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Response.Cookies bug

 
 
Mark
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-28-2005
Hi...

I've come across some weird bug with Response.Cookies. Or maybe it will be
called "by design" but for the life of me I can't figure out what purpose it
would serve. If you're setting a cookie (say Response.Cookies ("TEST")) and
you have a query string variable &test=x or &Test=x and you get
Request.QueryString to parse the query string, the cookie that gets dropped
matches the case of the query string, not what your code says. In other
words even though the code says Response.Cookies ("TEST"), it drops
Response.Cookies ("test") instead.

Anyone have any idea what's going on here? There's an example below. Try
it with http://127.0.0.1/cookieTest.asp?test=x and without the query string
variable.

<%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
<% var exp = new Date();
exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
exp.getUTCFullYear()

var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
%>

Thanks
_mark
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Mark Schupp
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-28-2005
2 problems.

Your question does not make any sense to me.
Your example page does not display anything.

Please restate the problem as clearly as possible with examples of the what
you expect to see that you are not seeing happen.

If possible, provide a sample page that displays the difference.

--
Mark Schupp
Head of Development
Integrity eLearning
www.ielearning.com


"Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi...
>
> I've come across some weird bug with Response.Cookies. Or maybe it will

be
> called "by design" but for the life of me I can't figure out what purpose

it
> would serve. If you're setting a cookie (say Response.Cookies ("TEST"))

and
> you have a query string variable &test=x or &Test=x and you get
> Request.QueryString to parse the query string, the cookie that gets

dropped
> matches the case of the query string, not what your code says. In other
> words even though the code says Response.Cookies ("TEST"), it drops
> Response.Cookies ("test") instead.
>
> Anyone have any idea what's going on here? There's an example below. Try
> it with http://127.0.0.1/cookieTest.asp?test=x and without the query

string
> variable.
>
> <%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> <% var exp = new Date();
> exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
> exp.getUTCFullYear()
>
> var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
> Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> %>
>
> Thanks
> _mark



 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Mark
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-28-2005
Sorry... The point is to look at the cookie-setting that is done in the
response. Adding a lot of code to dump out the current cookie state I
thought would gum up the example.

The main point is that given the code below, one would expect *always* to see

Set-Cookie: TEST=This+is+a+test; expires=Wed, 28-Feb-2007 05:00:00 GMT; path=/

as a header response for this page, since the name and case of the cookie is
a hard-coded literal value in the code. The bug in IIS is that if you have,
say, &test=x on your query string, IIS returns

Set-Cookie: test=This+is+a+test; expires=Wed, 28-Feb-2007 05:00:00 GMT; path=/

as the cookie setting (notice the case difference).

This is a problem because when you look for Request.Cookies on subsequent
page views, those *are* case sensative, so the fact that you're not setting
the cookie you think you are can cause a lot of problems.

The response header case-insensativity problem only seems to occur
a) when there a querystring variable exists with some other representation
of the name and
b) when the code uses Request.QueryString ("var") to get the Request object
to parse the query string. Note that you don't even have to be looking for
the variable (sort of) sharing the cookie name; anything to get Request to
parse the query string into a collection.

If you leave &test=x off of the url or if you take out the
var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
line, you get the first, correct cookie header as a response.

Thanks
_mark


"Mark Schupp" wrote:

> 2 problems.
>
> Your question does not make any sense to me.
> Your example page does not display anything.
>
> Please restate the problem as clearly as possible with examples of the what
> you expect to see that you are not seeing happen.
>
> If possible, provide a sample page that displays the difference.
>
> --
> Mark Schupp
> Head of Development
> Integrity eLearning
> www.ielearning.com
>
>
> "Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Hi...
> >
> > I've come across some weird bug with Response.Cookies. Or maybe it will

> be
> > called "by design" but for the life of me I can't figure out what purpose

> it
> > would serve. If you're setting a cookie (say Response.Cookies ("TEST"))

> and
> > you have a query string variable &test=x or &Test=x and you get
> > Request.QueryString to parse the query string, the cookie that gets

