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Hava java keyboard

 
 
skearney@accessbee.com
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      02-25-2005
When I was in boy scouts, as part of learning Morse code, I was told
that the inventor of the typewriter originally put the letter 'e' under
the left middle finger, just below its present position. The typist
was often too fast and the print bars would jam. I heard the same
story when I took a typing class. This led me to wonder if 't' might
have been moved from the home row for the same reason. 'E is dit and T
is dash, under middle and index the print bars would clash'.
If e and t on the home row made the human 'typewriter' too fast for the
machine, now that the machine can keep up, wouldn't it be a good idea
to put these letters back where they belong?
My letters over the years to various publications and keyboard
companies have often been answered with the observation that the Dvorak
keyboard, the gold standard, hasn't done very well in the market place
and that even small changes have big costs. Several days ago an
employee Segin suggested I try 'keytweek'. I hope that you will email,
or even publish, the following for anyone who might be interested.


The transposition of the letters dfjk with etni on a standard keyboard
increases the amount of text typed from the four keys under the middle
and index fingers by five times, from 7.5% to 37%. While not as
efficient as the Dvorak keyboard, it is much easier to learn. The
transposed keys remain under the same fingers and feel very natural.
The transposition can be thought out without benefit of a keyboard map.
For those who might worry that they will not be able to go back to
qwerty, the experience of many Dvorak users is that a typist can be
bikeyboardal. The letters etni are fairly easy to get used to but you
may find yourself trying to type dfjk from their old locations.

I have found a keyboard remapping program that is free, downloads
quickly and is very easy to use. I am typing this email on a keyboard
remapped to the 'etni' transposition layout. The program is called
'Keytweak 2.11' and can be googled up by that name. It is available
from several sites, includeing PC magazine and recommended by several
keyboard manufacturers, includeing TypeMatrix. The creator of the
program is Travis Krumsick.

1) After you have loaded the program hit start.
2) Click the keytweak icon and a graphic of a keyboard will appear.
3) Click the 'Full teach mode' at the bottom of the screen.
4) A box will appear. Click 'begin teach mode'.
5) Press the key you want to reassign, then the key you want it
reassigned to. In this case d and e.
6) Click 'remap key#1 to key#2'
7) The box will disappear and the scancodes of the keys will appear in
the 'pending changes' window at the bottom right.
Follow the same procedure (from 3) for the remaining seven remaps.
9) Click 'apply' and you will be asked if you want to turn off the
computer to apply the changes.
At the top there is also a clickable 'restore defaults' to give
you back your qwerty layout.
I was able to remap in under three minutes and restore qwerty in
thirty seconds, not includeing the restart.

If you would like to determine if etni on the home row is comfortable
for you, you might try typing the paragraph below in pretend mode.

Google is going to have a service that grants a location search option,
it gives unique results in the place where you are. Recently a company
began selling a wrist computer that uses the palm pilot operating
system and entry character set. It has real potential to receive
emails, cell phone text messages or the google service. Perhaps 'may I
have the time' will become 'may I have the time and weather'. This
will come out as shown below.

Googld ks gokjg fo havd a sdrvkcd fhaf grajfs a locafkoj sdarch opfkoj,
kf gkvds ujkqud rdsulfs kj fhd placd whdrd you ard. Rdcdjfly a compajy
bdgaj sdllkjg a wrksf compufdr fhaf usds fhd palm pklof opdrafkjg
sysfdm aje sfylus djfry characfdr sdf. Kf has rdal pofdjfkal fo
rdcdkvd dmakls, cdll phojd fdxf mdssagds or fhd googld sdrvkcd.
Perhaps 'may I havd fhd fkmd' wkll bdcomd 'may K havd fhd fkmd aje
wdafhdr'. Fhks wkll comd ouf as showj bdlow.

sfdphdj

 
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Richard
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      02-25-2005
On 24 Feb 2005 18:53:25 -0800 http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

> When I was in boy scouts, as part of learning Morse code, I was told
> that the inventor of the typewriter originally put the letter 'e' under
> the left middle finger, just below its present position. The typist
> was often too fast and the print bars would jam. I heard the same
> story when I took a typing class. This led me to wonder if 't' might
> have been moved from the home row for the same reason. 'E is dit and T
> is dash, under middle and index the print bars would clash'.
> If e and t on the home row made the human 'typewriter' too fast for the
> machine, now that the machine can keep up, wouldn't it be a good idea
> to put these letters back where they belong?
> My letters over the years to various publications and keyboard
> companies have often been answered with the observation that the Dvorak
> keyboard, the gold standard, hasn't done very well in the market place
> and that even small changes have big costs. Several days ago an
> employee Segin suggested I try 'keytweek'. I hope that you will email,
> or even publish, the following for anyone who might be interested.


