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2011: Which Ruby books have you read? And which would you recommend?

 
 
Aston J.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-31-2011
I know there are a lot of threads about books, but some of them are as
old as 2006 - and I think it would be nice to get a more up to date list
of hot Ruby books, especially for anyone interested in learning the
latest version of Ruby, 1.9 (it's still ok to recommend older books if
you feel they are still relevant).

I for one will be very eager to see which of the books you have read you
have 'fallen in love with' - they're the ones I will most likely get
first

Thanks in advance.

****************************************
Which Ruby books have you read?
And which of those would you recommend?
*******************************************

--
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.

 
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Aston J.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-31-2011
I haven't read many myself yet, but I have read The Well Grounded
Rubyist. It's an utterly superb book. The author is a real-life
teacher and it really shows. He goes to great lengths to help make sure
the
book is as easily to digest as possible. Very VERY highly recommended,
especially for those of us new to Ruby (or coming to Ruby from Rails).

I started to read the Pickaxe book (Programming Ruby 1.9) but I didn't
really get into it, then Ryan Bigg recommended the Well Grounded Rubyist
and I was engrossed in that (I read it cover to cover!). I have
restarted the Pickaxe book, though will be keeping an eye on this thread
- any books that are very highly recommended might push in to my reading
list before it!

I also started Metaprogramming Ruby (after reading The Well Grounded
Rubyist), got 30% through it then couldn't do the quizz without cheating
- so think it's too much of a jump for me. Hence going back to more
basics-covering texts like the Pickaxe book.

I'll add more posts to this thread as and when I read more - you can't
edit posts here, so please look out for further thoughts about the books
I've mentioned above for an more up-to-date viewpoint.

--
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.

 
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Charles Oliver Nutter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-31-2011
On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 12:18 PM, Aston J. <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I know there are a lot of threads about books, but some of them are as
> old as 2006 - and I think it would be nice to get a more up to date list
> of hot Ruby books, especially for anyone interested in learning the
> latest version of Ruby, 1.9 (it's still ok to recommend older books if
> you feel they are still relevant).


I'd recommend "Using JRuby" from PragProg, which just recently went to press

- Charlie

 
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Anurag Priyam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-31-2011
> I know there are a lot of threads about books, but some of them are as
> old as 2006 - and I think it would be nice to get a more up to date list
> of hot Ruby books, especially for anyone interested in learning the
> latest version of Ruby, 1.9 (it's still ok to recommend older books if
> you feel they are still relevant).


Makes sense .

> I for one will be very eager to see which of the books you have read you
> have 'fallen in love with' - they're the ones I will most likely get
> first


I have read, and absolutely love "The Ruby Programming Language" by
Flannagan and Matz, and "Ruby Best Practices" by Gregory Brown. While
the former serves as a fantastic reference, the later deals with Ruby
programming practices in real projects and picking up a lot or Ruby
idioms.

Another interesting book that I had a chance to lay my hands on was
"Practical Ruby Projects" by Topher Cyll. I found it more fun than
practical; even the author sub-titles it "ideas for the eclectic
programmer". It deals with things like: generating SVG animations,
implementing Lisp in Ruby (loved this chapter), creating music with
MIDI, Mac OS X GUI, Genetic Algorithms. Would suggest reading it in
leisure time, or at an intermediate level.

Hal Fulton's "The Ruby Way" is another book that I have read. It was
the first Ruby book that I bought as The Pickaxe was way expensive in
India back then. I was able to learn a good deal from it as a
beginner. I would not recommend it though (not even to a beginner) as
you can learn the same thing (without paying for the book) from the
Ruby documentation, or Google. For the same reasons, I think it has
lost much of its significance now.

I have done some light reading on "Enterprise Integration with Ruby",
and "Practical Ruby for System Administration". They contain some
decent examples, but have a very beginner-ish and closed feeling to
it. I don't think that they don't teach you anything concrete, rather
gives you the answer to some closed form problems that you could have
come up with (think, google, think, implement) with any way.

