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Chrome for Android does not support JAVA

 
 
Arne Vajhøj
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      04-02-2012
On 4/1/2012 4:50 PM, Thufir wrote:
> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 13:39:43 -0500, Nasser M. Abbasi wrote:
>> People now think HTML5/Javascript is the next big thing, where everyone
>> will write their wonderful advanced 20 million lines applications in
>> HTML5 and Javascript.

>
> You're assuming everyone has stable, non-infected pc's. The whole point
> of the cloud, insofar as I can tell, to avoid annoying support calls
> which end in either "reboot" or "re-install".


That is not a common reason given.

> The beauty of AJAX, etc, is in terms of support. It's a complex way of
> getting away from Windows, to which people will go to extraordinary
> lengths.


Windows has not really lost significant market market share.

And given that it with Windows 8 planned to be releases
in October will be possible to write Windows desktop apps
in HTML5/CSS/JS, then that combo is fine for Windows.

Arne

 
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Arne Vajhj
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      04-02-2012
On 4/1/2012 2:39 PM, Nasser M. Abbasi wrote:
> On 2/15/2012 6:50 AM, Richard Maher wrote:
>> Is anyone else gutted that the Chrome browser on Android will not support
>> JAVA, Flash or any other pluggin?
>>
>> I thought Google and Android were big on JAVA?

>
> I am starting to think that this whole idea of 'running applications
> in the cloud' will never work as well as running an application
> on the desktop.


It is 10+ years since many apps moved to web apps.

And whether the web app is hosted in house or in the cloud
does not have functional impact.

So it will work for many apps.

But there are probably also some apps that it will not work for.

> If I see the same thing with a choice of an applet or a jar file
> that I can download first and run on the PC, I now go for the jar
> file choice.
>
> The speed of the internet these days makes downloading things
> not an issue any more.
>
> People now think HTML5/Javascript is the next big thing, where
> everyone will write their wonderful advanced 20 million lines
> applications in HTML5 and Javascript.
>
> May be for simple games and basic app this will work, but
> for advanced applications where good and robust performance
> is important, running things directly on the desktop/computer
> will always be better than running things inside yet another
> software application like the browser.


HTML5/CSS/JS will still be mostly presentation layer.

For that purpose performance will be good enough for many
apps.

Arne

 
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Arved Sandstrom
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      04-02-2012
On 12-04-01 09:16 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
> On 4/1/2012 4:50 PM, Thufir wrote:
>> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 13:39:43 -0500, Nasser M. Abbasi wrote:
>>> People now think HTML5/Javascript is the next big thing, where everyone
>>> will write their wonderful advanced 20 million lines applications in
>>> HTML5 and Javascript.

>>
>> You're assuming everyone has stable, non-infected pc's. The whole point
>> of the cloud, insofar as I can tell, to avoid annoying support calls
>> which end in either "reboot" or "re-install".

>
> That is not a common reason given.


Not having to worry about the infrastructure is in fact one of the most
common reasons for going to the cloud. If you look at IaaS, PaaS, SaaS
(or any others of the derivative ?aaS's) all of them relieve you of some
degree of worry about (read "support for") some aspect of IT.

[ SNIP ]

AHS
--
A fly was very close to being called a "land," cause that's what they do
half the time.
-- Mitch Hedberg
 
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Thufir
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      04-02-2012
On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 21:40:10 -0300, Arved Sandstrom wrote:

>>> You're assuming everyone has stable, non-infected pc's. The whole
>>> point of the cloud, insofar as I can tell, to avoid annoying support
>>> calls which end in either "reboot" or "re-install".

>>
>> That is not a common reason given.

>
> Not having to worry about the infrastructure is in fact one of the most
> common reasons for going to the cloud. If you look at IaaS, PaaS, SaaS
> (or any others of the derivative ?aaS's) all of them relieve you of some
> degree of worry about (read "support for") some aspect of IT.



Exactly. That Windows is prevalent is undoubtedly an indirect reason for
all this cloud stuff -- it expressly avoids dealing with Windows
directly. Instead you deal with the browser. Which, of course, is where
ActiveX extensions come in...

If everyone was on an iMac or something reliable and secure, then desktop
apps would rule, is my point. Or, to turn that question around: *why*
medium sized businesses like their stuff in the cloud? Only because it
eliminates the local pc as a problem, I say.
 
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Arne Vajhøj
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      04-02-2012
On 4/1/2012 8:40 PM, Arved Sandstrom wrote:
> On 12-04-01 09:16 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
>> On 4/1/2012 4:50 PM, Thufir wrote:
>>> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 13:39:43 -0500, Nasser M. Abbasi wrote:
>>>> People now think HTML5/Javascript is the next big thing, where everyone
>>>> will write their wonderful advanced 20 million lines applications in
>>>> HTML5 and Javascript.
>>>
>>> You're assuming everyone has stable, non-infected pc's. The whole point
>>> of the cloud, insofar as I can tell, to avoid annoying support calls
>>> which end in either "reboot" or "re-install".

>>
>> That is not a common reason given.

>
> Not having to worry about the infrastructure is in fact one of the most
> common reasons for going to the cloud. If you look at IaaS, PaaS, SaaS
> (or any others of the derivative ?aaS's) all of them relieve you of some
> degree of worry about (read "support for") some aspect of IT.


Not worrying about infrastructure is indeed a common
reason.

But I have never heard about not having to reboot or
reinstall client side Windows as a common reason.

Arne

 
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Roedy Green
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      04-02-2012
On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 13:39:43 -0500, "Nasser M. Abbasi" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

>I am starting to think that this whole idea of 'running applications
>in the cloud' will never work as well as running an application
>on the desktop.