> dropped
> > matches the case of the query string, not what your code says. In other
> > words even though the code says Response.Cookies ("TEST"), it drops
> > Response.Cookies ("test") instead.
> >
> > Anyone have any idea what's going on here? There's an example below. Try
> > it with http://127.0.0.1/cookieTest.asp?test=x and without the query

> string
> > variable.
> >
> > <%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> > <% var exp = new Date();
> > exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> > var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
> > exp.getUTCFullYear()
> >
> > var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> > Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
> > Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> > %>
> >
> > Thanks
> > _mark

>
>
>

 
Reply With Quote
 
Mark Schupp
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-28-2005
possibly I am missing something (I'm not all that knowledgable about
cookies) but the cookie collection does not appear to be case-sensitive.

Running the below code gives the same value for "TEST" as for "test" on the
second request (all cookies were deleted first).

%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
<% var exp = new Date();
exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
exp.getUTCFullYear()

Response.Write( "TEST cookie:" + Request.Cookies("TEST") + "<br>" );
Response.Write( "test cookie:" + Request.Cookies("test") + "<br>" );

var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
%>


--
Mark Schupp
Head of Development
Integrity eLearning
www.ielearning.com


"Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Sorry... The point is to look at the cookie-setting that is done in the
> response. Adding a lot of code to dump out the current cookie state I
> thought would gum up the example.
>
> The main point is that given the code below, one would expect *always* to

see
>
> Set-Cookie: TEST=This+is+a+test; expires=Wed, 28-Feb-2007 05:00:00 GMT;

path=/
>
> as a header response for this page, since the name and case of the cookie

is
> a hard-coded literal value in the code. The bug in IIS is that if you

have,
> say, &test=x on your query string, IIS returns
>
> Set-Cookie: test=This+is+a+test; expires=Wed, 28-Feb-2007 05:00:00 GMT;

path=/
>
> as the cookie setting (notice the case difference).
>
> This is a problem because when you look for Request.Cookies on subsequent
> page views, those *are* case sensative, so the fact that you're not

setting
> the cookie you think you are can cause a lot of problems.
>
> The response header case-insensativity problem only seems to occur
> a) when there a querystring variable exists with some other representation
> of the name and
> b) when the code uses Request.QueryString ("var") to get the Request

object
> to parse the query string. Note that you don't even have to be looking

for
> the variable (sort of) sharing the cookie name; anything to get Request to
> parse the query string into a collection.
>
> If you leave &test=x off of the url or if you take out the
> var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> line, you get the first, correct cookie header as a response.
>
> Thanks
> _mark
>
>
> "Mark Schupp" wrote:
>
> > 2 problems.
> >
> > Your question does not make any sense to me.
> > Your example page does not display anything.
> >
> > Please restate the problem as clearly as possible with examples of the

what
> > you expect to see that you are not seeing happen.
> >
> > If possible, provide a sample page that displays the difference.
> >
> > --
> > Mark Schupp
> > Head of Development
> > Integrity eLearning
> > www.ielearning.com
> >
> >
> > "Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > Hi...
> > >
> > > I've come across some weird bug with Response.Cookies. Or maybe it

will
> > be
> > > called "by design" but for the life of me I can't figure out what

purpose
> > it
> > > would serve. If you're setting a cookie (say Response.Cookies

("TEST"))
> > and
> > > you have a query string variable &test=x or &Test=x and you get
> > > Request.QueryString to parse the query string, the cookie that gets

> > dropped
> > > matches the case of the query string, not what your code says. In

other
> > > words even though the code says Response.Cookies ("TEST"), it drops
> > > Response.Cookies ("test") instead.
> > >
> > > Anyone have any idea what's going on here? There's an example below.

Try
> > > it with http://127.0.0.1/cookieTest.asp?test=x and without the query

> > string
> > > variable.
> > >
> > > <%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> > > <% var exp = new Date();
> > > exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> > > var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
> > > exp.getUTCFullYear()
> > >
> > > var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> > > Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
> > > Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> > > %>
> > >
> > > Thanks
> > > _mark

> >
> >
> >



 
Reply With Quote
 
Mark
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-28-2005
Hi Mark...

