Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Programming > Ruby > [Offtopic] Learning Japanese

Reply
Thread Tools

[Offtopic] Learning Japanese

 
 
Gerardo Santana Gómez Garrido
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-20-2007
Thanks to Ruby I've learned a lot recently about programming languages
and it has widen my universe of things I want to learn. These things
include Japanese.

I've compiled a set of URLs to sites of Japanese tutorials.
Pronunciation seems easy, from my Spanish background, and even though
I'm confident I can teach myself Japanese, I also think that learning
it with the help of another human would be nicer, especially if she is
a nice Japanese girl

The questions are, what was your approach for learning Japanese? Did
it work? What would you recommend?

Thanks.

--
Gerardo Santana

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Harry
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-20-2007
What would you recommend?
>
> Thanks.
>
> --
> Gerardo Santana
>
>

Maybe you have seen this. But if not, take a look. There is alot of
information here.
http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/japanese.html

Harry


--
http://www.kakueki.com/ruby/list.html

Diplomacy is the art of saying "Nice doggie" until you can find a rock.
Will Rogers

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
James Edward Gray II
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-20-2007
On Jan 19, 2007, at 6:43 PM, Greg Pederson wrote:

> I don't know Japanese, only a couple of expressions that I learned
> when I
> was traveling to Japan for work, but I'd maybe recommend trying
> Rosetta
> Stone <http://www.rosettastone.com/en/individuals/languages/japanese>


I use the Rosetta Stone, for Japanese, and love it.

James Edward Gray II

 
Reply With Quote
 
Suraj Kurapati
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-20-2007
Gerardo Santana Gómez Garrido wrote:
> what was your approach for learning Japanese? Did it work?
> What would you recommend?


I just watched lots and lots of Japanese anime with English subtitles.


It is a good approach *in addition* to your usual study of the language
because it helps you learn the culture through immersion... I cannot
afford to visit Japan, so anime is the next best thing.

--
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.

 
Reply With Quote
 
h4lfl1ng
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-20-2007

Some good resources are podcasts. Here are some of the things I use.

http://www.japanesepod101.com/
http://www.japancast.net
http://japanese-online.com

Most of the sites also have a membership fee if you want to go in deeper. I
haven't applied for any, but I think it would be worth it.



Gerardo Santana G=C3=B3mez Garrido wrote:
>=20
> Thanks to Ruby I've learned a lot recently about programming languages
> and it has widen my universe of things I want to learn. These things
> include Japanese.
>=20
> I've compiled a set of URLs to sites of Japanese tutorials.
> Pronunciation seems easy, from my Spanish background, and even though
> I'm confident I can teach myself Japanese, I also think that learning
> it with the help of another human would be nicer, especially if she is
> a nice Japanese girl
>=20
> The questions are, what was your approach for learning Japanese? Did
> it work? What would you recommend?
>=20
> Thanks.
>=20
> --=20
> Gerardo Santana
>=20
>=20
>=20


--=20
View this message in context: http://www.nabble.com/-Offtopic--Learning-Jap=
anese-tf3043348.html#a8461997
Sent from the ruby-talk mailing list archive at Nabble.com.


 
Reply With Quote
 
Tomasz Wegrzanowski
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-20-2007
On 1/20/07, Gerardo Santana G=F3mez Garrido <(E-Mail Removed)> wro=
te:
> Thanks to Ruby I've learned a lot recently about programming languages
> and it has widen my universe of things I want to learn. These things
> include Japanese.
>
> I've compiled a set of URLs to sites of Japanese tutorials.
> Pronunciation seems easy, from my Spanish background, and even though
> I'm confident I can teach myself Japanese, I also think that learning
> it with the help of another human would be nicer, especially if she is
> a nice Japanese girl
>
> The questions are, what was your approach for learning Japanese? Did
> it work? What would you recommend?


It's not total beginner level (you should at least know kana), but if you
get kanji skills in a quick and fun way, check jrpg [ http://zabor.org/jrpg=
/ ].

And yeah, it's coded in Python :-p

--=20
Tomasz Wegrzanowski [ http://t-a-w.blogspot.com/ ]

 
Reply With Quote
 
Gerardo Santana Gómez Garrido
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-21-2007
Thank you everybody for your help. Hope to be able to thank you again
some day in Japanese.

--
Gerardo Santana

 
Reply With Quote
 
Zev Blut
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-22-2007
On Sat, 20 Jan 2007 09:03:25 +0900, Gerardo Santana Gómez Garrido
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Thanks to Ruby I've learned a lot recently about programming languages
> and it has widen my universe of things I want to learn. These things
> include Japanese.


< Snip >

> The questions are, what was your approach for learning Japanese? Did
> it work? What would you recommend?


It all depends upon how you learn, although there are a few techniques
I can highly recommend:

*) Learn Hiragana and Katakana, do not spend much time on Romanji.
Doing this will really help you pronunciation, plus it will help
you out a bit if you go to Japan.

*) Take a course at your local university / community college.

*) Go to Japan.


I took Japanese at university as my language requirement. I found the
beginning grammar so much easier and different than the other
languages I studied that I really enjoyed studying it. From that I
decided that I did not want to what I learned to go to waste so I
managed to find a way to work in Japan.

Good luck!
Zev

 
Reply With Quote
 
Damian Terentyev
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-22-2007
Good day!

On Jan 20, 2007, at 03:03, Gerardo Santana G=C3=B3mez Garrido wrote:

> The questions are, what was your approach for learning Japanese? Did
> it work? What would you recommend?


After learning kana I recommend to learn kanji with "Remembering Kanji"=20=

by JW Heisig or maybe you have a Spanish book that uses a similar=20
approach (I've done well with Russian book "The Way of a Bird Without=20
Tail" =E2=80=94 the idea is to use imagination for mnemonics of kanji).
I've been learning Japanese by myself for two years but considering my=20=

laziness I ended with poor vocabulary and about 400 kanji (I didn't=20
have Heisig's book then) though good grammar. Now I somewhat stopped=20
but I think I'm going to continue my study if I have an opportunity to=20=

find a native Japanese speaker. It's hard to master colloquial speech=20
without that.

Your sincerely,
Damian/Three-eyed Fish=


 
Reply With Quote
 
Daniel DeLorme
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-23-2007
Suraj Kurapati wrote:
> Gerardo Santana Gómez Garrido wrote:
>> what was your approach for learning Japanese? Did it work?
>> What would you recommend?

>
> I just watched lots and lots of Japanese anime with English subtitles.
>
>
> It is a good approach *in addition* to your usual study of the language
> because it helps you learn the culture through immersion... I cannot
> afford to visit Japan, so anime is the next best thing.


I did that too but now all my Japanese friends tell me I speak like an
anime character.

Can't win 'em all...

Daniel

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[I'm learning C]: Learning to use ucontext Andrey Popp C Programming 5 01-31-2012 01:05 AM
Learning C and Learning Make/Configure/Building/Linking Hal Vaughan C Programming 7 03-21-2006 05:07 PM
e-learning, (collaborative learning environment) collinm Java 1 09-08-2005 09:52 PM
A new japanese dictionary and learning tool in Ruby Mathieu Blondel Ruby 0 06-20-2005 05:40 PM
Response.AddHeader corrupts Japanese/chinese characters when writing outputstrea Joseph ASP .Net 2 12-31-2003 12:48 PM



Advertisments