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Serious danger of being impressed

 
 
Mark Carter
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      06-10-2007
I'm mostly into Python, and decided to have a go at writing a little
accounts package (in python on OS X). It worked in its primitive way,
and I was looking to take it to the next level.

I decided that sqlite was the way to go. For some reason I couldn't get
sqlite3 and the python module to work properly - it didn't seem to
commit the data to the database consistently.

So I thought, what the hell, I'll try Ruby. I switched over to Ubuntu,
because it seemed a bit easier than OS X. First impressions: oh man! The
sqlite package worked fine, and I came across rsqlitegui, which I can
use to inspect the database when coding isn't required.

I think Ruby is a serious serious contender for python.

I'm also in two minds as to whether I should try to switch over from OS
X permanently. I'm new to iMacs, and I have to say that OS X has a nice
polish to it; but then Ubuntu, gotta love those repositories.
 
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Sam Smoot
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      06-10-2007
On Jun 10, 10:15 am, Mark Carter <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I'm mostly into Python, and decided to have a go at writing a little
> accounts package (in python on OS X). It worked in its primitive way,
> and I was looking to take it to the next level.
>
> I decided that sqlite was the way to go. For some reason I couldn't get
> sqlite3 and the python module to work properly - it didn't seem to
> commit the data to the database consistently.
>
> So I thought, what the hell, I'll try Ruby. I switched over to Ubuntu,
> because it seemed a bit easier than OS X. First impressions: oh man! The
> sqlite package worked fine, and I came across rsqlitegui, which I can
> use to inspect the database when coding isn't required.
>
> I think Ruby is a serious serious contender for python.
>
> I'm also in two minds as to whether I should try to switch over from OS
> X permanently. I'm new to iMacs, and I have to say that OS X has a nice
> polish to it; but then Ubuntu, gotta love those repositories.


There's a few sore spots on the Mac, but I find MacPorts does the
trick most
of the time.

port install ruby rb-rubygems rb-sqlite3

That should do the trick as long as you don't mind the /opt/lib file
structure.

I always modify my ~/.profile as well to include:

export RUBYLIB="/opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/"
export RUBYOPT="rubygems"

I just don't like having to manually require 'ruby_gems'

Sure it's not perfect, but MacPorts means I've never had to think
twice about the notoriously difficult RMagick install:

port install rb-rmagick

It's no apt-get, but I'll leave that to the servers. Trade in OS X for
Ubuntu? For me that'd be tough. Kubuntu maybe. Kate is second only
to TextMate IMO.

Either way you decide to go, good luck!

 
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Just Another Victim of the Ambient Morality
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-10-2007

"Mark Carter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:466c1597$0$27859$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> I think Ruby is a serious serious contender for python.


As a language, Ruby has always been "a serious contender" for Python.
Personally, I like it a lot more than Python.
The main advantage of Python over Ruby is a larger library and (more
importantly, since there is a rich library for Ruby) a much more mature
implementation. Sadly, Python is, really, just as powerful a language as
Ruby, so this gives people every reason to use Python over Ruby, so it would
help Ruby to work on these things...
What is the state of Ruby development, does anyone know? The impression
that I get is that it's slow and diluted across multiple, parallel
efforts...



 
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Chad Perrin
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-10-2007
On Mon, Jun 11, 2007 at 12:20:12AM +0900, Mark Carter wrote:
> I'm mostly into Python, and decided to have a go at writing a little
> accounts package (in python on OS X). It worked in its primitive way,
> and I was looking to take it to the next level.
>
> I decided that sqlite was the way to go. For some reason I couldn't get
> sqlite3 and the python module to work properly - it didn't seem to
> commit the data to the database consistently.
>
> So I thought, what the hell, I'll try Ruby. I switched over to Ubuntu,
> because it seemed a bit easier than OS X. First impressions: oh man! The
> sqlite package worked fine, and I came across rsqlitegui, which I can
> use to inspect the database when coding isn't required.
>
> I think Ruby is a serious serious contender for python.
>
> I'm also in two minds as to whether I should try to switch over from OS
> X permanently. I'm new to iMacs, and I have to say that OS X has a nice
> polish to it; but then Ubuntu, gotta love those repositories.


