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Desktop apps written in Ruby?

 
 
petermichaux@yahoo.com
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      02-18-2006
Hi,

I've only used Ruby in the Rails framework. How about using Ruby to
build desktop apps with fancy drag and drop GUI with directory trees
and tabbed panes etc. Can such an app be developed as easily or easier
than with Java/Swing?

It looks like Tk is used for Ruby GUI. Is Tk as advanced as Swing?

What sort of desktop app frameworks are their for Ruby?

Thanks,
Peter

 
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Wilson Bilkovich
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      02-18-2006
On 2/17/06, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I've only used Ruby in the Rails framework. How about using Ruby to
> build desktop apps with fancy drag and drop GUI with directory trees
> and tabbed panes etc. Can such an app be developed as easily or easier
> than with Java/Swing?
>
> It looks like Tk is used for Ruby GUI. Is Tk as advanced as Swing?
>
> What sort of desktop app frameworks are their for Ruby?
>


GTK and Qt are the most feature-rich Ruby-compatible frameworks, but
there are many others (wxWidgets, Fox, Tk, etc.)
Ruby/Qt even has a nice book now:
http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/t...yqt/index.html


 
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petermichaux@yahoo.com
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      02-18-2006
Thanks for the reply. From that QTRuby link "to create cross-platform
GUI applications for Linux and OS X in Ruby". Unfortunately I will need
to support Windows XP. Sounds like QTRuby can't do that. True?

Peter

 
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tsumeruby@tsumelabs.com
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      02-18-2006
On Saturday 18 February 2006 12:49 pm, Wilson Bilkovich wrote:
> GTK and Qt are the most feature-rich Ruby-compatible frameworks, but
> there are many others (wxWidgets, Fox, Tk, etc.)
> Ruby/Qt even has a nice book now:
> http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/t...yqt/index.html


The toolkits are feature complete yes, but what matters is how frozen and
stable each is for programming. ruby/tk is by far the most frozen and mature.
ruby-gtk2 is frozen as well. qtruby's usage seems to be in a state of flux,
but is stable to use. Others really don't match up due to base toolkit
version which is bound doens't have UTF availability, frozen API, or
incomplete bindings.

Tsume


 
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tsumeruby@tsumelabs.com
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      02-18-2006
On Saturday 18 February 2006 01:08 pm, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> Thanks for the reply. From that QTRuby link "to create cross-platform
> GUI applications for Linux and OS X in Ruby". Unfortunately I will need
> to support Windows XP. Sounds like QTRuby can't do that. True?
>
> Peter


Unfortunately, there isn't a stable windows build, they've been working on it.
I believe you should just use ruby-gtk, or ruby/tk(with tile. makes native
widgets with tk) More information about Tile in the following email to
ruby-talk.

http://blade.nagaokaut.ac.jp/cgi-bin...by-talk/180329

I described just about all the important facts about Tk, and would be an
excellent choice if you can learn to use the API efficiently.

I've used FOX, and even used fxruby for a very long time. There are great
downfalls which made me use another toolkit. FOX is useless to me for having
no decent UTF support, even though the support is slowly coming along.
Ruby/GTK2 would be a good solution, especially if you're going to run the
applications on unix, scim-gtk2-immodule is _very_ useful. I use GNOME, so
creating GTK/GNOME based apps over Tk is a plus for me.

Tsume


 
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tsumeruby@tsumelabs.com
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      02-18-2006
On Saturday 18 February 2006 02:21 pm, Scott Weeks wrote:
> Why not just build the front end of the app in a windows language
> (C++,VB,...) and then expose the APIs so that you can build the
> business logic in Ruby?
>


Well, you are welcomed to use the Windows C API to build your applications,
however designing the application might be a task.

