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James D Andrews
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-14-2011
This is not a real **** me off, kind of thing - more of just an
irritant, but I wonder if some of you other guys get this and how you
deal with it when it happens.

In my case, I'm the go-to guy for several family members' computers
(which is why I'm here asking questions so much).

When they have a problem, they come to me. I fix the problem. It
often involves some kind of malware, but other software issues as well.
I tell them how to avoid the problem in the future, usually by
installing something in particular, e.g. Avast, Malwarebytes, etc. if
they're having problems with their already installed stuff. (Really,
who uses Panda?) And I give them a link.

Frequently, they ignore this advice and/or look elsewhere. Life
revolves around Google, it seems, and so many people buy Norton simply
because it was pre-installed on their computers or such.

Needless to say, a few weeks or months later, I'll get the "something's
wrong with my computer" call, and the issue is directly related to
their not doing what I told them to do.

Does this happen to you other guys much, and if so, does it feel like
fingernails on the chalkboard to you?

--
-There are some who call me...
Jim


"Facts are the enemy of truth."
- Don Quixote - "Man of La Mancha"


 
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Paul
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-14-2011
James D Andrews wrote:
> This is not a real **** me off, kind of thing - more of just an
> irritant, but I wonder if some of you other guys get this and how you
> deal with it when it happens.
>
> In my case, I'm the go-to guy for several family members' computers
> (which is why I'm here asking questions so much).
>
> When they have a problem, they come to me. I fix the problem. It often
> involves some kind of malware, but other software issues as well. I tell
> them how to avoid the problem in the future, usually by installing
> something in particular, e.g. Avast, Malwarebytes, etc. if they're
> having problems with their already installed stuff. (Really, who uses
> Panda?) And I give them a link.
>
> Frequently, they ignore this advice and/or look elsewhere. Life
> revolves around Google, it seems, and so many people buy Norton simply
> because it was pre-installed on their computers or such.
>
> Needless to say, a few weeks or months later, I'll get the "something's
> wrong with my computer" call, and the issue is directly related to their
> not doing what I told them to do.
>
> Does this happen to you other guys much, and if so, does it feel like
> fingernails on the chalkboard to you?
>


Well, what goes around, comes around.

If I say to my brother the mechanic, "my car is making
this funny noise", he'll say "Isn't that the same noise
it was making the last time you visited me ?".

And if I go to my brother-in-law the doctor and
say "it hurts when I do this", he'll say "well,
if it hurts, then don't do that".

So the "shoe can be on the other foot".

*******

You can't expect people with varying levels of
computer phobia, to exercise perfectly linear
or rational thinking. Many of their responses
will be an impulse, such as "well, I visited these
20 Google pages, and none of the answers make
sense, so in revenge, I'm going to run this
registry polisher and see what happens". Or the
"maybe if I delete files like a madman, something
good will happen". I always enjoy that approach.

If the next time you visit, the computer is
almost unrecognizable due to "user input", that's
to be expected.

It is possible for computers to be designed like
appliances. For example, there was a machine set up
as a "more or less electric typewriter", but being
limited to a single function, the thrill wears off
pretty rapidly. Having machines which are not tied
down, certainly means they have the potential to do
more, but with the side effect that they're easier
to break.

You could always install SteadyState, but that would be
a mean thing to do. I can imagine the look on a
relative's face, if you turned their machine into
a machine like they offer at the public library
The public library computer - reboots between users,
and won't save anything to the hard drive

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SteadyState

"Discard mode: The cache is cleared upon every reboot,
thus returning the system to its previous state."

Paul
 
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James D Andrews
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-14-2011
Paul was thinking very hard and all he could come up with was:
> James D Andrews wrote:
>> This is not a real **** me off, kind of thing - more of just an irritant,
>> but I wonder if some of you other guys get this and how you deal with it
>> when it happens.
>>
>> In my case, I'm the go-to guy for several family members' computers (which
>> is why I'm here asking questions so much).
>>
>> When they have a problem, they come to me. I fix the problem. It often
>> involves some kind of malware, but other software issues as well. I tell
>> them how to avoid the problem in the future, usually by installing
>> something in particular, e.g. Avast, Malwarebytes, etc. if they're having
>> problems with their already installed stuff. (Really, who uses Panda?)
>> And I give them a link.
>>
>> Frequently, they ignore this advice and/or look elsewhere. Life revolves
>> around Google, it seems, and so many people buy Norton simply because it
>> was pre-installed on their computers or such.
>>
>> Needless to say, a few weeks or months later, I'll get the "something's
>> wrong with my computer" call, and the issue is directly related to their
>> not doing what I told them to do.
>>
>> Does this happen to you other guys much, and if so, does it feel like
>> fingernails on the chalkboard to you?
>>

