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"Made In Japan" selling cache

 
 
tony cooper
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      01-19-2012
On Thu, 19 Jan 2012 01:18:10 +0100, Wolfgang Weisselberg
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>John Turco <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Bruce wrote:

>
>>> 'Made in Germany' still holds some value. Leica is keen to emphasise
>>> that its cameras are 'Made in Germany', however most manufacturing is
>>> done in Portugal, with final assembly and finishing in Germany.

>
>> "Made in Germany" means little more than "Made in U.S.A." does, these
>> days. The actual "guts" (electronics, especially) of most devices are
>> of Asian manufacture, regardless of their outer "skins" and/or labels.

>
>Both are true. However, there's currently a discussion whether
>"Made in Germany" should require at least a 50% of it actually
>made in Germany, instead of just assembled.
>


Much further back than "currently". When I visited some of my
suppliers of surgical instruments in Tuttlingen (Germany) in the 80s
there was quite a bit of concern about firms buying forgings in
Germany and sending them to Pakistan for finish and assembly. The
instruments were marked "Made in Germany".

Instruments finished and assembled in Pakistan are greatly inferior to
instruments finished in Germany. American customers thought that
German quality standards were declining when they used these
Pakistan-finished instruments.

Surgical scissors are the prime example. Good scissors are made with
the two halves joined with a screw so the scissors can be disassembled
to be sharpened evenly. The scissors assembled and finished in
Pakistan were joined with a pin and could not be disassembled.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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Wolfgang Weisselberg
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      02-06-2012
tony cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Thu, 19 Jan 2012 01:18:10 +0100, Wolfgang Weisselberg
>>John Turco <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> Bruce wrote:


>>> "Made in Germany" means little more than "Made in U.S.A." does, these
>>> days. The actual "guts" (electronics, especially) of most devices are
>>> of Asian manufacture, regardless of their outer "skins" and/or labels.


>>Both are true. However, there's currently a discussion whether
>>"Made in Germany" should require at least a 50% of it actually
>>made in Germany, instead of just assembled.


> Much further back than "currently". When I visited some of my
> suppliers of surgical instruments in Tuttlingen (Germany) in the 80s
> there was quite a bit of concern about firms buying forgings in
> Germany and sending them to Pakistan for finish and assembly. The
> instruments were marked "Made in Germany".


> Instruments finished and assembled in Pakistan are greatly inferior to
> instruments finished in Germany. American customers thought that
> German quality standards were declining when they used these
> Pakistan-finished instruments.


> Surgical scissors are the prime example. Good scissors are made with
> the two halves joined with a screw so the scissors can be disassembled
> to be sharpened evenly. The scissors assembled and finished in
> Pakistan were joined with a pin and could not be disassembled.


Completely different topic. Made in Germany means that the
final product is at least assembled here. So your scissors
would have bveen "Made in Pakistan".

BTW, I rate scissors as very simple, compared to, say,
computers and street building vehicles.

-Wolfgang
 
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tony cooper
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      02-06-2012
On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 08:50:12 +0100, Wolfgang Weisselberg
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>tony cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> On Thu, 19 Jan 2012 01:18:10 +0100, Wolfgang Weisselberg
>>>John Turco <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>> Bruce wrote:

>
>>>> "Made in Germany" means little more than "Made in U.S.A." does, these
>>>> days. The actual "guts" (electronics, especially) of most devices are
>>>> of Asian manufacture, regardless of their outer "skins" and/or labels.

>
>>>Both are true. However, there's currently a discussion whether
>>>"Made in Germany" should require at least a 50% of it actually
>>>made in Germany, instead of just assembled.

>
>> Much further back than "currently". When I visited some of my
>> suppliers of surgical instruments in Tuttlingen (Germany) in the 80s
>> there was quite a bit of concern about firms buying forgings in
>> Germany and sending them to Pakistan for finish and assembly. The
>> instruments were marked "Made in Germany".

>
>> Instruments finished and assembled in Pakistan are greatly inferior to
>> instruments finished in Germany. American customers thought that
>> German quality standards were declining when they used these
>> Pakistan-finished instruments.

>
>> Surgical scissors are the prime example. Good scissors are made with
>> the two halves joined with a screw so the scissors can be disassembled
>> to be sharpened evenly. The scissors assembled and finished in
>> Pakistan were joined with a pin and could not be disassembled.

>
>Completely different topic. Made in Germany means that the
>final product is at least assembled here. So your scissors
>would have bveen "Made in Pakistan".


Depends. I ascertained above that I was referring to American
customers. According to American law, the country of origin is the
country in which the majority of the manufacturing was done. The
importers were allowed to mark Pakistani-finished scissors "Made in
Germany" on the basis of the forgings being the majority of the
manufacturing process.

If German law deals with assembly, then German law is different from
American law. However, I think you're guessing.
>
>BTW, I rate scissors as very simple, compared to, say,
>computers and street building vehicles.
>
>-Wolfgang


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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Wolfgang Weisselberg
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      02-07-2012
tony cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 08:50:12 +0100, Wolfgang Weisselberg


>>Completely different topic. Made in Germany means that the
>>final product is at least assembled here. So your scissors
>>would have bveen "Made in Pakistan".


> Depends. I ascertained above that I was referring to American
> customers. According to American law, the country of origin is the
> country in which the majority of the manufacturing was done. The
> importers were allowed to mark Pakistani-finished scissors "Made in
> Germany" on the basis of the forgings being the majority of the
> manufacturing process.


> If German law deals with assembly, then German law is different from
> American law. However, I think you're guessing.


Not being a lawyer I am not allowed to give legal advise anyways.

Anyways, the mark (being of British origin anyways) isn't being
ruled by an explicit law, though the courts have spoken several
times about it. (There are of course general laws that disallow
misleading consumers --- which were not sufficient to let East
Germany not use the mark. Hence many then used "Made in West
Germany" instead.) The judges also ruled that important value
being added by assembling for example was enough ...)

And since Germany does not subscribe to the Anglo-American case
law system but in the Roman-European law tradition, case law has
a *much* lower influence.

-Wolfgang
 
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