> Honestly as good as Ruby is for so many things it's not the language to
> be building GUI's in. TK and QT etc... always feel clunky compared to
> native windows or mac apps. I know there's a Ruby- Objective C bridge
> for the Mac but I don't know what's available for windows.
>


Many developers writing software for other operating systems feel the APIs
used to write GUI based software with GTK, QT, and Tk are very suitable. Of
course people care about look, but if look is so important you want to
capture the exact feel, then the programmer should be using the
supported/managed languages for the specified OS. Windows would be using
the .NET languages. On MacOSX Objective-C, the application language, should
be used to write software. However, users don't expect native look, they
expect a easy to use interface. Sure, you've read the articles on how making
your own pixmap GUI interface renders the program useless, but only because
people have been writing about the interfaces which fail. The only person who
is accountable for making a bad interface is the programmer itself. There are
several pixmaps interfaces which work very well. I know printers now have the
LCD when you want to perform some task, those are well designed GUI
interfaces. There is the Jasc photo imaging software meant for the user,
TheraWriter.PT is another good example which doesn't use standard GUI
guidelines, Dentrix is another great example for having a decent mouse based
interface to describe the teeth of a patient. Native look has absolutely
nothing to do with making a good application, just a convenience. Even using
a toolkit like WideStudio, a good application interface may be created. I
believe many programmers try blame the software on bad interfaces, when the
one accountable is the programmer itself.

Tsume


 
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Gregory Brown
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      02-18-2006
On 2/18/06, (E-Mail Removed) <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> guidelines, Dentrix is another great example for having a decent mouse ba=

sed
> interface to describe the teeth of a patient.


Teeth sure. Everything else... forget it!

Dentrix looks like newspaper shavings and toothpaste and oil mixed together=
 
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Tsume
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      02-18-2006
On Sat, 2006-02-18 at 18:11 +0900, Gregory Brown wrote:
> On 2/18/06, (E-Mail Removed) <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > guidelines, Dentrix is another great example for having a decent mouse based
> > interface to describe the teeth of a patient.

>
> Teeth sure. Everything else... forget it!
>
> Dentrix looks like newspaper shavings and toothpaste and oil mixed together.
> ( We've got a C#/Ruby frontend to our Dentrix database backend to
> spare our clients the pain that is Dentrix )
>
> In fact... some of that is what Ruport is designed for. Reporting on
> dentrix / dx1 crud.
>


What pain have you had with Dentrix? Did it drill a hole in the users
heads? The interface looks rather nice and easy to use, also the third
party software for the xray machine works wonders, which works very well
with dentrix. The only part I dislike about dentrix is the restriction
for ease of use is demolished if the patient information has not been
entered by the receptionist. When there were dental assistants trying to
chart someones mouth, they were freaking out when right click, chart
didn't work. Tsume to the rescue, aka. Wonder Boy!

Tsume



 
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Gregory Brown
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      02-18-2006
On 2/18/06, Tsume <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
> What pain have you had with Dentrix? Did it drill a hole in the users
> heads? The interface looks rather nice and easy to use, also the third
> party software for the xray machine works wonders, which works very well
> with dentrix. The only part I dislike about dentrix is the restriction
> for ease of use is demolished if the patient information has not been
> entered by the receptionist. When there were dental assistants trying to
> chart someones mouth, they were freaking out when right click, chart
> didn't work. Tsume to the rescue, aka. Wonder Boy!


You haven't peeked at the database... have you?


 
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Tsume
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      02-18-2006
On Sat, 2006-02-18 at 23:23 +0900, Gregory Brown wrote:
> On 2/18/06, Tsume <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >
> > What pain have you had with Dentrix? Did it drill a hole in the users
> > heads? The interface looks rather nice and easy to use, also the third
> > party software for the xray machine works wonders, which works very well
> > with dentrix. The only part I dislike about dentrix is the restriction
> > for ease of use is demolished if the patient information has not been
> > entered by the receptionist. When there were dental assistants trying to
> > chart someones mouth, they were freaking out when right click, chart
> > didn't work. Tsume to the rescue, aka. Wonder Boy!

>
> You haven't peeked at the database... have you?
>


Well, no. Supposedly its huge. I probably shouldn't look.

Tsume



 
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