Some books that have got good reviews, and I am looking forward to
read (waiting for cheaper Indian reprint to come out ) are "Design
Patterns in Ruby", and "Refactoring - Ruby Edition". I think these
books are relevant as they teach you something concrete - patterns,
styles, and practices that you can apply, and reapply to different
problems later. Would refrain from commenting more as I have not
actually read them.

tl;dr - Learn Ruby by reading "The Ruby Programming Language" while
get better at it by writing, and reading a lot of code (FOSS, fun
projects, rewriting class room assignments in Ruby). And yeah, "Ruby
Best Practices is excellent, and free (I love advertising it ).

--
Anurag Priyam
http://about.me/yeban/

 
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serialhex
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-01-2011
[Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

+1 http://rubybestpractices.com/ i'm really enjoying reading this book, the
pdf is a permanent tab in chrome for me. I'm learning a lot from this book!

i have both the 2nd & 3rd editions of the pickaxe (rb 1.8 & 1.9 resp.
technically i also have access to the first - online for free) i love it
for the reference. i cant seem to get over needing a *physical* book to
turn pages on. and the fact that i can browse the std lib just by flipping
pages. linkage: http://pragprog.com/titles/ruby3/programming-ruby-1-9

<http://pragprog.com/titles/ruby3/programming-ruby-1-9>i rather like the
ruby cookbook by o'reilly http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596523695. it's
helped me learn a number of things that some people just *assume* you know.
though i'm sure one can learn alot thats in this book by googling or
looking up source, having this much info at your fingertips is worth the $50
IMO. unfortunately it dosnt cover ruby 1.9 & if your an experienced
developer it probably wont be much help, but for someone just starting i do
recommend it.

recently i found a book called clever algorithms
http://www.cleveralgorithms.com/ and while it's more aimed toward people
dealing with optimization problems & A.I. all of the example code is written
in ruby (not in a very ruby-ish way, but it's minimalist implementations of
the algorithms). this book isn't necessarily for everybody, but for those
interested in A.I. & such it's really cool. AND it's free (print version
~$20). (this especially rocks cause i found it on my B-day - which was
saturday, and A.I. is my main field of interest, so a ruby book dealing with
A.I. thats free on my B-day... who could pass that up??)

lastly, the book that **REALLY** got me interested in ruby is why's
(poignant) guide to ruby ( http://mislav.uniqpath.com/poignant-guide/ is the
first archive i found, they're all over) and really helped me learn ruby
when i was first starting out. i highly recommend it to anybody who hasn't
read it just because it's a very interesting artistic work (if nothing else)
and an interesting way to learn a programming language. i'd really like
more intro-to-this-language books like this.

that's really it for me. next?

hex



On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 6:46 PM, James Nathan <(E-Mail Removed)>wrote:

> I have Beginning Ruby and Beginning Rails. but no training as a programmers
> the real world do not want to help us with the questions about Ruby
> James
>
> --- On Mon, 1/31/11, Anurag Priyam <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> From: Anurag Priyam <(E-Mail Removed)>
> Subject: Re: 2011: Which Ruby books have you read? And which would you
> recommend?
> To: "ruby-talk ML" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> Date: Monday, January 31, 2011, 1:24 PM
>
> > I know there are a lot of threads about books, but some of them are as
> > old as 2006 - and I think it would be nice to get a more up to date list
> > of hot Ruby books, especially for anyone interested in learning the
> > latest version of Ruby, 1.9 (it's still ok to recommend older books if
> > you feel they are still relevant).

>
> Makes sense .
>
> > I for one will be very eager to see which of the books you have read you
> > have 'fallen in love with' - they're the ones I will most likely get
> > first

