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can you recommend some easy ruby project for newbie?

 
 
nonocast
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      11-06-2005
i am a ruby newbie
i learn something from ruby-lang.org & rubyonrails.com
but it's only syntax.
i want to learn more about project written by ruby.
thanks.
 
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nbaker2328@charter.net
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      11-06-2005

nonocast wrote:
> i am a ruby newbie
> i learn something from ruby-lang.org & rubyonrails.com
> but it's only syntax.
> i want to learn more about project written by ruby.
> thanks.


These are suggestions I found in a Python forum:

http://www.daniweb.com/techtalkforum...ad32007-1.html

Have fun!

Nathan.

 
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nonocast
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      11-06-2005
thanks Nathan.
but it's all about python
i want to read some ruby code
it doesn't very large.just a small program.
something like rails is too complex to me.
i am a newbie.i want to know how to start.



<(E-Mail Removed)> ????
news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
>
> nonocast wrote:
> > i am a ruby newbie
> > i learn something from ruby-lang.org & rubyonrails.com
> > but it's only syntax.
> > i want to learn more about project written by ruby.
> > thanks.

>
> These are suggestions I found in a Python forum:
>
> http://www.daniweb.com/techtalkforum...ad32007-1.html
>
> Have fun!
>
> Nathan.
>
>



 
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Trans
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      11-06-2005
Ruby Quizes are a great way to learn.

http://www.rubyquiz.com/

T.

 
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William Ramirez
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      11-06-2005
------=_Part_30146_468187.1131257519061
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Disposition: inline

I took a glance at Nathan's list, and most seem general enough to apply to
Ruby.

Personally, I like to pick small, personal projects to learn a new language=
 
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Bill Kelly
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      11-06-2005
Hi,

From: "nonocast" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>
> i want to read some ruby code
> it doesn't very large.just a small program.
> something like rails is too complex to me.
> i am a newbie.i want to know how to start.


If rails is too complex, you could flip to the other
end of the spectrum, and experiment with a "hello world"
program using the CGI library. This might be helpful,
on the supposition that learning some CGI basics should
give some insight into what frameworks like Rails and
others are attempting to help make simpler.

The WEBrick HTTP server has been bundled with the
standard library since Ruby-1-8-0. This would allow you
to serve your own web pages on your local machine, to
develop your program and learn about CGI and web
programming. Because CGI is a standard protocol, CGI
programs that you develop using WEBrick will translate
to servers like Apache, so if you have an Internet
web host that supports Ruby (there are many to choose
from) your CGI programs developed on your local
computer using WEBrick, will run on the Internet, too.

If you want to store your data in a database, you have
options from the simple (Marshal/YAML -- built-in to
Ruby) to ActiveRecord or Og or other object-relational-
mapper services, as well as direct SQL database
connections via DBI, . . .

So you can start simple, but might find basic CGI
learning useful, if you're interested in web programming
and rails.

Just a thought

Regards,

Bill




 
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James Britt
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      11-06-2005
William Ramirez wrote:
> I took a glance at Nathan's list, and most seem general enough to apply to
> Ruby.
>
> Personally, I like to pick small, personal projects to learn a new language.
> I pick a repetitive task I do often and try to automate them. Your mileage
> may vary.


This is a good suggestion. The Ruby Quizzes may be a source of
interesting challenges, and the solutions are often good examples of
clever Ruby hacking, but motivation when learning is key, and starting
simple and expanding can be a good path.

Scratching your own itch, if even somewhat trivial, makes it personal.
You can start small, automate a simple task, and then add features and
try out better implementations over time.


James


--

http://www.ruby-doc.org - The Ruby Documentation Site
http://www.rubyxml.com - News, Articles, and Listings for Ruby & XML
http://www.rubystuff.com - The Ruby Store for Ruby Stuff
http://www.jamesbritt.com - Playing with Better Toys


 
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nonocast
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      11-06-2005
thanks for everybody
btw, is there any project for newbie to read?


"Bill Kelly" <(E-Mail Removed)> ????
news:002c01c5e29a$1979f0b0$6442a8c0@musicbox...
> Hi,
>
> From: "nonocast" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> >
> > i want to read some ruby code
> > it doesn't very large.just a small program.
> > something like rails is too complex to me.
> > i am a newbie.i want to know how to start.

>
> If rails is too complex, you could flip to the other
> end of the spectrum, and experiment with a "hello world"
> program using the CGI library. This might be helpful,
> on the supposition that learning some CGI basics should
> give some insight into what frameworks like Rails and
> others are attempting to help make simpler.
>
> The WEBrick HTTP server has been bundled with the
> standard library since Ruby-1-8-0. This would allow you
> to serve your own web pages on your local machine, to
> develop your program and learn about CGI and web
> programming. Because CGI is a standard protocol, CGI
> programs that you develop using WEBrick will translate
> to servers like Apache, so if you have an Internet
> web host that supports Ruby (there are many to choose
> from) your CGI programs developed on your local
> computer using WEBrick, will run on the Internet, too.
>
> If you want to store your data in a database, you have
> options from the simple (Marshal/YAML -- built-in to
> Ruby) to ActiveRecord or Og or other object-relational-
> mapper services, as well as direct SQL database
> connections via DBI, . . .
>
> So you can start simple, but might find basic CGI
> learning useful, if you're interested in web programming
> and rails.
>
> Just a thought
>
> Regards,
>
> Bill
>
>
>
>
>



 
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Jim
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      11-06-2005
There are several tutorials on the web. I like to fire up irb, and go
through them just for fun.

 
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Kevin Brown
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      11-06-2005
On Sunday 06 November 2005 01:07, nonocast wrote:
> thanks for everybody
> btw, is there any project for newbie to read?


I would say start with the online version of the pickaxe.

http://www.rubycentral.com/book/

This builds a (cheesy, but it works) example of a jukebox from scratch. It's
Ruby 1.6, but you'll find the basics are the same. Most of us on this list
own the second version of the book, it's GREAT.


 
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