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Camera fails. What happened?

 
 
Charles Packer
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      08-15-2011
Curious as to what might have happened to an Olympus
SP-350 that served me well for four years and then
failed, more or less suddenly. Its programming is
somehow scrambled: the shutter is inoperative, the menu
can't be called up, the various other buttons are dead.
However, the zoom lens moves when the camera is turned on
(but doesn't respond to the manual control) and the screen
shows what the lens is seeing. The pictures in the memory can
be uploaded to my computer -- but can't be erased.
When it failed it was being used by one of the
beloved members of my household whose memory of the
exact circumstances of its failure was wanting of
detail and possibly accuracy.

--
Charles Packer
http://cpacker.org/whatnews
mailboxATcpacker.org
 
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Martin Brown
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      08-15-2011
On 15/08/2011 13:27, Charles Packer wrote:
> Curious as to what might have happened to an Olympus
> SP-350 that served me well for four years and then
> failed, more or less suddenly. Its programming is
> somehow scrambled: the shutter is inoperative, the menu
> can't be called up, the various other buttons are dead.


Might be worth looking to see if a firmrware upgrade is available for
download. It is already dead now so you have nothing much to lose!

Reprogramming if successful may recover the lost functionality or render
the thing completely inoperable so rescue any pictures first!

> However, the zoom lens moves when the camera is turned on
> (but doesn't respond to the manual control) and the screen
> shows what the lens is seeing. The pictures in the memory can
> be uploaded to my computer -- but can't be erased.
> When it failed it was being used by one of the
> beloved members of my household whose memory of the
> exact circumstances of its failure was wanting of
> detail and possibly accuracy.


Possibly they did nothing and it spontaneously suffered bit rot in the
flash memory that stores the firmware that only affects the functioning
of certain features of the camera. Execute the bad code and it dies.

Good luck. Never seen a fault quite like you describe.

Regards,
Martin Brown

 
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tony cooper
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      08-15-2011
On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 09:33:03 -0400, Alan Browne
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On 2011-08-15 08:27 , Charles Packer wrote:
>> Curious as to what might have happened to an Olympus
>> SP-350 that served me well for four years and then
>> failed, more or less suddenly.

>
>
>The classic first step (or second if you can at least recover the
>photos) is:
>
>1. Turn off. Remove batteries. Let sit for 24 hours.
>
>Then
>
>2. While off: Depress all buttons, move all switches (several times
>each). Feel/look for 'sticky' buttons or switches. Also clean the unit
>at this time. You never know. If anything can be moved, move it
>several times. If the lens is removable: clean the contacts with a
>pencil eraser (make sure you remove the residue after).
>
>3. If it has a memory card, remove it and (after copying the photos off
>of it) re-format it using your computer. (You'll probably need to
>re-re-format in-camera, but that's a few steps away).
>
>4. 24 hours later, insert the batteries and see what happens.
>
>5. In the possible case of success, re-format the card (that you've
>already copied the images from).


A friend of mine asked me about recommendations for a camera because
his was broken. During the conversation he brought out his broken
camera, and I noticed that the shutter release button was cocked.

Evidently, some foreign object had worked it's way into the mechanism.
A little jiggling and the button returned to normal. The camera has
worked fine since.

The friend is a bit disappointed. He was looking forward to buying a
new camera with more features and the broken camera gave him an excuse
to do so. Now he can't convince his wife that the expense is
justified.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 
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Mike
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-15-2011
On 15/08/2011 9:33 AM, Alan Browne wrote:
> On 2011-08-15 08:27 , Charles Packer wrote:
>> Curious as to what might have happened to an Olympus
>> SP-350 that served me well for four years and then
>> failed, more or less suddenly.

>
>
> The classic first step (or second if you can at least recover the
> photos) is:
>
> 1. Turn off. Remove batteries. Let sit for 24 hours.
>
> Then
>
> 2. While off: Depress all buttons, move all switches (several times
> each). Feel/look for 'sticky' buttons or switches. Also clean the unit
> at this time. You never know. If anything can be moved, move it several
> times. If the lens is removable: clean the contacts with a pencil eraser
> (make sure you remove the residue after).
>
> 3. If it has a memory card, remove it and (after copying the photos off
> of it) re-format it using your computer. (You'll probably need to
> re-re-format in-camera, but that's a few steps away).
>
> 4. 24 hours later, insert the batteries and see what happens.
>
> 5. In the possible case of success, re-format the card (that you've
> already copied the images from).
>
> Best of luck.
>
>

Good advice, then try reflashing the firmware.

http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_se...p?id=1188&os=w


 
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ray
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      08-15-2011
On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 10:52:36 -0400, tony cooper wrote:

> On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 09:33:03 -0400, Alan Browne
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>On 2011-08-15 08:27 , Charles Packer wrote:
>>> Curious as to what might have happened to an Olympus SP-350 that
>>> served me well for four years and then failed, more or less suddenly.