>
> SNIP


> You can't expect people with varying levels of
> computer phobia, to exercise perfectly linear
> or rational thinking. Many of their responses
> will be an impulse, such as "well, I visited these
> 20 Google pages, and none of the answers make
> sense, so in revenge, I'm going to run this
> registry polisher and see what happens". Or the
> "maybe if I delete files like a madman, something
> good will happen". I always enjoy that approach.


Ah, the Scan your PC Now! always gets me, along with the You're
Infected scareware.

I had one relative take a bite on scareware once and bought the alleged
software. She ended up finding some $500 missing from her account.
She was convinced it had something to do with a Newegg purchase of some
part I had her order. I explained. Next time I talked to her, she was
still convinced it was Newegg.

> If the next time you visit, the computer is
> almost unrecognizable due to "user input", that's
> to be expected.


Yeah. You're right, of course. Just kind of think "if you did what I
told you..."


> You could always install SteadyState, but that would be
> a mean thing to do. I can imagine the look on a
> relative's face, if you turned their machine into
> a machine like they offer at the public library
> The public library computer - reboots between users,
> and won't save anything to the hard drive
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SteadyState
>
> "Discard mode: The cache is cleared upon every reboot,
> thus returning the system to its previous state."
>
> Paul



That would be so cruel.

--
-There are some who call me...
Jim


"Facts are the enemy of truth."
- Don Quixote - "Man of La Mancha"


 
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Ken
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-14-2011
James D Andrews wrote:
> This is not a real **** me off, kind of thing - more of just an
> irritant, but I wonder if some of you other guys get this and how you
> deal with it when it happens.
>
> In my case, I'm the go-to guy for several family members' computers
> (which is why I'm here asking questions so much).
>
> When they have a problem, they come to me. I fix the problem. It often
> involves some kind of malware, but other software issues as well. I tell
> them how to avoid the problem in the future, usually by installing
> something in particular, e.g. Avast, Malwarebytes, etc. if they're
> having problems with their already installed stuff. (Really, who uses
> Panda?) And I give them a link.
>
> Frequently, they ignore this advice and/or look elsewhere. Life revolves
> around Google, it seems, and so many people buy Norton simply because it
> was pre-installed on their computers or such.
>
> Needless to say, a few weeks or months later, I'll get the "something's
> wrong with my computer" call, and the issue is directly related to their
> not doing what I told them to do.
>
> Does this happen to you other guys much, and if so, does it feel like
> fingernails on the chalkboard to you?
>


One of the realities of life is you cannot help someone who does NOT
want to be helped. It is painful to watch sometimes, but after having
tried to help someone several times and ignored, it is time to go get a
beer and forget about it.

I had a similar situation where no A/V program was installed on a
neighbor's computer. I placed the installation file for a free program
in a TEMP directory and suggested they ask the owner of the computer if
they wanted it or another program. Nothing is yet installed. Boy, this
beer is cold!!!
 
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VanguardLH
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-14-2011
James D Andrews wrote:

> This is not a real **** me off, kind of thing - more of just an
> irritant, but I wonder if some of you other guys get this and how you
> deal with it when it happens.
>
> In my case, I'm the go-to guy for several family members' computers
> (which is why I'm here asking questions so much).
>
> When they have a problem, they come to me. I fix the problem. It
> often involves some kind of malware, but other software issues as well.
> I tell them how to avoid the problem in the future, usually by
> installing something in particular, e.g. Avast, Malwarebytes, etc. if
> they're having problems with their already installed stuff. (Really,
> who uses Panda?) And I give them a link.
>
> Frequently, they ignore this advice and/or look elsewhere. Life
> revolves around Google, it seems, and so many people buy Norton simply
> because it was pre-installed on their computers or such.
>
> Needless to say, a few weeks or months later, I'll get the "something's
> wrong with my computer" call, and the issue is directly related to
> their not doing what I told them to do.
>
> Does this happen to you other guys much, and if so, does it feel like
> fingernails on the chalkboard to you?