>
> I have read, and absolutely love "The Ruby Programming Language" by
> Flannagan and Matz, and "Ruby Best Practices" by Gregory Brown. While
> the former serves as a fantastic reference, the later deals with Ruby
> programming practices in real projects and picking up a lot or Ruby
> idioms.
>
> Another interesting book that I had a chance to lay my hands on was
> "Practical Ruby Projects" by Topher Cyll. I found it more fun than
> practical; even the author sub-titles it "ideas for the eclectic
> programmer". It deals with things like: generating SVG animations,
> implementing Lisp in Ruby (loved this chapter), creating music with
> MIDI, Mac OS X GUI, Genetic Algorithms. Would suggest reading it in
> leisure time, or at an intermediate level.
>
> Hal Fulton's "The Ruby Way" is another book that I have read. It was
> the first Ruby book that I bought as The Pickaxe was way expensive in
> India back then. I was able to learn a good deal from it as a
> beginner. I would not recommend it though (not even to a beginner) as
> you can learn the same thing (without paying for the book) from the
> Ruby documentation, or Google. For the same reasons, I think it has
> lost much of its significance now.
>
> I have done some light reading on "Enterprise Integration with Ruby",
> and "Practical Ruby for System Administration". They contain some
> decent examples, but have a very beginner-ish and closed feeling to
> it. I don't think that they don't teach you anything concrete, rather
> gives you the answer to some closed form problems that you could have
> come up with (think, google, think, implement) with any way.
>
> Some books that have got good reviews, and I am looking forward to
> read (waiting for cheaper Indian reprint to come out ) are "Design
> Patterns in Ruby", and "Refactoring - Ruby Edition". I think these
> books are relevant as they teach you something concrete - patterns,
> styles, and practices that you can apply, and reapply to different
> problems later. Would refrain from commenting more as I have not
> actually read them.
>
> tl;dr - Learn Ruby by reading "The Ruby Programming Language" while
> get better at it by writing, and reading a lot of code (FOSS, fun
> projects, rewriting class room assignments in Ruby). And yeah, "Ruby
> Best Practices is excellent, and free (I love advertising it ).
>
> --
> Anurag Priyam
> http://about.me/yeban/
>
>
>
>
>
>


 
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Fabio Cevasco
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-01-2011
I read and reviewed many Addison-Wesley books on Ruby lately, and my
favorites are:
-- Refactoring, Ruby Edition --
http://www.informit.com/store/produc...n=3D0321603508
-- Design Patterns in Ruby --
http://www.informit.com/store/produc...n=3D0321490452

They do not provide a lot of reference materials like The Pickaxe or The
Ruby Way, but they will teach you how to code in Ruby properly.

Concerning free (and recent) books, check out:
-- The Little Book of Ruby --
http://www.sapphiresteel.com/The-Little-Book-Of-Ruby
-- The Book of Ruby --
http://www.sapphiresteel.com/Blog/Th...-free-in-depth

*Fabio Cevasco*
**=C2=BB email: http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
<(E-Mail Removed)>=C2=BB web site: www.H3RALD.com <http://www.h3rald.com>



On Tue, Feb 1, 2011 at 1:26 AM, serialhex <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> +1 http://rubybestpractices.com/ i'm really enjoying reading this book,
> the
> pdf is a permanent tab in chrome for me. I'm learning a lot from this
> book!
>
> i have both the 2nd & 3rd editions of the pickaxe (rb 1.8 & 1.9 resp.
> technically i also have access to the first - online for free) i love i=

t
> for the reference. i cant seem to get over needing a *physical* book to
> turn pages on. and the fact that i can browse the std lib just by flippi=

ng
> pages. linkage: http://pragprog.com/titles/ruby3/programming-ruby-1-9
>
> <http://pragprog.com/titles/ruby3/programming-ruby-1-9>i rather like the
> ruby cookbook by o'reilly http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596523695. it's
> helped me learn a number of things that some people just *assume* you kno=

w.
> though i'm sure one can learn alot thats in this book by googling or
> looking up source, having this much info at your fingertips is worth the
> $50
> IMO. unfortunately it dosnt cover ruby 1.9 & if your an experienced
> developer it probably wont be much help, but for someone just starting i =

do
> recommend it.
>
> recently i found a book called clever algorithms
> http://www.cleveralgorithms.com/ and while it's more aimed toward people
> dealing with optimization problems & A.I. all of the example code is
> written
> in ruby (not in a very ruby-ish way, but it's minimalist implementations =

of
> the algorithms). this book isn't necessarily for everybody, but for thos=

e
> interested in A.I. & such it's really cool. AND it's free (print version
> ~$20). (this especially rocks cause i found it on my B-day - which was
> saturday, and A.I. is my main field of interest, so a ruby book dealing
> with
> A.I. thats free on my B-day... who could pass that up??)
>
> lastly, the book that **REALLY** got me interested in ruby is why's
> (poignant) guide to ruby ( http://mislav.uniqpath.com/poignant-guide/ is
> the
> first archive i found, they're all over) and really helped me learn ruby
> when i was first starting out. i highly recommend it to anybody who hasn=