Google is pulling the same stunt that Microsoft did long ago. They are
creating a variant jar file for to run Java apps on their platform.
They don't want apps developed for Android universally available.

They have more excuse than MS did. You can't very will implement
Swing on a cell-phone, at least not this week.


--
Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
http://mindprod.com
When you were a child, if you did your own experiment
to see if it was better to put to cocoa into your cup first
or the hot milk first, then you likely have the programmer gene..
 
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Silvio Bierman
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      04-02-2012
On 04/02/2012 04:00 AM, Thufir wrote:
> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 21:40:10 -0300, Arved Sandstrom wrote:
>
>>>> You're assuming everyone has stable, non-infected pc's. The whole
>>>> point of the cloud, insofar as I can tell, to avoid annoying support
>>>> calls which end in either "reboot" or "re-install".
>>>
>>> That is not a common reason given.

>>
>> Not having to worry about the infrastructure is in fact one of the most
>> common reasons for going to the cloud. If you look at IaaS, PaaS, SaaS
>> (or any others of the derivative ?aaS's) all of them relieve you of some
>> degree of worry about (read "support for") some aspect of IT.

>
>
> Exactly. That Windows is prevalent is undoubtedly an indirect reason for
> all this cloud stuff -- it expressly avoids dealing with Windows
> directly. Instead you deal with the browser. Which, of course, is where
> ActiveX extensions come in...
>
> If everyone was on an iMac or something reliable and secure, then desktop
> apps would rule, is my point. Or, to turn that question around: *why*
> medium sized businesses like their stuff in the cloud? Only because it
> eliminates the local pc as a problem, I say.


First of all iMac and Linux (which I use) desktops are hardly more
secure than a Windows desktop. That is all in the numbers. The more
users the more security mishaps, largely because such a user base is
attractive to hackers. The fact that the average non-Windows users are
more techy than their counterparts and are therefore more security aware
further amplifies this.

The Cloud has little or nothing to do with that. It may even introduce
more security hazards than it circumvents.

The Cloud is mostly about having the same functionality AND data on all
devices you may use. The desktop at work, the old PC at home, your
phone, the shiny new tablet you bought your wife, your friends high end
TV you can now use to show him something you did at work, the PC in the
Internet cafe during your vacation, etc. etc.

The Cload makes verything be about your data and what you do with it
instead of the devices (and to a large extent the applications) you
happen to use at any moment in time.
 
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Arved Sandstrom
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      04-02-2012
On 12-04-01 11:19 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
> On 4/1/2012 8:40 PM, Arved Sandstrom wrote:
>> On 12-04-01 09:16 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
>>> On 4/1/2012 4:50 PM, Thufir wrote:
>>>> On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 13:39:43 -0500, Nasser M. Abbasi wrote:
>>>>> People now think HTML5/Javascript is the next big thing, where
>>>>> everyone
>>>>> will write their wonderful advanced 20 million lines applications in
>>>>> HTML5 and Javascript.
>>>>
>>>> You're assuming everyone has stable, non-infected pc's. The whole
>>>> point
>>>> of the cloud, insofar as I can tell, to avoid annoying support calls
>>>> which end in either "reboot" or "re-install".
>>>
>>> That is not a common reason given.

>>
>> Not having to worry about the infrastructure is in fact one of the most
>> common reasons for going to the cloud. If you look at IaaS, PaaS, SaaS
>> (or any others of the derivative ?aaS's) all of them relieve you of some
>> degree of worry about (read "support for") some aspect of IT.

>
> Not worrying about infrastructure is indeed a common
> reason.
>
> But I have never heard about not having to reboot or
> reinstall client side Windows as a common reason.
>
> Arne
>

I didn't have it narrowed down to "client side", Arne. If it is narrowed
down to that then I don't know if we're talking about a common reason or
just a reason. It's certainly not an insignificant reason: it's a short
step from desktop virtualization inside your own organization to the
Desktop-as-a-Service variant of SaaS. If that isn't a common reason now
for "cloud" it surely will be soon.

AHS
--
A fly was very close to being called a "land," cause that's what they do
half the time.
-- Mitch Hedberg
 
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Richard Maher
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      04-02-2012

"Arne Vajhj" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:4f78f0bc$0$295$(E-Mail Removed)...
> On 4/1/2012 2:39 PM, Nasser M. Abbasi wrote:
> HTML5/CSS/JS will still be mostly presentation layer.
>
> For that purpose performance will be good enough for many
> apps.


For others the ability to share global memory in the form of Applet static
variables across multiple tabs in a browser instance can be considered the
Mutt's nuts! Multiplexing and multi-threading all tab/server communication
over a single high-performance and secure binary TCP/IP Socket is also rich
functionality-viagra for those who know how to take advantage of a
persistent, full-duplex, network connection.

But everyone is obviously free to continue to throw happiness away with both
hands.

>
> Arne
>


Cheers Richard Maher


 
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Thufir
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      04-02-2012
On Mon, 02 Apr 2012 20:25:46 +0800, Richard Maher wrote:


> For others the ability to share global memory in the form of Applet
> static variables across multiple tabs in a browser instance can be
> considered the Mutt's nuts! Multiplexing and multi-threading all
> tab/server communication over a single high-performance and secure
> binary TCP/IP Socket is also rich functionality-viagra for those who
> know how to take advantage of a persistent, full-duplex, network
> connection.



Can you expand on that a bit with a use case? By tab/server you mean
client server?

The user has n tabs open on the browser to the same web app?


-Thufir
 
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