If you like Ubuntu's repositories, you should check out Debian's -- much
more extensive, and generally conducive to a more stable system, too.

Similar in extensiveness is FreeBSD's ports collection -- and even *more*
conducive to stability than Debian's repositories. That's hard to beat.

Both Debian and FreeBSD tend to work best for people who are willing and
able to make their own decisions, however, more than people who want
something "easy". Ubuntu is far more suited to the average MS Windows
transplant, I suppose.

The above is just one curmudgeonly free unix hacker's opinion, of course.

--
CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
W. Somerset Maugham: "The ability to quote is a serviceable substitute for
wit."

 
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M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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      06-11-2007
Chad Perrin wrote:
> If you like Ubuntu's repositories, you should check out Debian's -- much
> more extensive, and generally conducive to a more stable system, too.
>
> Similar in extensiveness is FreeBSD's ports collection -- and even *more*
> conducive to stability than Debian's repositories. That's hard to beat.
>
> Both Debian and FreeBSD tend to work best for people who are willing and
> able to make their own decisions, however, more than people who want
> something "easy". Ubuntu is far more suited to the average MS Windows
> transplant, I suppose.
>
> The above is just one curmudgeonly free unix hacker's opinion, of course.
>


And Gentoo Linux is a good compromise between FreeBSD's ports and
Debian's repositories. Gentoo's Portage actually descended from ports.

As far as stability is concerned, Debian stable (currently called Etch)
is probably as stable as FreeBSD and I think *more* stable than Red Hat
Enterprise or the RHEL clones.

But I will stick with Gentoo for Ruby. Except when the Gentoo devs don't
get prodded from the Ruby community, a Ruby release shows up in Portage
within a day or so. They have jRuby 1.0 RC1 the last time I synced,
which was yesterday, for example. And they have more gems than Debian, I
think.

 
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darren kirby
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      06-11-2007
quoth the M. Edward (Ed) Borasky:

> And Gentoo Linux is a good compromise between FreeBSD's ports and
> Debian's repositories. Gentoo's Portage actually descended from ports.


Really? Like as in, Linux descended from Unix? Or in some direct fashion? I
always thought portage was an 'homage' to ports, so to speak.

<snip>

> But I will stick with Gentoo for Ruby. Except when the Gentoo devs don't
> get prodded from the Ruby community, a Ruby release shows up in Portage
> within a day or so. They have jRuby 1.0 RC1 the last time I synced,
> which was yesterday, for example. And they have more gems than Debian, I
> think.


The paludis devs are currently working on direct support for gems
repositories. Once this is complete we will have direct support for all gems,
without having to wait for them to become ebuilds (not that writing an ebuild
for a gem isn't trivial...)

Very cool...

-d
--
darren kirby :: Part of the problem since 1976 :: http://badcomputer.org
"...the number of UNIX installations has grown to 10, with more expected..."
- Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson, June 1972

 
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John Joyce
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-11-2007

On Jun 10, 2007, at 1:48 PM, Chad Perrin wrote:

> On Mon, Jun 11, 2007 at 12:20:12AM +0900, Mark Carter wrote:
>> I'm mostly into Python, and decided to have a go at writing a little
>> accounts package (in python on OS X). It worked in its primitive way,
>> and I was looking to take it to the next level.
>>
>> I decided that sqlite was the way to go. For some reason I
>> couldn't get
>> sqlite3 and the python module to work properly - it didn't seem to
>> commit the data to the database consistently.
>>
>> So I thought, what the hell, I'll try Ruby. I switched over to
>> Ubuntu,
>> because it seemed a bit easier than OS X. First impressions: oh
>> man! The
>> sqlite package worked fine, and I came across rsqlitegui, which I can
>> use to inspect the database when coding isn't required.
>>
>> I think Ruby is a serious serious contender for python.
>>
>> I'm also in two minds as to whether I should try to switch over
>> from OS
>> X permanently. I'm new to iMacs, and I have to say that OS X has a
>> nice
>> polish to it; but then Ubuntu, gotta love those repositories.