Okay, now this is getting a little weird. After seeing your post, I went to
www.w3c.org and read sections of rfc2965 about cookies, and it does say in
there that the names of the cookies are case-insensitive, so the fact that
IIS behaves inconsistently could be argued as not a bug, but then the bug
just moves to IE, which is treating the cookie names as case-*sensitive*.

I.e. If I get the first reported problem to happen (the name of the cookie
switches case), from then on, IE will pass up *both* versions of the cookie
and the upper case one seems to trump the lower case one when you go to look
for it. In other words, you can never find that lower case cookie in ASP
even though IE is sending both back up.

Further muddying the waters is that your modification (referencing
Request.Cookies("TEST")) seems to undo whatever state in IIS gets the state
mixed up in the first place. If you're watching the headers returned from
the page with your modifications, the cookies in question *don't* switch case
on their names anymore. If you comment out those lines and just watch the
headers, IIS is messing with the case.

I made another small mod on your mod so that now it will set the cookie with
the querystring value, if any. Otherwise it sets it with the time of day.
Adding this on below. So in summary, it seems like IIS has a small bug that
MS might try to explain away as "acceptible inconsistency" and IE has a bug
in that it doesn't manage cookies of similar names properly.

<%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
<% var exp = new Date();
exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
exp.getUTCFullYear()

//Response.Write( "TEST cookie:" + Request.Cookies("TEST") + "<br>" );
//Response.Write( "test cookie:" + Request.Cookies("test") + "<br>" );

var x = Request.QueryString ("test");
if (String (x) == "undefined") x = (new Date()).toString();
Response.Cookies("TEST") = x;
Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
%>


Thanks
-mark


"Mark Schupp" wrote:

> possibly I am missing something (I'm not all that knowledgable about
> cookies) but the cookie collection does not appear to be case-sensitive.
>
> Running the below code gives the same value for "TEST" as for "test" on the
> second request (all cookies were deleted first).
>
> %@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> <% var exp = new Date();
> exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
> exp.getUTCFullYear()
>
> Response.Write( "TEST cookie:" + Request.Cookies("TEST") + "<br>" );
> Response.Write( "test cookie:" + Request.Cookies("test") + "<br>" );
>
> var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
> Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> %>
>
>
> --
> Mark Schupp
> Head of Development
> Integrity eLearning
> www.ielearning.com
>
>
> "Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Sorry... The point is to look at the cookie-setting that is done in the
> > response. Adding a lot of code to dump out the current cookie state I
> > thought would gum up the example.
> >
> > The main point is that given the code below, one would expect *always* to

> see
> >
> > Set-Cookie: TEST=This+is+a+test; expires=Wed, 28-Feb-2007 05:00:00 GMT;

> path=/
> >
> > as a header response for this page, since the name and case of the cookie

> is
> > a hard-coded literal value in the code. The bug in IIS is that if you

> have,
> > say, &test=x on your query string, IIS returns
> >
> > Set-Cookie: test=This+is+a+test; expires=Wed, 28-Feb-2007 05:00:00 GMT;

> path=/
> >
> > as the cookie setting (notice the case difference).
> >
> > This is a problem because when you look for Request.Cookies on subsequent
> > page views, those *are* case sensative, so the fact that you're not

> setting
> > the cookie you think you are can cause a lot of problems.
> >
> > The response header case-insensativity problem only seems to occur
> > a) when there a querystring variable exists with some other representation
> > of the name and
> > b) when the code uses Request.QueryString ("var") to get the Request

> object
> > to parse the query string. Note that you don't even have to be looking