Actually, there were several different styles of key layout for the
typewriter before the "qwerty" style was standardized.
While this is mainly due to the way in which the keys themselves struck the
paper, this method is now only used because it is so universal.

For today's modern community, the layout can be practically anything
desired.
My approach would be to have a simple 5x5 layout with the vowels in the
middle row. Similar to a touchtone keypad layout.
The rows above and below would be the more common letters first.
This would make the design easily adaptable to those who are not speed
typists, and may only have the use of one hand, or other disability.
As well as having a smaller footprint.



 
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skearney@accessbee.com
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-25-2005
The fitaly keyboard (named after the top row letters) is something like
your suggestion, the most common letters near the center. I don't want
to stray too far from the familiarity of qwerty. How fast do you think
you could adapt to your proposed layout?

 
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Randell D.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-25-2005
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

> When I was in boy scouts, as part of learning Morse code, I was told
> that the inventor of the typewriter originally put the letter 'e' under
> the left middle finger, just below its present position. The typist
> was often too fast and the print bars would jam. I heard the same
> story when I took a typing class. This led me to wonder if 't' might
> have been moved from the home row for the same reason. 'E is dit and T
> is dash, under middle and index the print bars would clash'.
> If e and t on the home row made the human 'typewriter' too fast for the
> machine, now that the machine can keep up, wouldn't it be a good idea
> to put these letters back where they belong?
> My letters over the years to various publications and keyboard
> companies have often been answered with the observation that the Dvorak
> keyboard, the gold standard, hasn't done very well in the market place
> and that even small changes have big costs. Several days ago an
> employee Segin suggested I try 'keytweek'. I hope that you will email,
> or even publish, the following for anyone who might be interested.
>
>
> The transposition of the letters dfjk with etni on a standard keyboard
> increases the amount of text typed from the four keys under the middle
> and index fingers by five times, from 7.5% to 37%. While not as
> efficient as the Dvorak keyboard, it is much easier to learn. The
> transposed keys remain under the same fingers and feel very natural.
> The transposition can be thought out without benefit of a keyboard map.
> For those who might worry that they will not be able to go back to
> qwerty, the experience of many Dvorak users is that a typist can be
> bikeyboardal. The letters etni are fairly easy to get used to but you
> may find yourself trying to type dfjk from their old locations.
>
> I have found a keyboard remapping program that is free, downloads
> quickly and is very easy to use. I am typing this email on a keyboard
> remapped to the 'etni' transposition layout. The program is called
> 'Keytweak 2.11' and can be googled up by that name. It is available
> from several sites, includeing PC magazine and recommended by several
> keyboard manufacturers, includeing TypeMatrix. The creator of the
> program is Travis Krumsick.
>
> 1) After you have loaded the program hit start.
> 2) Click the keytweak icon and a graphic of a keyboard will appear.
> 3) Click the 'Full teach mode' at the bottom of the screen.
> 4) A box will appear. Click 'begin teach mode'.
> 5) Press the key you want to reassign, then the key you want it
> reassigned to. In this case d and e.
> 6) Click 'remap key#1 to key#2'
> 7) The box will disappear and the scancodes of the keys will appear in
> the 'pending changes' window at the bottom right.
> Follow the same procedure (from 3) for the remaining seven remaps.
> 9) Click 'apply' and you will be asked if you want to turn off the
> computer to apply the changes.
> At the top there is also a clickable 'restore defaults' to give
> you back your qwerty layout.
> I was able to remap in under three minutes and restore qwerty in
> thirty seconds, not includeing the restart.
>
> If you would like to determine if etni on the home row is comfortable
> for you, you might try typing the paragraph below in pretend mode.
>
> Google is going to have a service that grants a location search option,
> it gives unique results in the place where you are. Recently a company
> began selling a wrist computer that uses the palm pilot operating
> system and entry character set. It has real potential to receive
> emails, cell phone text messages or the google service. Perhaps 'may I
> have the time' will become 'may I have the time and weather'. This
> will come out as shown below.
>
> Googld ks gokjg fo havd a sdrvkcd fhaf grajfs a locafkoj sdarch opfkoj,
> kf gkvds ujkqud rdsulfs kj fhd placd whdrd you ard. Rdcdjfly a compajy
> bdgaj sdllkjg a wrksf compufdr fhaf usds fhd palm pklof opdrafkjg
> sysfdm aje sfylus djfry characfdr sdf. Kf has rdal pofdjfkal fo
> rdcdkvd dmakls, cdll phojd fdxf mdssagds or fhd googld sdrvkcd.
> Perhaps 'may I havd fhd fkmd' wkll bdcomd 'may K havd fhd fkmd aje
> wdafhdr'. Fhks wkll comd ouf as showj bdlow.
>
> sfdphdj
>


What on earth has this sales pitch got to do with Javascript? Your
methods of selling are no different then viagra sellers, fake oil
merchants, and international lottery scams. Your intentions may well be
for the best, the product you're pushing might well work but your
subject is off-topic. Because of your post, I'll be sure to ignore your
product.
 