>
> If you like Ubuntu's repositories, you should check out Debian's --
> much
> more extensive, and generally conducive to a more stable system, too.
>
> Similar in extensiveness is FreeBSD's ports collection -- and even
> *more*
> conducive to stability than Debian's repositories. That's hard to
> beat.
>
> Both Debian and FreeBSD tend to work best for people who are
> willing and
> able to make their own decisions, however, more than people who want
> something "easy". Ubuntu is far more suited to the average MS Windows
> transplant, I suppose.
>
> The above is just one curmudgeonly free unix hacker's opinion, of
> course.
>
> --
> CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
> W. Somerset Maugham: "The ability to quote is a serviceable
> substitute for
> wit."
>

Ubunut is a Debian Linux.



 
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Chad Perrin
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-11-2007
On Mon, Jun 11, 2007 at 03:42:03PM +0900, John Joyce wrote:
> On Jun 10, 2007, at 1:48 PM, Chad Perrin wrote:
> >
> >If you like Ubuntu's repositories, you should check out Debian's --
> >much
> >more extensive, and generally conducive to a more stable system, too.
> >
> >Similar in extensiveness is FreeBSD's ports collection -- and even
> >*more*
> >conducive to stability than Debian's repositories. That's hard to
> >beat.
> >
> >Both Debian and FreeBSD tend to work best for people who are
> >willing and
> >able to make their own decisions, however, more than people who want
> >something "easy". Ubuntu is far more suited to the average MS Windows
> >transplant, I suppose.
> >
> >The above is just one curmudgeonly free unix hacker's opinion, of
> >course.
> >

> Ubunut is a Debian Linux.


Ubuntu is a Debian *fork*. It has less in common with Debian itself than
PC-BSD and DesktopBSD have in common with FreeBSD, and may even have less
in common with Debian than Dragonfly BSD has with FreeBSD.

In fact, measured within the context of Linux distributions, about the
only thing it meaningfully has in common with Debian is the
under-the-hood package management software it uses (namely, DPKG and
APT).

--
CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
awj @reddit: "The terms never and always are never always true."

 
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Dick Davies
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-11-2007
Ok, thanks for the advert. Debian has its own problems, but this isn't
the place to discuss them.

On 11/06/07, Chad Perrin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Ubuntu is a Debian *fork*.


--
Rasputin :: Jack of All Trades - Master of Nuns
http://number9.hellooperator.net/

 
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Eleanor McHugh
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-11-2007
On 10 Jun 2007, at 19:48, Chad Perrin wrote:
> On Mon, Jun 11, 2007 at 12:20:12AM +0900, Mark Carter wrote:
>> I'm also in two minds as to whether I should try to switch over
>> from OS
>> X permanently. I'm new to iMacs, and I have to say that OS X has a
>> nice
>> polish to it; but then Ubuntu, gotta love those repositories.

>
> If you like Ubuntu's repositories, you should check out Debian's --
> much
> more extensive, and generally conducive to a more stable system, too.
>
> Similar in extensiveness is FreeBSD's ports collection -- and even
> *more*
> conducive to stability than Debian's repositories. That's hard to
> beat.
>
> Both Debian and FreeBSD tend to work best for people who are
> willing and
> able to make their own decisions, however, more than people who want
> something "easy". Ubuntu is far more suited to the average MS Windows
> transplant, I suppose.


I must admit that since swapping to FreeBSD last year I find using
most Linux distros unnecessarily cumbersome and increasingly user
friendly in the same way as Windows. But OS X is also a damn pleasant
platform to use and I probably do more of my Ruby development work on
it than I do on FreeBSD - TextMate alone makes it hugely productive!
Ubuntu would be the platform that I'd recommend to a Windows user
looking to get into Linux as a user, and Gentoo if they really want
to deep geek how a Linux system hangs together


Ellie

Eleanor McHugh
Games With Brains
----
raise ArgumentError unless @reality.responds_to? :reason



 
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