Get used to it. It's THEIR property to do with however they want. You
can recommend but you don't own it. You might like a Silverado 3500
because of its versatility to you but your customers might like a Subaru
Outback for how they use their car. Different tastes. Also remember
that you're willing to dig into the software to figure out best-use and
configuration but most users want to install and go and don't want to
make choices on setup or configuration. They want phucking magic
software.

Just remember that it's their property and you're helping them with
THEIR choices. You can guide but you can't force unless you actually
own the stuff.
 
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James D Andrews
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-14-2011
Ken banged his head on his keyboard to write :
> James D Andrews wrote:
>> This is not a real **** me off, kind of thing - more of just an
>> irritant, but I wonder if some of you other guys get this and how you
>> deal with it when it happens.
>>
>> In my case, I'm the go-to guy for several family members' computers
>> (which is why I'm here asking questions so much).
>>
>> When they have a problem, they come to me. I fix the problem. It often
>> involves some kind of malware, but other software issues as well. I tell
>> them how to avoid the problem in the future, usually by installing
>> something in particular, e.g. Avast, Malwarebytes, etc. if they're
>> having problems with their already installed stuff. (Really, who uses
>> Panda?) And I give them a link.
>>
>> Frequently, they ignore this advice and/or look elsewhere. Life revolves
>> around Google, it seems, and so many people buy Norton simply because it
>> was pre-installed on their computers or such.
>>
>> Needless to say, a few weeks or months later, I'll get the "something's
>> wrong with my computer" call, and the issue is directly related to their
>> not doing what I told them to do.
>>
>> Does this happen to you other guys much, and if so, does it feel like
>> fingernails on the chalkboard to you?
>>

>
> One of the realities of life is you cannot help someone who does NOT want to
> be helped. It is painful to watch sometimes, but after having tried to help
> someone several times and ignored, it is time to go get a beer and forget
> about it.


Great idea.

> I had a similar situation where no A/V program was installed on a neighbor's
> computer. I placed the installation file for a free program in a TEMP
> directory and suggested they ask the owner of the computer if they wanted it
> or another program. Nothing is yet installed. Boy, this beer is cold!!!


Cheers!

--
-There are some who call me...
Jim


"Distrust any enterprise that requires new clothes."
- Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)


 
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James D Andrews
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-14-2011
VanguardLH snuck on to your hard drive to scribble:
> James D Andrews wrote:
>
>> This is not a real **** me off, kind of thing - more of just an
>> irritant, but I wonder if some of you other guys get this and how you
>> deal with it when it happens.
>>
>> In my case, I'm the go-to guy for several family members' computers
>> (which is why I'm here asking questions so much).
>>
>> When they have a problem, they come to me. I fix the problem. It
>> often involves some kind of malware, but other software issues as well.
>> I tell them how to avoid the problem in the future, usually by
>> installing something in particular, e.g. Avast, Malwarebytes, etc. if
>> they're having problems with their already installed stuff. (Really,
>> who uses Panda?) And I give them a link.
>>
>> Frequently, they ignore this advice and/or look elsewhere. Life
>> revolves around Google, it seems, and so many people buy Norton simply
>> because it was pre-installed on their computers or such.
>>
>> Needless to say, a few weeks or months later, I'll get the "something's
>> wrong with my computer" call, and the issue is directly related to
>> their not doing what I told them to do.
>>
>> Does this happen to you other guys much, and if so, does it feel like
>> fingernails on the chalkboard to you?

>
> Get used to it. It's THEIR property to do with however they want. You
> can recommend but you don't own it. You might like a Silverado 3500
> because of its versatility to you but your customers might like a Subaru
> Outback for how they use their car. Different tastes. Also remember
> that you're willing to dig into the software to figure out best-use and
> configuration but most users want to install and go and don't want to
> make choices on setup or configuration. They want phucking magic
> software.
>
> Just remember that it's their property and you're helping them with
> THEIR choices. You can guide but you can't force unless you actually
> own the stuff.


Well put. Thanks.

