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2011: Which Ruby books have you read? And which would you recommend?

 
 
Nick Klauer
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      03-15-2011
[Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

I'm currently on chapter 5 of that book. So far I really like it.

I recently read Using JRuby, but that's only interesting if you're
interested in blending Java and Ruby. It's still a great, book, though.


On Mon, Mar 14, 2011 at 18:41, Aston J. <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Finished Eloquent Ruby the other day - another great book from Russ
> Olsen, well worth a read!
>
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>
>


 
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7stud --
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      03-16-2011
1)For Beginners:

a)The Pickaxe (i.e. Programming Ruby by Dave Thomas, et al, the latest
edition). You need the docs in the back of the book for a reference--I
think this book is required for that reason alone.

b)Beginning Ruby: From Novice to Professional(latest edition) -- a good,
basic book with some nice, lengthier examples and a good section on ruby
and the web(which is really the defacto docs on the subject, as far as I
can tell).


2)Intermediate:

a) The Well Grounded Rubyist (by David Black who also posts great advice
here). I thought it was a very good book, and I need to reread it.

b) MetaProgramming Ruby -- pretty easy to understand, so don't let the
word 'metaprogramming' throw you off. The setting is your new ruby
programming job at a company where you and your co-worker Bill rewrite
legacy code. Bill stops and gives you a complete tutorial about the
tricks he plans to employ to rewrite portions of the code. Then Bill
presents examples of the same tricks employed in various ruby libraries.
I thought the back and forth dialogue between Bill and the newbie(you)
was amusing.

The word "metaprogramming" as used here really means "dynamic"
programming, which I would define as programming in situations when you
have a variable name, method name, or class name as a string and you
want to do something to the actual variable, method, or class. The book
contains a good explanation of the class structure in ruby, and how to
keep track of what 'self' refers to.


3) Advanced:

a) Design Patterns in Ruby -- I've only read the beginning of this book,
and I really liked it. I have a design patterns book for Java, and
though patterns were originally developed for statically typed languages
like Java, the patterns are so complex that they are hard to understand.
And the complexity has largely to do with creating classes or interfaces
that allow you to produce a certain type.

One of the easier patterns, the Decorator pattern, can easily be
comprehended in a dynamically typed language like python and ruby--when
you eliminate all the type-ing.

I plan on buying this book next, and I look forward to finally
understanding some of the GOF patterns with out all the type complexity
mucking things up.

--
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.

 
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Josh Cheek
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      03-16-2011
[Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

On Tue, Mar 15, 2011 at 9:46 PM, 7stud -- <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> The word "metaprogramming" as used here really means "dynamic"
> programming, which I would define as programming in situations when you
> have a variable name, method name, or class name as a string and you
> want to do something to the actual variable, method, or class. The book
> contains a good explanation of the class structure in ruby, and how to
> keep track of what 'self' refers to.
>
>

"Dynamic programming" is already defined, though, it's an approach to
writing algorithms. I think it's not a very fitting name for that, and think
your definition is hinting at a much more useful concept, but nonetheless it
is claimed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_programming

 
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Justin Collins
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      03-16-2011
On 03/15/2011 09:01 PM, Josh Cheek wrote:
> On Tue, Mar 15, 2011 at 9:46 PM, 7stud --<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>> The word "metaprogramming" as used here really means "dynamic"
>> programming, which I would define as programming in situations when you
>> have a variable name, method name, or class name as a string and you
>> want to do something to the actual variable, method, or class. The book
>> contains a good explanation of the class structure in ruby, and how to
>> keep track of what 'self' refers to.
>>
>>
>>

> "Dynamic programming" is already defined, though, it's an approach to
> writing algorithms. I think it's not a very fitting name for that, and think
> your definition is hinting at a much more useful concept, but nonetheless it
> is claimed.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_programming
>


It is a pretty unfortunate name with an odd story behind it:
http://www.eng.tau.ac.il/~ami/cd/or5...50-01-0048.pdf
<http://www.eng.tau.ac.il/%7Eami/cd/or50/1526-5463-2002-50-01-0048.pdf>

-Justin

 
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