't
> read it just because it's a very interesting artistic work (if nothing
> else)
> and an interesting way to learn a programming language. i'd really like
> more intro-to-this-language books like this.
>
> that's really it for me. next?
>
> hex
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 6:46 PM, James Nathan <(E-Mail Removed)
> >wrote:

>
> > I have Beginning Ruby and Beginning Rails. but no training as a

> programmers
> > the real world do not want to help us with the questions about Ruby
> > James
> >
> > --- On Mon, 1/31/11, Anurag Priyam <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >
> > From: Anurag Priyam <(E-Mail Removed)>
> > Subject: Re: 2011: Which Ruby books have you read? And which would you
> > recommend?
> > To: "ruby-talk ML" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> > Date: Monday, January 31, 2011, 1:24 PM
> >
> > > I know there are a lot of threads about books, but some of them are a=

s
> > > old as 2006 - and I think it would be nice to get a more up to date

> list
> > > of hot Ruby books, especially for anyone interested in learning the
> > > latest version of Ruby, 1.9 (it's still ok to recommend older books i=

f
> > > you feel they are still relevant).

> >
> > Makes sense .
> >
> > > I for one will be very eager to see which of the books you have read

> you
> > > have 'fallen in love with' - they're the ones I will most likely get
> > > first

> >
> > I have read, and absolutely love "The Ruby Programming Language" by
> > Flannagan and Matz, and "Ruby Best Practices" by Gregory Brown. While
> > the former serves as a fantastic reference, the later deals with Ruby
> > programming practices in real projects and picking up a lot or Ruby
> > idioms.
> >
> > Another interesting book that I had a chance to lay my hands on was
> > "Practical Ruby Projects" by Topher Cyll. I found it more fun than
> > practical; even the author sub-titles it "ideas for the eclectic
> > programmer". It deals with things like: generating SVG animations,
> > implementing Lisp in Ruby (loved this chapter), creating music with
> > MIDI, Mac OS X GUI, Genetic Algorithms. Would suggest reading it in
> > leisure time, or at an intermediate level.
> >
> > Hal Fulton's "The Ruby Way" is another book that I have read. It was
> > the first Ruby book that I bought as The Pickaxe was way expensive in
> > India back then. I was able to learn a good deal from it as a
> > beginner. I would not recommend it though (not even to a beginner) as
> > you can learn the same thing (without paying for the book) from the
> > Ruby documentation, or Google. For the same reasons, I think it has
> > lost much of its significance now.
> >
> > I have done some light reading on "Enterprise Integration with Ruby",
> > and "Practical Ruby for System Administration". They contain some
> > decent examples, but have a very beginner-ish and closed feeling to
> > it. I don't think that they don't teach you anything concrete, rather
> > gives you the answer to some closed form problems that you could have
> > come up with (think, google, think, implement) with any way.
> >
> > Some books that have got good reviews, and I am looking forward to
> > read (waiting for cheaper Indian reprint to come out ) are "Design
> > Patterns in Ruby", and "Refactoring - Ruby Edition". I think these
> > books are relevant as they teach you something concrete - patterns,
> > styles, and practices that you can apply, and reapply to different
> > problems later. Would refrain from commenting more as I have not
> > actually read them.
> >
> > tl;dr - Learn Ruby by reading "The Ruby Programming Language" while
> > get better at it by writing, and reading a lot of code (FOSS, fun
> > projects, rewriting class room assignments in Ruby). And yeah, "Ruby
> > Best Practices is excellent, and free (I love advertising it ).
> >
> > --
> > Anurag Priyam
> > http://about.me/yeban/
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >