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skearney@accessbee.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-26-2005
Thank you for your guidance/criticism. I'm not selling any thing, I am
promoting a keyboard layout change, but you are right, my text and
technique reek of snake oil. I felt that since everyone who posts to a
newsgroup uses a keyboard, my post would be relavent everywhere.
Please don't condemn the simple idea of transposing dfjk with etni out
of hand because my writing is so tackey. Thanks atleast for using the
phrase 'might well work', it is my hope that that is what will come out
of this.

 
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Dr John Stockton
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-26-2005
JRS: In article <QiOTd.508776$6l.487035@pd7tw2no>, dated Fri, 25 Feb
2005 23:13:52, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Randell D. <reply.via.
(E-Mail Removed)> posted :

>Lines: 84


>(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>
>> When I was in boy scouts, as part of learning Morse code, I was told

>. ... ...


>What on earth has this sales pitch got to do with Javascript?
> ...


Nothing, which makes it rather silly of you to repeat it all. See FAQ.

--
John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 IE 4
<URL:http://www.jibbering.com/faq/> JL/RC: FAQ of news:comp.lang.javascript
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htm> jscr maths, dates, sources.
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> TP/BP/Delphi/jscr/&c, FAQ items, links.
 
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Evertjan.
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-26-2005
wrote on 26 feb 2005 in comp.lang.javascript:
> I felt that since everyone who posts to a
> newsgroup uses a keyboard, my post would be relavent everywhere.


The same goes for a toilet seat. Very relavent.

--
Evertjan.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)

 
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skearney@accessbee.com
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      02-26-2005
More specifically, everyone uses a toilet, and if I had found a way to
redece water usage that worked just as well and was free, I would have
probably made the same attempt to make it known.
In the ngs of which I am a semi regular poster, I have gotten mild
interest and a few questions. What I have discovered in the last two
days is that if I post to other ngs, it had better be relevant to the
specific subject area of the ng or it will either be ignored or provoke
genuine irritation...and no small measure of cutting wit.

 
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Evertjan.
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-26-2005
wrote on 26 feb 2005 in comp.lang.javascript:

> More specifically, everyone uses a toilet, and if I had found a way to
> redece water usage that worked just as well and was free, I would have
> probably made the same attempt to make it known.
> In the ngs of which I am a semi regular poster, I have gotten mild
> interest and a few questions. What I have discovered in the last two
> days is that if I post to other ngs, it had better be relevant to the
> specific subject area of the ng or it will either be ignored or provoke
> genuine irritation...and no small measure of cutting wit.


It is clear that you don't adhere to netiquette.

This is not email, but usenet, and postings should quote relevant part of
the text you are replying on.

Furthermore, what is the use of specific NGs, if the topics are not
constraint to relevancy?

--
Evertjan.
The Netherlands.
(Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)

 
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skearney@accessbee.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-26-2005

Evertjan. wrote:
> wrote on 26 feb 2005 in comp.lang.javascript:
>
> > More specifically, everyone uses a toilet, and if I had found a way

to
> > redece water usage that worked just as well and was free, I would

have
> > probably made the same attempt to make it known.
> > In the ngs of which I am a semi regular poster, I have gotten mild
> > interest and a few questions. What I have discovered in the last

two
> > days is that if I post to other ngs, it had better be relevant to

the
> > specific subject area of the ng or it will either be ignored or

provoke
> > genuine irritation...and no small measure of cutting wit.

>
> It is clear that you don't adhere to netiquette.


Why does Google make replying to specific text part of the options
and not standard, like it used to, are they trying to encourage bad
netiquette?
>
> This is not email, but usenet, and postings should quote relevant

part of
> the text you are replying on.
>
> Furthermore, what is the use of specific NGs, if the topics are not
> constraint to relevancy?
>

This comes under the heading of live and learn, fortunatly not the
more severe learn and live...if your lucky. Your point is well taken,
I have not posted to any new news groups since my tacky outburst.
While I don't know much about this ng, obviously, in other ngs an OT
post is often well recieved if it is by a respected member of the ng.
> --
> Evertjan.
> The Netherlands.
> (Replace all crosses with dots in my emailaddress)


With greatest respect,
Stephen

 
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