Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Programming > Java > which JDK to use?

Reply
Thread Tools

which JDK to use?

 
 
steveh44
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-04-2011
I'd like to learn Java. Should I be using the openJDK or the JDK from
oracle? not sure what is the difference. Which is the real Java?

thank you
/steve
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Arne Vajhøj
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-04-2011
On 9/4/2011 10:17 AM, steveh44 wrote:
> I'd like to learn Java. Should I be using the openJDK or the JDK from
> oracle? not sure what is the difference. Which is the real Java?


Java is really a specification with multiple implementations.

You pick the implementation you prefer.

If you are using Windows, then I would go for the Oracle
one - it is still the most common to use (remember to
check the license text).

If you are using Linux then go for what is in your
repository (which will most likely my OpenJDK based).

Arne

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Lew
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-04-2011
Arne Vajhøj wrote:
> steveh44 wrote:
>> I'd like to learn Java. Should I be using the openJDK [sic] or the JDK from
>> oracle [sic]? not sure what is the difference. Which is the real Java?


Both.

Also, Oracle is a contributor, perhaps the single largest contributor to the OpenJDK code.

I'm pretty sure, without checking just this moment to be really sure, that there's a fair amount OpenJDK code in the Oracle release.

> Java is really a specification with multiple implementations.
>
> You pick the implementation you prefer.
>
> If you are using Windows, then I would go for the Oracle
> one - it is still the most common to use (remember to
> check the license text).
>
> If you are using Linux then go for what is in your
> repository (which will most likely my OpenJDK based).


Any Java implementation that passes the compatibility suite is the real deal.

--
Lew

 
Reply With Quote
 
Roedy Green
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-05-2011
On Sun, 4 Sep 2011 07:17:32 -0700 (PDT), steveh44
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who
said :

>I'd like to learn Java. Should I be using the openJDK or the JDK from
>oracle? not sure what is the difference. Which is the real Java?


Nearly everyone uses Oracle. That is the one newbies should use.

see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/gettingstarted.html
http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jdk.html
--
Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
http://mindprod.com
The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is,
the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness.
~ John Kenneth Galbraith (born: 1908-10-15 died: 2006-04-29 at age: 97)
 
Reply With Quote
 
Lew
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-05-2011
Roedy Green wrote:
> steveh44 wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :
>> I'd like to learn Java. Should I be using the openJDK or the JDK from
>> oracle? not sure what is the difference. Which is the real Java?

>
> Nearly everyone uses Oracle. That is the one newbies should use.


As Qu0ll and I pointed out, this is pretty much equivalent to using OpenJDK.. Most Linuces use OpenJDK, as Arne pointed out. There's really no difference. I've also used IBM's JDK 6 without any pain.

To Qu0ll's point that Oracle's JDK 7 is OpenJDK, that's 99% true. There are pieces you can purchase that supplement the open-source part, such as thesoft real-time version, that are not in OpenJDK. I was unable to confirm that the current Oracle release is precisely the same as OpenJDK, but it's clear that the differences, if any, are in the corners.

Anyway, for the OP's purpose just use either one.

--
Lew
 
Reply With Quote
 
Arne Vajhøj
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-05-2011
On 9/4/2011 3:10 PM, Lew wrote:
> Arne Vajhøj wrote:
>> steveh44 wrote:
>>> I'd like to learn Java. Should I be using the openJDK [sic] or the JDK from
>>> oracle [sic]? not sure what is the difference. Which is the real Java?

>
> Both.
>
> Also, Oracle is a contributor, perhaps the single largest contributor to the OpenJDK code.


It is probably >95% of th total code that is from SUN/Oracle.

> I'm pretty sure, without checking just this moment to be really sure, that there's a fair amount OpenJDK code in the Oracle release.


SUN Java and OpnJDK has always shared almost all cod. And Oracle has
announced that they want to make OpenJDK the RI. So it seems fair to
assume that for 7 the code is flowing OpenJDK->Oracle Java.

>> Java is really a specification with multiple implementations.
>>
>> You pick the implementation you prefer.
>>
>> If you are using Windows, then I would go for the Oracle
>> one - it is still the most common to use (remember to
>> check the license text).
>>
>> If you are using Linux then go for what is in your
>> repository (which will most likely my OpenJDK based).

>
> Any Java implementation that passes the compatibility suite is the real deal.