> for
> > the variable (sort of) sharing the cookie name; anything to get Request to
> > parse the query string into a collection.
> >
> > If you leave &test=x off of the url or if you take out the
> > var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> > line, you get the first, correct cookie header as a response.
> >
> > Thanks
> > _mark
> >
> >
> > "Mark Schupp" wrote:
> >
> > > 2 problems.
> > >
> > > Your question does not make any sense to me.
> > > Your example page does not display anything.
> > >
> > > Please restate the problem as clearly as possible with examples of the

> what
> > > you expect to see that you are not seeing happen.
> > >
> > > If possible, provide a sample page that displays the difference.
> > >
> > > --
> > > Mark Schupp
> > > Head of Development
> > > Integrity eLearning
> > > www.ielearning.com
> > >
> > >
> > > "Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > > Hi...
> > > >
> > > > I've come across some weird bug with Response.Cookies. Or maybe it

> will
> > > be
> > > > called "by design" but for the life of me I can't figure out what

> purpose
> > > it
> > > > would serve. If you're setting a cookie (say Response.Cookies

> ("TEST"))
> > > and
> > > > you have a query string variable &test=x or &Test=x and you get
> > > > Request.QueryString to parse the query string, the cookie that gets
> > > dropped
> > > > matches the case of the query string, not what your code says. In

> other
> > > > words even though the code says Response.Cookies ("TEST"), it drops
> > > > Response.Cookies ("test") instead.
> > > >
> > > > Anyone have any idea what's going on here? There's an example below.

> Try
> > > > it with http://127.0.0.1/cookieTest.asp?test=x and without the query
> > > string
> > > > variable.
> > > >
> > > > <%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> > > > <% var exp = new Date();
> > > > exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> > > > var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
> > > > exp.getUTCFullYear()
> > > >
> > > > var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> > > > Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
> > > > Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> > > > %>
> > > >
> > > > Thanks
> > > > _mark
> > >
> > >
> > >

>
>
>

 
Reply With Quote
 
Mark Schupp
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-28-2005
Can you post a simple page that demonstrates the problem on the IE side?

--
Mark Schupp
Head of Development
Integrity eLearning
www.ielearning.com


"Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi Mark...
>
> Okay, now this is getting a little weird. After seeing your post, I went

to
> www.w3c.org and read sections of rfc2965 about cookies, and it does say in
> there that the names of the cookies are case-insensitive, so the fact that
> IIS behaves inconsistently could be argued as not a bug, but then the bug
> just moves to IE, which is treating the cookie names as case-*sensitive*.
>
> I.e. If I get the first reported problem to happen (the name of the cookie
> switches case), from then on, IE will pass up *both* versions of the

cookie
> and the upper case one seems to trump the lower case one when you go to

look
> for it. In other words, you can never find that lower case cookie in ASP
> even though IE is sending both back up.
>
> Further muddying the waters is that your modification (referencing
> Request.Cookies("TEST")) seems to undo whatever state in IIS gets the

state
> mixed up in the first place. If you're watching the headers returned from
> the page with your modifications, the cookies in question *don't* switch

case
> on their names anymore. If you comment out those lines and just watch the
> headers, IIS is messing with the case.
>
> I made another small mod on your mod so that now it will set the cookie

with
> the querystring value, if any. Otherwise it sets it with the time of day.
> Adding this on below. So in summary, it seems like IIS has a small bug

that
> MS might try to explain away as "acceptible inconsistency" and IE has a

bug
> in that it doesn't manage cookies of similar names properly.
>
> <%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> <% var exp = new Date();
> exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
> exp.getUTCFullYear()
>
> //Response.Write( "TEST cookie:" + Request.Cookies("TEST") + "<br>" );
> //Response.Write( "test cookie:" + Request.Cookies("test") + "<br>" );
>
> var x = Request.QueryString ("test");
> if (String (x) == "undefined") x = (new Date()).toString();
> Response.Cookies("TEST") = x;
> Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> %>
>
>
> Thanks
> -mark
>
>
> "Mark Schupp" wrote:
>
> > possibly I am missing something (I'm not all that knowledgable about
> > cookies) but the cookie collection does not appear to be case-sensitive.
> >
> > Running the below code gives the same value for "TEST" as for "test" on