>>
>>
>>The classic first step (or second if you can at least recover the
>>photos) is:
>>
>>1. Turn off. Remove batteries. Let sit for 24 hours.
>>
>>Then
>>
>>2. While off: Depress all buttons, move all switches (several times
>>each). Feel/look for 'sticky' buttons or switches. Also clean the unit
>>at this time. You never know. If anything can be moved, move it
>>several times. If the lens is removable: clean the contacts with a
>>pencil eraser (make sure you remove the residue after).
>>
>>3. If it has a memory card, remove it and (after copying the photos off
>>of it) re-format it using your computer. (You'll probably need to
>>re-re-format in-camera, but that's a few steps away).
>>
>>4. 24 hours later, insert the batteries and see what happens.
>>
>>5. In the possible case of success, re-format the card (that you've
>>already copied the images from).

>
> A friend of mine asked me about recommendations for a camera because his
> was broken. During the conversation he brought out his broken camera,
> and I noticed that the shutter release button was cocked.
>
> Evidently, some foreign object had worked it's way into the mechanism. A
> little jiggling and the button returned to normal. The camera has
> worked fine since.
>
> The friend is a bit disappointed. He was looking forward to buying a
> new camera with more features and the broken camera gave him an excuse
> to do so. Now he can't convince his wife that the expense is justified.


So why did he tell her it was fixed?
 
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Mort
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-15-2011
Alan Browne wrote:
> On 2011-08-15 08:27 , Charles Packer wrote:
>> Curious as to what might have happened to an Olympus
>> SP-350 that served me well for four years and then
>> failed, more or less suddenly.

>
>
> The classic first step (or second if you can at least recover the
> photos) is:
>
> 1. Turn off. Remove batteries. Let sit for 24 hours.
>
> Then
>
> 2. While off: Depress all buttons, move all switches (several times
> each). Feel/look for 'sticky' buttons or switches. Also clean the unit
> at this time. You never know. If anything can be moved, move it several
> times. If the lens is removable: clean the contacts with a pencil eraser
> (make sure you remove the residue after).
>
> 3. If it has a memory card, remove it and (after copying the photos off
> of it) re-format it using your computer. (You'll probably need to
> re-re-format in-camera, but that's a few steps away).
>
> 4. 24 hours later, insert the batteries and see what happens.
>
> 5. In the possible case of success, re-format the card (that you've
> already copied the images from).
>
> Best of luck.
>
>

Hi,

I would add one more thing. Try another (good) battery. Low voltage in a
dying battery can wreak havoc with the camera's functions. Good luck.

Mort Linder
 
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PeterN
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      08-15-2011
On 8/15/2011 10:52 AM, tony cooper wrote:
> On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 09:33:03 -0400, Alan Browne
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> On 2011-08-15 08:27 , Charles Packer wrote:
>>> Curious as to what might have happened to an Olympus
>>> SP-350 that served me well for four years and then
>>> failed, more or less suddenly.

>>
>>
>> The classic first step (or second if you can at least recover the
>> photos) is:
>>
>> 1. Turn off. Remove batteries. Let sit for 24 hours.
>>
>> Then
>>
>> 2. While off: Depress all buttons, move all switches (several times
>> each). Feel/look for 'sticky' buttons or switches. Also clean the unit
>> at this time. You never know. If anything can be moved, move it
>> several times. If the lens is removable: clean the contacts with a
>> pencil eraser (make sure you remove the residue after).
>>
>> 3. If it has a memory card, remove it and (after copying the photos off
>> of it) re-format it using your computer. (You'll probably need to
>> re-re-format in-camera, but that's a few steps away).
>>
>> 4. 24 hours later, insert the batteries and see what happens.
>>
>> 5. In the possible case of success, re-format the card (that you've
>> already copied the images from).

>
> A friend of mine asked me about recommendations for a camera because
> his was broken. During the conversation he brought out his broken
> camera, and I noticed that the shutter release button was cocked.
>
> Evidently, some foreign object had worked it's way into the mechanism.
> A little jiggling and the button returned to normal. The camera has
> worked fine since.
>
> The friend is a bit disappointed. He was looking forward to buying a
> new camera with more features and the broken camera gave him an excuse
> to do so. Now he can't convince his wife that the expense is
> justified.
>
>

How hard did he work to get the grain of sand in the mechanism.
then he can always drop it, or test how well it works underwater. <evil
grin>

--
Peter
 
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Robert Coe
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-16-2011
On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 05:27:00 -0700 (PDT), Charles Packer <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
: Curious as to what might have happened to an Olympus
: SP-350 that served me well for four years and then
: failed, more or less suddenly. Its programming is
: somehow scrambled: the shutter is inoperative, the menu
: can't be called up, the various other buttons are dead.
: However, the zoom lens moves when the camera is turned on
: (but doesn't respond to the manual control) and the screen
: shows what the lens is seeing. The pictures in the memory can
: be uploaded to my computer -- but can't be erased.
: When it failed it was being used by one of the
: beloved members of my household whose memory of the
: exact circumstances of its failure was wanting of
: detail and possibly accuracy.