--
-There are some who call me...
Jim


"Distrust any enterprise that requires new clothes."
- Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)


 
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Julie Bove
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-14-2011

"James D Andrews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ivnah8$e3i$(E-Mail Removed)...
> This is not a real **** me off, kind of thing - more of just an irritant,
> but I wonder if some of you other guys get this and how you deal with it
> when it happens.
>
> In my case, I'm the go-to guy for several family members' computers (which
> is why I'm here asking questions so much).
>
> When they have a problem, they come to me. I fix the problem. It often
> involves some kind of malware, but other software issues as well. I tell
> them how to avoid the problem in the future, usually by installing
> something in particular, e.g. Avast, Malwarebytes, etc. if they're having
> problems with their already installed stuff. (Really, who uses Panda?)
> And I give them a link.
>
> Frequently, they ignore this advice and/or look elsewhere. Life revolves
> around Google, it seems, and so many people buy Norton simply because it
> was pre-installed on their computers or such.
>
> Needless to say, a few weeks or months later, I'll get the "something's
> wrong with my computer" call, and the issue is directly related to their
> not doing what I told them to do.
>
> Does this happen to you other guys much, and if so, does it feel like
> fingernails on the chalkboard to you?


My brother is the one in my family. I did ask him about my mouse problem
but he doesn't seem to know. I do know he has told my dad repeatedly not to
download things from the Internet. For years my dad didn't listen to him
and his computer was loaded with malware. Once while I was using his
computer I got malware. I can't remember now what I was doing but I knew it
was malware. It was that thing that will sometimes pop up telling you that
you have a virus. Both of my parents wouldn't listen to me and insisted it
was just their Norton AV. I knew it wasn't. My dad merely rebooted and
said it was fine. So I had to call my brother and he went over and took
care of it.

Another thing my dad does is load all kinds of software on his computer. So
much so that it runs really slowly. Brother has tried to tell him of this
too. He just LOVES software. And he is constantly trying to get it for my
daughter's computer and mine. I finally told him I do not put software on
my computer. And I don't. Unless it is something I really need. I am not
a big gamer. For my needs there are plenty of games online. But he and my
mom love their games and are always buying new ones. Me? I go through my
computer a couple of times a year and take off what I don't use or need any
more. Now that I am usually the only one using the computer there isn't
much to remove any more.


 
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Julie Bove
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-14-2011

"Paul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ivnce3$r07$(E-Mail Removed)...
> James D Andrews wrote:
>> This is not a real **** me off, kind of thing - more of just an irritant,
>> but I wonder if some of you other guys get this and how you deal with it
>> when it happens.
>>
>> In my case, I'm the go-to guy for several family members' computers
>> (which is why I'm here asking questions so much).
>>
>> When they have a problem, they come to me. I fix the problem. It often
>> involves some kind of malware, but other software issues as well. I tell
>> them how to avoid the problem in the future, usually by installing
>> something in particular, e.g. Avast, Malwarebytes, etc. if they're having
>> problems with their already installed stuff. (Really, who uses Panda?)
>> And I give them a link.
>>
>> Frequently, they ignore this advice and/or look elsewhere. Life revolves
>> around Google, it seems, and so many people buy Norton simply because it
>> was pre-installed on their computers or such.
>>
>> Needless to say, a few weeks or months later, I'll get the "something's
>> wrong with my computer" call, and the issue is directly related to their
>> not doing what I told them to do.
>>
>> Does this happen to you other guys much, and if so, does it feel like
>> fingernails on the chalkboard to you?
>>

>
> Well, what goes around, comes around.
>
> If I say to my brother the mechanic, "my car is making
> this funny noise", he'll say "Isn't that the same noise
> it was making the last time you visited me ?".
>
> And if I go to my brother-in-law the doctor and
> say "it hurts when I do this", he'll say "well,
> if it hurts, then don't do that".
>
> So the "shoe can be on the other foot".
>
> *******
>
> You can't expect people with varying levels of
> computer phobia, to exercise perfectly linear
> or rational thinking. Many of their responses
> will be an impulse, such as "well, I visited these
> 20 Google pages, and none of the answers make
> sense, so in revenge, I'm going to run this
> registry polisher and see what happens". Or the
> "maybe if I delete files like a madman, something
> good will happen". I always enjoy that approach.
>
> If the next time you visit, the computer is
> almost unrecognizable due to "user input", that's
> to be expected.
>
> It is possible for computers to be designed like
> appliances. For example, there was a machine set up
> as a "more or less electric typewriter", but being
> limited to a single function, the thrill wears off
> pretty rapidly. Having machines which are not tied
> down, certainly means they have the potential to do
> more, but with the side effect that they're easier
> to break.
>
> You could always install SteadyState, but that would be
> a mean thing to do. I can imagine the look on a
> relative's face, if you turned their machine into
> a machine like they offer at the public library
> The public library computer - reboots between users,
> and won't save anything to the hard drive
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SteadyState
>
> "Discard mode: The cache is cleared upon every reboot,
> thus returning the system to its previous state."
>


Heh. I am the file deleter! But... I am careful. I only delete it if I
know what it is. I did get a registry cleaner that actually did do
something for me.