the
> > second request (all cookies were deleted first).
> >
> > %@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> > <% var exp = new Date();
> > exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> > var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
> > exp.getUTCFullYear()
> >
> > Response.Write( "TEST cookie:" + Request.Cookies("TEST") + "<br>" );
> > Response.Write( "test cookie:" + Request.Cookies("test") + "<br>" );
> >
> > var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> > Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
> > Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> > %>
> >
> >
> > --
> > Mark Schupp
> > Head of Development
> > Integrity eLearning
> > www.ielearning.com
> >
> >
> > "Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > Sorry... The point is to look at the cookie-setting that is done in

the
> > > response. Adding a lot of code to dump out the current cookie state I
> > > thought would gum up the example.
> > >
> > > The main point is that given the code below, one would expect *always*

to
> > see
> > >
> > > Set-Cookie: TEST=This+is+a+test; expires=Wed, 28-Feb-2007 05:00:00

GMT;
> > path=/
> > >
> > > as a header response for this page, since the name and case of the

cookie
> > is
> > > a hard-coded literal value in the code. The bug in IIS is that if you

> > have,
> > > say, &test=x on your query string, IIS returns
> > >
> > > Set-Cookie: test=This+is+a+test; expires=Wed, 28-Feb-2007 05:00:00

GMT;
> > path=/
> > >
> > > as the cookie setting (notice the case difference).
> > >
> > > This is a problem because when you look for Request.Cookies on

subsequent
> > > page views, those *are* case sensative, so the fact that you're not

> > setting
> > > the cookie you think you are can cause a lot of problems.
> > >
> > > The response header case-insensativity problem only seems to occur
> > > a) when there a querystring variable exists with some other

representation
> > > of the name and
> > > b) when the code uses Request.QueryString ("var") to get the Request

> > object
> > > to parse the query string. Note that you don't even have to be

looking
> > for
> > > the variable (sort of) sharing the cookie name; anything to get

Request to
> > > parse the query string into a collection.
> > >
> > > If you leave &test=x off of the url or if you take out the
> > > var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> > > line, you get the first, correct cookie header as a response.
> > >
> > > Thanks
> > > _mark
> > >
> > >
> > > "Mark Schupp" wrote:
> > >
> > > > 2 problems.
> > > >
> > > > Your question does not make any sense to me.
> > > > Your example page does not display anything.
> > > >
> > > > Please restate the problem as clearly as possible with examples of

the
> > what
> > > > you expect to see that you are not seeing happen.
> > > >
> > > > If possible, provide a sample page that displays the difference.
> > > >
> > > > --
> > > > Mark Schupp
> > > > Head of Development
> > > > Integrity eLearning
> > > > www.ielearning.com
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > "Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > > > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > > > Hi...
> > > > >
> > > > > I've come across some weird bug with Response.Cookies. Or maybe

it
> > will
> > > > be
> > > > > called "by design" but for the life of me I can't figure out what

> > purpose
> > > > it
> > > > > would serve. If you're setting a cookie (say Response.Cookies

> > ("TEST"))
> > > > and
> > > > > you have a query string variable &test=x or &Test=x and you get
> > > > > Request.QueryString to parse the query string, the cookie that

gets
> > > > dropped
> > > > > matches the case of the query string, not what your code says. In

> > other
> > > > > words even though the code says Response.Cookies ("TEST"), it

drops
> > > > > Response.Cookies ("test") instead.
> > > > >
> > > > > Anyone have any idea what's going on here? There's an example

below.
> > Try
> > > > > it with http://127.0.0.1/cookieTest.asp?test=x and without the

query
> > > > string
> > > > > variable.
> > > > >
> > > > > <%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> > > > > <% var exp = new Date();
> > > > > exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> > > > > var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/"

+
> > > > > exp.getUTCFullYear()
> > > > >
> > > > > var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> > > > > Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
> > > > > Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> > > > > %>
> > > > >
> > > > > Thanks
> > > > > _mark
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >

> >
> >
> >



 
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Mark
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-28-2005
Hi Mark...

