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Need to learn J2EE and friends

 
 
Arne Vajhøj
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      09-06-2011
On 9/6/2011 12:05 PM, nroberts wrote:
> On Sep 5, 6:48 pm, Lew<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> nroberts wrote:

>
>>> Where would be a good place to start?

>>
>> When you say "J2EE" and "EJB", do you have any information on what versions of those you're working with? Also, what specific implementation are you using (WebLogic, JBoss, Glassfish, ...)? Or are you tasked with picking an implementation?
>>

>
> Looks like the current version is JBoss 4.0 - looks to me like this is
> J2EE 1.4? I may have the ability to change this in the future but
> this is what the current view is.


JBoss 4.0 is J2EE 1.4.

So you will need to live with that until you can upgrade.


>> Download and install Glassfish - it's lightweight enough to run on any decent developer workstation (dual-core or better, 2 GB RAM or better, couple of hundred megs of disk or better).http://glassfish.java.net/

>
> Got it installed both from the EE Jdk and with Eclipse as some sort of
> package eclipse thing (eclipse wasn't able to restart the glassfish
> domain when it wasn't the integrated version).


Given that JBoss is free, then it makes more sense to use that when you
know that is the final destination.

Arne


 
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Arved Sandstrom
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      09-07-2011
On 11-09-06 08:01 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
> On 9/6/2011 5:20 AM, Arved Sandstrom wrote:
>> 1. As you begin teasing apart what a J2EE/Java EE application does, do
>> keep in mind that at their core these API families are 95 percent about
>> writing web apps. Plain and simple. Whether it's the Struts framework
>> building upon the Servlet API in the web tier, or session beans in the
>> services layer that encapsulate your business logic and provide
>> scalability and lifecycle management, it's all about scalable and
>> distributed servicing of requests.

>
>> 6. "Enterprise" in "J2EE" or "Java EE" or "Enterprise Java" means "web".
>> Official documentation may not put it quite so baldly, but it's
>> basically all about handling HTTP/HTTPS requests from web browsers, or
>> SOAP requests coming in over HTTP/HTTPS for a Java web service.
>>
>> The other main non-negligible input mechanism is messaging (JMS, or Java
>> Message Service).
>>
>> There are obviously some other aspects to "enterprise", like being able
>> to talk to other systems like an EIS (you'll see the Connector
>> architecture discussed in the tutorial). But fundamentally it's about
>> being a web app.

>
> I would say that about 50% of Java EE is by nature web oriented, but
>>80% of Java EE apps have a web interface (I am not counting desktop

> apps using SOAP/HTTP as being web here - if we do it would be >95%).


I won't disagree with your breakdown: what I really meant was what you
just said, that the large majority of Java EE apps have a web (browser)
interface. And furthermore that this web (browser) interface is the
_primary_ and often only interface.

[ SNIP ]

AHS
 
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markspace
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      09-07-2011
On 9/6/2011 4:06 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:

>> I do have "Core J2EE Patterns, 2nd Ed." and "Core JavaServer Faces"
>> from the business's bookshelf.

>
> Core J2EE Patterns is old.
>
> Core JSF is good if you will be using JSF - otherwise it is
> irrelevant (and there are a ton of Java web framework out
> there).



Actually, Core JavaServer Faces is in its third edition. I've got the
3rd ed. sitting right here next to me on the desk. So unless by CJSF he
means a later edition, then that too is quite old.

But as you say irrelevant unless the app is using JSF.

 
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Arne Vajhøj
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      09-07-2011
On 9/6/2011 8:30 PM, markspace wrote:
> On 9/6/2011 4:06 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
>>> I do have "Core J2EE Patterns, 2nd Ed." and "Core JavaServer Faces"
>>> from the business's bookshelf.

>>
>> Core J2EE Patterns is old.
>>
>> Core JSF is good if you will be using JSF - otherwise it is
>> irrelevant (and there are a ton of Java web framework out
>> there).

>
>
> Actually, Core JavaServer Faces is in its third edition. I've got the
> 3rd ed. sitting right here next to me on the desk. So unless by CJSF he
> means a later edition, then that too is quite old.


If it is JSF 2.x then 3rd edition is necessary.

But for 1.x I would say that both 1st and 2nd edition would
be useful. JSF 1.2 introduced a lot of useful stuff, but
the concepts did not change much.

> But as you say irrelevant unless the app is using JSF.


If it is old stuff then a Struts book may be needed.

Arne


 
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