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BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX

 
 
John Bokma
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      12-25-2006
Ric <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> I do lots of perl programming and I have done lots of writing in C/C++
> and C#, buts that's the silliest argument I've heard so far.


Clueless. Technically it's possible to run (a subset of) Perl on .NET.

--
John Experienced Perl programmer: http://castleamber.com/

Perl help, tutorials, and examples: http://johnbokma.com/perl/
 
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John W. Kennedy
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      12-25-2006
Puckdropper wrote:
> Mark Clements <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:458e7852
> $0$27366$(E-Mail Removed):
>
>
>> People still measure application size in terms of lines of code?
>>
>> Mark

>
> Sure, what other metric is common to programs that's easily measured?
>
> It's bad, but it's the best they've got. I had probably 1000 LOC in a
> recent class project and probably wrote only 100 myself. Everything else
> was done by a GUI builder or by the UML tool I used. (It was Java, not
> Perl, but I constantly wished it was Perl. Does that count as on topic
> here? )


I seem to recall that, back in the 60s or 70s, someone did a study and
discovered that LOCs actually was a pretty decent metric, even
cross-language. From one language to another, one LOC seemed to take up
about the same average amount of planning, debugging, etc.

--
John W. Kennedy
"The blind rulers of Logres
Nourished the land on a fallacy of rational virtue."
-- Charles Williams. "Taliessin through Logres: Prelude"
 
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Tad McClellan
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      12-25-2006
Michele Dondi <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Sat, 23 Dec 2006 19:34:10 -0600, Tad McClellan
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>> Subject: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX

> [snip]
>>Any of the tutorials mentioned in the Perl FAQ.
>>
>> perldoc -q book

>
> Also, today I went around by my town and I also enterd the bookstore
> which probably has the biggest CS section here. I gave a quick look at
> the Perl books, and I noticed a "Minimal Perl" one which should be
> aimed precisely at UNIX/Linux sysadmins. I can't comment on the book
> proper, but the latter has a foreword by ("that") Conway, and I don't
> believe in the principle of authority in general, but a priori that's
> a sort of guarantee...



Tim Maher is the Real Deal, so I expect that his is a fine book too,
though I have not read it.


--
Tad McClellan SGML consulting
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) Perl programming
Fort Worth, Texas
 
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Ted Zlatanov
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      12-27-2006
On 24 Dec 2006, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:

> Mark Clements <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:458e7852
> $0$27366$(E-Mail Removed):
>
>
>> People still measure application size in terms of lines of code?

>
> Sure, what other metric is common to programs that's easily
> measured?


Function points, man-hours and money spent, number of curse words in
the comments, weight of documentation...

> It's bad, but it's the best they've got. I had probably 1000 LOC in a
> recent class project and probably wrote only 100 myself. Everything else
> was done by a GUI builder or by the UML tool I used. (It was Java, not
> Perl, but I constantly wished it was Perl. Does that count as on topic
> here? )


Note that such automatically generated code will still have to exist
within your application, and some day it will throw a mysterious
error you'll have to debug. So it's definitely a part of your LOC
count.

Ted
 
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Ted Zlatanov
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      12-27-2006
On 24 Dec 2006, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:

> I seem to recall that, back in the 60s or 70s, someone did a study and
> discovered that LOCs actually was a pretty decent metric, even
> cross-language. From one language to another, one LOC seemed to take
> up about the same average amount of planning, debugging, etc.


Scripting languages like Perl, Python, etc. definitely break this
rule. I'd say the ratio is 5-20 LOC in C to 1 LOC in Perl, depending
on the skill of the programmer and the actual application.

The "lines of comments" count, however, is about 3 to 1 for proper
documentation IMO.

Ted
 
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