Generally, I've been using proxytrace to watch the headers going back and
forth, demonstrating the problem. Otherwise, you could look at the cookies
files on your IE side to see it.

If you set a cookie "TEST" and a cookie "test" for the same host/ie instance
pair, you'll see that on the IE side, it's treating them case-sensitively -
i.e. you get two different cookies with two different values. If you go back
to that host, IE will present both cookies to IIS. As your example
demonstrated, IIS is treating the names case-insensitively (upper trumps
lower).

The nub is that either cookie names are supposed to be case-insensitive or
they're not. IIS is being pretty loose about case-sensitivity but it could
be argued the standard lets them be. IE is being strictly case sensitive in
the management of the cookies, which interacts with IIS in strange ways.

I'm writing it up and submitting it to the MS bug-report line now
(unfortunately our msdn subscription is in the process of being renewed, or I
just would have called them up).

Thanks
-mark


"Mark Schupp" wrote:

> Can you post a simple page that demonstrates the problem on the IE side?
>
> --
> Mark Schupp
> Head of Development
> Integrity eLearning
> www.ielearning.com
>
>
> "Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Hi Mark...
> >
> > Okay, now this is getting a little weird. After seeing your post, I went

> to
> > www.w3c.org and read sections of rfc2965 about cookies, and it does say in
> > there that the names of the cookies are case-insensitive, so the fact that
> > IIS behaves inconsistently could be argued as not a bug, but then the bug
> > just moves to IE, which is treating the cookie names as case-*sensitive*.
> >
> > I.e. If I get the first reported problem to happen (the name of the cookie
> > switches case), from then on, IE will pass up *both* versions of the

> cookie
> > and the upper case one seems to trump the lower case one when you go to

> look
> > for it. In other words, you can never find that lower case cookie in ASP
> > even though IE is sending both back up.
> >
> > Further muddying the waters is that your modification (referencing
> > Request.Cookies("TEST")) seems to undo whatever state in IIS gets the

> state
> > mixed up in the first place. If you're watching the headers returned from
> > the page with your modifications, the cookies in question *don't* switch

> case
> > on their names anymore. If you comment out those lines and just watch the
> > headers, IIS is messing with the case.
> >
> > I made another small mod on your mod so that now it will set the cookie

> with
> > the querystring value, if any. Otherwise it sets it with the time of day.
> > Adding this on below. So in summary, it seems like IIS has a small bug

> that
> > MS might try to explain away as "acceptible inconsistency" and IE has a

> bug
> > in that it doesn't manage cookies of similar names properly.
> >
> > <%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> > <% var exp = new Date();
> > exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> > var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
> > exp.getUTCFullYear()
> >
> > //Response.Write( "TEST cookie:" + Request.Cookies("TEST") + "<br>" );
> > //Response.Write( "test cookie:" + Request.Cookies("test") + "<br>" );
> >
> > var x = Request.QueryString ("test");
> > if (String (x) == "undefined") x = (new Date()).toString();
> > Response.Cookies("TEST") = x;
> > Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> > %>
> >
> >
> > Thanks
> > -mark
> >
> >
> > "Mark Schupp" wrote:
> >
> > > possibly I am missing something (I'm not all that knowledgable about
> > > cookies) but the cookie collection does not appear to be case-sensitive.
> > >
> > > Running the below code gives the same value for "TEST" as for "test" on

> the
> > > second request (all cookies were deleted first).
> > >
> > > %@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> > > <% var exp = new Date();
> > > exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> > > var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/" +
> > > exp.getUTCFullYear()
> > >
> > > Response.Write( "TEST cookie:" + Request.Cookies("TEST") + "<br>" );
> > > Response.Write( "test cookie:" + Request.Cookies("test") + "<br>" );
> > >
> > > var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> > > Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
> > > Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> > > %>
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Mark Schupp
> > > Head of Development
> > > Integrity eLearning
> > > www.ielearning.com
> > >
> > >
> > > "Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > > Sorry... The point is to look at the cookie-setting that is done in

