocus microadjustment? Or that dirt can't get into
> the optics of an electronic viewfinder?


There's less indirection in the mirrorless focusing workflow, so it
ought to be more reliable. (Yes, that's a *theory*. As you know, in
theory, theory and practice are the same; in practrice, they differ.)

Any issues in the lens itself will still remain of course.

The electronic viewfinder can be more sealed, can't it? And at least
the LCD on the back is easier to clean.

> Is there anyone reading this who doubts that Nikon will sell a LARGE number of
> D800's? Or that Canon is scrambling to catch up, even as we speak? With all
> the times you've said it, I still don't know why you think DSLR's are on the
> way out. I guess I agree that they'll lose most of their market share to
> something else eventually, but not soon and not to their current competition.


Clearly the D800 is a huge achievement and looks to be a huge seller.
And yeah, I'm sure people at Canon are working overtime.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed); http://dd-b.net/
Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
 
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