Passing the Java TCK is sufficient to make it true Java.

But some Java's may still be better than others. More users =>
easier to get help with installation, better performance, faster
bug fixing etc..

Arne


 
Reply With Quote
 
Roedy Green
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-05-2011
On Mon, 5 Sep 2011 13:16:16 -0700 (PDT), Lew <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :

>
>Anyway, for the OP's purpose just use either one.


many problems have to do with installations, set parms etc. A newbie
will sidestep many complications if he sticks to Oracle to start.

You are giving advice that would be suitable for someone like
yourself, not a newbie.
--
Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
http://mindprod.com
The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is,
the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness.
~ John Kenneth Galbraith (born: 1908-10-15 died: 2006-04-29 at age: 97)
 
Reply With Quote
 
Jeff Higgins
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-06-2011
On 09/05/2011 06:56 PM, Roedy Green wrote:
> On Mon, 5 Sep 2011 13:16:16 -0700 (PDT), Lew<(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :
>
>>
>> Anyway, for the OP's purpose just use either one.

>
> many problems have to do with installations, set parms etc. A newbie
> will sidestep many complications if he sticks to Oracle to start.
>
> You are giving advice that would be suitable for someone like
> yourself, not a newbie.

On this Debian distro installing the Debian packaged JDK is less
complicated than installing the Oracle packaged JDK.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Lew
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-06-2011
On Monday, September 5, 2011 5:15:18 PM UTC-7, Jeff Higgins wrote:
> On 09/05/2011 06:56 PM, Roedy Green wrote:
> > On Mon, 5 Sep 2011 13:16:16 -0700 (PDT), Lew<(E-Mail Removed)>
> > wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :
> >
> >>
> >> Anyway, for the OP's purpose just use either one.

> >
> > many problems have to do with installations, set parms etc. A newbie
> > will sidestep many complications if he sticks to Oracle to start.
> >
> > You are giving advice that would be suitable for someone like
> > yourself, not a newbie.


On the contrary, I'm giving advice that is better for the newbie than yours..

If the newbie is using Linux, on which OpenJDK will have already been installed. Isn't zero installation effort better than little installation effort?

And on Linux distros, installing OpenJDK is actually easier than installingOracle's. Oracle's requires unpacking and moving a directory, then manually moving around symbolic links and the JAVA_HOME environment variable. Yum and apt installations of OpenJDK do all that for you. Your advice is better for someone like you than for a newbie. In fact, your advice is simplyterrible for a newbie.

Check your facts.

> On this Debian distro installing the Debian packaged JDK is less
> complicated than installing the Oracle packaged JDK.


By many meters.

--
Lew

 
Reply With Quote
 
Nasser M. Abbasi
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-06-2011
On 9/5/2011 1:16 PM, Lew wrote:
>
> To Qu0ll's point that Oracle's JDK 7 is OpenJDK, that's 99% true.
> There are pieces you can purchase that supplement the open-source part,
> such as the soft real-time version, that are not in OpenJDK. I was unable to
> confirm that the current Oracle release is precisely the same as OpenJDK,
> but it's clear that the differences, if any, are in the corners.
>


on related point:

http://lxnews.org/2011/09/05/oracle-...shipping-java/

"September 5, 2011"
"Oracle has decided to stop shipping its proprietary Java packages
for Linux, telling everyone to move to OpenJDK instead."

" Oracle has retired the “Operating System Distributor License for Java” (DLJ)
that was created by Sun in 2006"

"the need for Oracle’s Java implementation has steadily decreased since
the release of the OpenJDK 6, adding that the OpenJDK is proven and mature
and is the chosen package of most Linux distributors."

--Nasser
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
JDK 1.5 or JDK 1.6 Pep Java 19 07-15-2007 12:06 AM
regarding JDk 141 and JDK 122 for linux 64 bit Platform Jaggu Java 3 01-08-2007 10:47 AM
What is the difference between J2EE, JDK, JDK-SDK, JRE and J2SE packages ? Ulf Meinhardt Java 0 08-10-2006 07:12 PM
jEdit: compiles JDK 1.5.0 ok, but runs JDK 1.4.1 (why?) Thomas G. Marshall Java 5 08-06-2004 04:12 AM
Help with converting IDS from JDK 1.1 to JDK 1.4 Babar Java 1 05-20-2004 09:11 PM



Advertisments