> the
> > > > response. Adding a lot of code to dump out the current cookie state I
> > > > thought would gum up the example.
> > > >
> > > > The main point is that given the code below, one would expect *always*

> to
> > > see
> > > >
> > > > Set-Cookie: TEST=This+is+a+test; expires=Wed, 28-Feb-2007 05:00:00

> GMT;
> > > path=/
> > > >
> > > > as a header response for this page, since the name and case of the

> cookie
> > > is
> > > > a hard-coded literal value in the code. The bug in IIS is that if you
> > > have,
> > > > say, &test=x on your query string, IIS returns
> > > >
> > > > Set-Cookie: test=This+is+a+test; expires=Wed, 28-Feb-2007 05:00:00

> GMT;
> > > path=/
> > > >
> > > > as the cookie setting (notice the case difference).
> > > >
> > > > This is a problem because when you look for Request.Cookies on

> subsequent
> > > > page views, those *are* case sensative, so the fact that you're not
> > > setting
> > > > the cookie you think you are can cause a lot of problems.
> > > >
> > > > The response header case-insensativity problem only seems to occur
> > > > a) when there a querystring variable exists with some other

> representation
> > > > of the name and
> > > > b) when the code uses Request.QueryString ("var") to get the Request
> > > object
> > > > to parse the query string. Note that you don't even have to be

> looking
> > > for
> > > > the variable (sort of) sharing the cookie name; anything to get

> Request to
> > > > parse the query string into a collection.
> > > >
> > > > If you leave &test=x off of the url or if you take out the
> > > > var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> > > > line, you get the first, correct cookie header as a response.
> > > >
> > > > Thanks
> > > > _mark
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > "Mark Schupp" wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > 2 problems.
> > > > >
> > > > > Your question does not make any sense to me.
> > > > > Your example page does not display anything.
> > > > >
> > > > > Please restate the problem as clearly as possible with examples of

> the
> > > what
> > > > > you expect to see that you are not seeing happen.
> > > > >
> > > > > If possible, provide a sample page that displays the difference.
> > > > >
> > > > > --
> > > > > Mark Schupp
> > > > > Head of Development
> > > > > Integrity eLearning
> > > > > www.ielearning.com
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > "Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > > > > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > > > > Hi...
> > > > > >
> > > > > > I've come across some weird bug with Response.Cookies. Or maybe

> it
> > > will
> > > > > be
> > > > > > called "by design" but for the life of me I can't figure out what
> > > purpose
> > > > > it
> > > > > > would serve. If you're setting a cookie (say Response.Cookies
> > > ("TEST"))
> > > > > and
> > > > > > you have a query string variable &test=x or &Test=x and you get
> > > > > > Request.QueryString to parse the query string, the cookie that

> gets
> > > > > dropped
> > > > > > matches the case of the query string, not what your code says. In
> > > other
> > > > > > words even though the code says Response.Cookies ("TEST"), it

> drops
> > > > > > Response.Cookies ("test") instead.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Anyone have any idea what's going on here? There's an example

> below.
> > > Try
> > > > > > it with http://127.0.0.1/cookieTest.asp?test=x and without the

> query
> > > > > string
> > > > > > variable.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > <%@Language=Jscript Enablesessionstate=false%>
> > > > > > <% var exp = new Date();
> > > > > > exp.setTime(exp.getTime() + (2 * 365 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000))
> > > > > > var expDate = (exp.getUTCMonth()+1) + "/" + exp.getUTCDate() + "/"

> +
> > > > > > exp.getUTCFullYear()
> > > > > >
> > > > > > var x = Request.QueryString ("dummy");
> > > > > > Response.Cookies("TEST") = "This is a test";
> > > > > > Response.Cookies("TEST").Expires = expDate;
> > > > > > %>
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Thanks
> > > > > > _mark
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > >
> > >
> > >

>
>
>

 
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