>


 
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flebber
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-01-2011
On Feb 1, 7:13*pm, Fabio Cevasco <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I read and reviewed many Addison-Wesley books on Ruby lately, and my
> favorites are:
> -- Refactoring, Ruby Edition --http://www.informit.com/store/product.aspx?isbn=0321603508
> -- Design Patterns in Ruby --http://www.informit.com/store/product.aspx?isbn=0321490452
>
> They do not provide a lot of reference materials like The Pickaxe or The
> Ruby Way, but they will teach you how to code in Ruby properly.
>
> Concerning free (and recent) books, check out:
> -- The Little Book of Ruby --http://www.sapphiresteel.com/The-Little-Book-Of-Ruby
> -- The Book of Ruby --http://www.sapphiresteel.com/Blog/The-Book-Of-Ruby-free-in-depth
>
> *Fabio Cevasco*
> ** email: (E-Mail Removed)
> *<(E-Mail Removed)> web site:www.H3RALD.com<http://www.h3rald.com>
>
> On Tue, Feb 1, 2011 at 1:26 AM, serialhex <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > +1http://rubybestpractices.com/i'm really enjoying reading this book,
> > the
> > pdf is a permanent tab in chrome for me. *I'm learning a lot from this
> > book!

>
> > i have both the 2nd & 3rd editions of the pickaxe (rb 1.8 & 1.9 resp.
> > *technically i also have access to the first - online for free) *i love it
> > for the reference. *i cant seem to get over needing a *physical* bookto
> > turn pages on. *and the fact that i can browse the std lib just by flipping
> > pages. *linkage:http://pragprog.com/titles/ruby3/programming-ruby-1-9

>
> > <http://pragprog.com/titles/ruby3/programming-ruby-1-9>i rather like the
> > ruby cookbook by o'reillyhttp://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596523695. *it's
> > helped me learn a number of things that some people just *assume* you know.
> > *though i'm sure one can learn alot thats in this book by googling or
> > looking up source, having this much info at your fingertips is worth the
> > $50
> > IMO. *unfortunately it dosnt cover ruby 1.9 & if your an experienced
> > developer it probably wont be much help, but for someone just starting i do
> > recommend it.

>
> > recently i found a book called clever algorithms
> >http://www.cleveralgorithms.com/and while it's more aimed toward people
> > dealing with optimization problems & A.I. all of the example code is
> > written
> > in ruby (not in a very ruby-ish way, but it's minimalist implementations of
> > the algorithms). *this book isn't necessarily for everybody, but for those
> > interested in A.I. & such it's really cool. *AND it's free (print version
> > ~$20). *(this especially rocks cause i found it on my B-day - which was
> > saturday, and A.I. is my main field of interest, so a ruby book dealing
> > with
> > A.I. thats free on my B-day... who could pass that up??)

>
> > lastly, the book that **REALLY** got me interested in ruby is why's
> > (poignant) guide to ruby (http://mislav.uniqpath.com/poignant-guide/is
> > the
> > first archive i found, they're all over) and really helped me learn ruby
> > when i was first starting out. *i highly recommend it to anybody who hasn't
> > read it just because it's a very interesting artistic work (if nothing
> > else)
> > and an interesting way to learn a programming language. *i'd really like
> > more intro-to-this-language books like this.

>
> > that's really it for me. *next?

>
> > hex

>
> > On Mon, Jan 31, 2011 at 6:46 PM, James Nathan <(E-Mail Removed)
> > >wrote:

>
> > > I have Beginning Ruby and Beginning Rails. but no training as a

> > programmers
> > > the real world do not want to help us with the questions about Ruby
> > > James

>
> > > --- On Mon, 1/31/11, Anurag Priyam <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
> > > From: Anurag Priyam <(E-Mail Removed)>
> > > Subject: Re: 2011: Which Ruby books have you read? And which would you
> > > recommend?
> > > To: "ruby-talk ML" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> > > Date: Monday, January 31, 2011, 1:24 PM

>
> > > > I know there are a lot of threads about books, but some of them areas
> > > > old as 2006 - and I think it would be nice to get a more up to date

> > list
> > > > of hot Ruby books, especially for anyone interested in learning the
> > > > latest version of Ruby, 1.9 (it's still ok to recommend older booksif
> > > > you feel they are still relevant).