When I got this computer I put some cooking software on here only to realize
that it wasn't Mastercook but some piece of crap someone gave me as a gift.
I pitched it in the trash and then uninstalled it. Or so I thought. Then
the next time I rebooted there was something left of it on there but I no
longer had the CDs. I now know I shouldn't have tossed them. But... None
of the things my brother told me to do worked. I finally got the registry
cleaner and it took off whatever it was. Fine. But I haven't needed it
since.


 
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James D Andrews
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-15-2011
Julie Bove snuck on to your hard drive to scribble:
> "Paul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:ivnce3$r07$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> James D Andrews wrote:
>>> This is not a real **** me off, kind of thing - more of just an irritant,
>>> but I wonder if some of you other guys get this and how you deal with it
>>> when it happens.
>>>
>>> In my case, I'm the go-to guy for several family members' computers (which
>>> is why I'm here asking questions so much).
>>>
>>> When they have a problem, they come to me. I fix the problem. It often
>>> involves some kind of malware, but other software issues as well. I tell
>>> them how to avoid the problem in the future, usually by installing
>>> something in particular, e.g. Avast, Malwarebytes, etc. if they're having
>>> problems with their already installed stuff. (Really, who uses Panda?)
>>> And I give them a link.
>>>
>>> Frequently, they ignore this advice and/or look elsewhere. Life revolves
>>> around Google, it seems, and so many people buy Norton simply because it
>>> was pre-installed on their computers or such.
>>>
>>> Needless to say, a few weeks or months later, I'll get the "something's
>>> wrong with my computer" call, and the issue is directly related to their
>>> not doing what I told them to do.
>>>
>>> Does this happen to you other guys much, and if so, does it feel like
>>> fingernails on the chalkboard to you?
>>>

>>
>> Well, what goes around, comes around.
>>
>> If I say to my brother the mechanic, "my car is making
>> this funny noise", he'll say "Isn't that the same noise
>> it was making the last time you visited me ?".
>>
>> And if I go to my brother-in-law the doctor and
>> say "it hurts when I do this", he'll say "well,
>> if it hurts, then don't do that".
>>
>> So the "shoe can be on the other foot".
>>
>> *******
>>
>> You can't expect people with varying levels of
>> computer phobia, to exercise perfectly linear
>> or rational thinking. Many of their responses
>> will be an impulse, such as "well, I visited these
>> 20 Google pages, and none of the answers make
>> sense, so in revenge, I'm going to run this
>> registry polisher and see what happens". Or the
>> "maybe if I delete files like a madman, something
>> good will happen". I always enjoy that approach.
>>
>> If the next time you visit, the computer is
>> almost unrecognizable due to "user input", that's
>> to be expected.
>>
>> It is possible for computers to be designed like
>> appliances. For example, there was a machine set up
>> as a "more or less electric typewriter", but being
>> limited to a single function, the thrill wears off
>> pretty rapidly. Having machines which are not tied
>> down, certainly means they have the potential to do
>> more, but with the side effect that they're easier
>> to break.
>>
>> You could always install SteadyState, but that would be
>> a mean thing to do. I can imagine the look on a
>> relative's face, if you turned their machine into
>> a machine like they offer at the public library
>> The public library computer - reboots between users,
>> and won't save anything to the hard drive
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SteadyState
>>
>> "Discard mode: The cache is cleared upon every reboot,
>> thus returning the system to its previous state."
>>

>
> Heh. I am the file deleter! But... I am careful. I only delete it if I
> know what it is. I did get a registry cleaner that actually did do something
> for me.
>
> When I got this computer I put some cooking software on here only to realize
> that it wasn't Mastercook but some piece of crap someone gave me as a gift. I
> pitched it in the trash and then uninstalled it. Or so I thought. Then the
> next time I rebooted there was something left of it on there but I no longer
> had the CDs. I now know I shouldn't have tossed them. But... None of the
> things my brother told me to do worked. I finally got the registry cleaner
> and it took off whatever it was. Fine. But I haven't needed it since.


CCleaner?
That's usually pretty safe if done right.

--
-There are some who call me...
Jim


"Do, or do not. There is no 'try'."
- Yoda ('The Empire Strikes Back')


 
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