Some diode overheats and goes pffft, and ... "there is no later".

Bob (who gives extra credit for identifying the quote)
 
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Robert Coe
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-16-2011
On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 10:52:36 -0400, tony cooper <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
: On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 09:33:03 -0400, Alan Browne
: <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
:
: >On 2011-08-15 08:27 , Charles Packer wrote:
: >> Curious as to what might have happened to an Olympus
: >> SP-350 that served me well for four years and then
: >> failed, more or less suddenly.
: >
: >
: >The classic first step (or second if you can at least recover the
: >photos) is:
: >
: >1. Turn off. Remove batteries. Let sit for 24 hours.
: >
: >Then
: >
: >2. While off: Depress all buttons, move all switches (several times
: >each). Feel/look for 'sticky' buttons or switches. Also clean the unit
: >at this time. You never know. If anything can be moved, move it
: >several times. If the lens is removable: clean the contacts with a
: >pencil eraser (make sure you remove the residue after).
: >
: >3. If it has a memory card, remove it and (after copying the photos off
: >of it) re-format it using your computer. (You'll probably need to
: >re-re-format in-camera, but that's a few steps away).
: >
: >4. 24 hours later, insert the batteries and see what happens.
: >
: >5. In the possible case of success, re-format the card (that you've
: >already copied the images from).
:
: A friend of mine asked me about recommendations for a camera because
: his was broken. During the conversation he brought out his broken
: camera, and I noticed that the shutter release button was cocked.
:
: Evidently, some foreign object had worked it's way into the mechanism.
: A little jiggling and the button returned to normal. The camera has
: worked fine since.
:
: The friend is a bit disappointed. He was looking forward to buying a
: new camera with more features and the broken camera gave him an excuse
: to do so. Now he can't convince his wife that the expense is
: justified.

You're joking, right? The answer is obvious: he gives his old camera to his
wife! Unless his wife is already an experienced photographer, in which case
she'll understand the need for a new camera and the question won't arise.
(Alternatively, he buys his wife a new one too.)

Bob (whose wife understands)
 
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PeterN
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      08-16-2011
On 8/15/2011 10:46 PM, Robert Coe wrote:
> On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 10:52:36 -0400, tony cooper<(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
> : On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 09:33:03 -0400, Alan Browne
> :<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> :
> :>On 2011-08-15 08:27 , Charles Packer wrote:
> :>> Curious as to what might have happened to an Olympus
> :>> SP-350 that served me well for four years and then
> :>> failed, more or less suddenly.
> :>
> :>
> :>The classic first step (or second if you can at least recover the
> :>photos) is:
> :>
> :>1. Turn off. Remove batteries. Let sit for 24 hours.
> :>
> :>Then
> :>
> :>2. While off: Depress all buttons, move all switches (several times
> :>each). Feel/look for 'sticky' buttons or switches. Also clean the unit
> :>at this time. You never know. If anything can be moved, move it
> :>several times. If the lens is removable: clean the contacts with a
> :>pencil eraser (make sure you remove the residue after).
> :>
> :>3. If it has a memory card, remove it and (after copying the photos off
> :>of it) re-format it using your computer. (You'll probably need to
> :>re-re-format in-camera, but that's a few steps away).
> :>
> :>4. 24 hours later, insert the batteries and see what happens.
> :>
> :>5. In the possible case of success, re-format the card (that you've
> :>already copied the images from).
> :
> : A friend of mine asked me about recommendations for a camera because
> : his was broken. During the conversation he brought out his broken
> : camera, and I noticed that the shutter release button was cocked.
> :
> : Evidently, some foreign object had worked it's way into the mechanism.
> : A little jiggling and the button returned to normal. The camera has
> : worked fine since.
> :
> : The friend is a bit disappointed. He was looking forward to buying a
> : new camera with more features and the broken camera gave him an excuse
> : to do so. Now he can't convince his wife that the expense is
> : justified.
>
> You're joking, right? The answer is obvious: he gives his old camera to his
> wife! Unless his wife is already an experienced photographer, in which case
> she'll understand the need for a new camera and the question won't arise.
> (Alternatively, he buys his wife a new one too.)
>
> Bob (whose wife understands)


I have a friend whose wife encourages him to get new equipment. She
insists that her new jewelry has nothing to do with it.

--
Peter
 
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