>
> > > Makes sense .

>
> > > > I for one will be very eager to see which of the books you have read

> > you
> > > > have 'fallen in love with' - they're the ones I will most likely get
> > > > first

>
> > > I have read, and absolutely love "The Ruby Programming Language" by
> > > Flannagan and Matz, and "Ruby Best Practices" by Gregory Brown. While
> > > the former serves as a fantastic reference, the later deals with Ruby
> > > programming practices in real projects and picking up a lot or Ruby
> > > idioms.

>
> > > Another interesting book that I had a chance to lay my hands on was
> > > "Practical Ruby Projects" by Topher Cyll. I found it more fun than
> > > practical; even the author sub-titles it "ideas for the eclectic
> > > programmer". It deals with things like: generating SVG animations,
> > > implementing Lisp in Ruby (loved this chapter), creating music with
> > > MIDI, Mac OS X GUI, Genetic Algorithms. Would suggest reading it in
> > > leisure time, or at an intermediate level.

>
> > > Hal Fulton's "The Ruby Way" is another book that I have read. It was
> > > the first Ruby book that I bought as The Pickaxe was way expensive in
> > > India back then. I was able to learn a good deal from it as a
> > > beginner. I would not recommend it though (not even to a beginner) as
> > > you can learn the same thing (without paying for the book) from the
> > > Ruby documentation, or Google. For the same reasons, I think it has
> > > lost much of its significance now.

>
> > > I have done some light reading on "Enterprise Integration with Ruby",
> > > and "Practical Ruby for System Administration". They contain some
> > > decent examples, but have a very beginner-ish and closed feeling to
> > > it. I don't think that they don't teach you anything concrete, rather
> > > gives you the answer to some closed form problems that you could have
> > > come up with (think, google, think, implement) with any way.

>
> > > Some books that have got good reviews, and I am looking forward to
> > > read (waiting for cheaper Indian reprint to come out ) are "Design
> > > Patterns in Ruby", and "Refactoring - Ruby Edition". I think these
> > > books are relevant as they teach you something concrete - patterns,
> > > styles, and practices that you can apply, and reapply to different
> > > problems later. Would refrain from commenting more as I have not
> > > actually read them.

>
> > > tl;dr - Learn Ruby by reading "The Ruby Programming Language" while
> > > get better at it by writing, and reading a lot of code (FOSS, fun
> > > projects, rewriting class room assignments in Ruby). And yeah, "Ruby
> > > Best Practices is excellent, and free (I love advertising it ).

>
> > > --
> > > Anurag Priyam
> > >http://about.me/yeban/

>
>


This question asked many many times over. check the old threads
 
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Aston J.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-01-2011
/Thanks for the replies everyone - keep them coming!/

I forgot to mention I have also read 'Learn to Program' by Chris Pine.
It really inspired me to learn the language - and made me feel like 'I
can do it!'. If you're new to programming it is a must read! You can
read the older version for free here: http://pine.fm/LearnToProgram or
buy an updated version.

I have also started to read Design Patterns in Ruby - only started it
last night but loving it already! Will post updated thoughts when I
finish it.

James (blackdeath) - there are some great tips in this thread already,
don't lose hope. Read Learn to Program in the link above - it will raise
your spirits and show you that there are actually lots of people willing
to teach you this amazing language

--
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.

 
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Aston J.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-28-2011
I finished Design Patterns in Ruby by Russ Olsen - what a great book,
highly recommended! It doesn't teach you Ruby, but rather how to use it.
Really is a great book and one I will probably read again.

I have now started Eloquent Ruby, which is by the same author. Only got
to chapter 6 but loving this book already. It's a great book for those
who have already learnt the basics of Ruby, as it teaches you the Ruby
way, the way Rubyists are likely to use Ruby. I'll post an update when
I've finished it.

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Aston J.
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      03-14-2011
Finished Eloquent Ruby the other day - another great book from Russ
Olsen, well worth a read!

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