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SSL client program

 
 
Stone
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-13-2011
Dear developers,

I am trying to write some client program which will open port 5000 on
the client side and connect to the computer where is run daemon which
listen on the port 5000.
Those port should be secured over SSL.
I have build up the C++ daemon which listen on that port together with
SSL and when I am writing
command:
openssl s_client -ssl3 -connect 192.168.0.120:9000
then in the log of daemon I can see that connection was establish and
working correctly.
Including server certificate, SSL handshake and Secure Renegotiation

I would like to created some client in Java but there I have some
problems.
When I run Java client application the in the daemon I see message:

24741:error:1408F10B:SSL routines:SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version
number:s3_pkt.c:295:

My Java code is:
/*
* To change this template, choose Tools | Templates
* and open the template in the editor.
*/
package ssltest;

import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;
import java.util.*;
import javax.net.ssl.*;
import java.security.cert.*;
/**
*
*/
public class SSLTest {

private int port = 5000;
private SSLSocketFactory sslSocketFactory;
private SSLSocket connection;
private SSLContext sslContext;
private TrustManager[] trustManager;
private PrintWriter outStream;
private BufferedReader inStream;
/**
* @param args the command line arguments
*/
public static void main(String[] args) {
// TODO code application logic here
System.out.println("Start");
SSLTest e = new SSLTest();
}

public SSLTest()
{
System.out.println("Connecting to 192.168.0.120 to port
5000");
connectTo();
}
private void initializeSSLContext() throws Exception {
try {
sslContext = SSLContext.getInstance("SSLv3");
System.out.println("Contents with TLSv1 was initiated");
sslContext.init(null, trustManager, new
java.security.SecureRandom());
System.out.println("Contents with TLSv1 was initiated with
trustManager");

HttpsURLConnection.setDefaultSSLSocketFactory(sslC ontext.getSocketFactory());
HostnameVerifier hv = new HostnameVerifier() {
public boolean verify(String string, SSLSession ssls)
{
System.out.println("Warning: URL Host: "+string +
" vs. " + ssls.getPeerHost());
return true;
}
};
HttpsURLConnection.setDefaultHostnameVerifier(hv);
sslSocketFactory = sslContext.getSocketFactory();
System.out.println("SSL Socket Factory is done");
} catch (java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException e) {
e.printStackTrace(System.out);
throw e;
} catch (java.security.KeyManagementException e) {
e.printStackTrace(System.out);
throw e;
}
}
private final void initializeTrustManager() throws Exception {
// init new TrustManager
trustManager = new TrustManager[] {
new X509TrustManager()
{
public java.security.cert.X509Certificate[]
getAcceptedIssuers() {
System.out.println("InitializeTrustManager:
getAcceptedIssuers:");
return null;
}

public void checkClientTrusted(
java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] certs,
String authType) {
System.out.println("initializeTrustmanager:
checkClientTrusted:" + certs[0]
+ " authTyp:" + authType);
}

public void checkServerTrusted(
java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] certs,
String authType) {
System.out.println("InitializeTrustManager:
checkServerTrusted:"
+ certs[0].getIssuerDN() + " authTyp:" +
authType);

}
public boolean isClientTrusted(X509Certificate[] arg0)
{
return true;
}
public boolean isServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] arg0)
{
return true;
}
}
};
}
public void connectTo()
{
try
{
System.out.println("Initialization of trust Manager");
initializeTrustManager();
System.out.println("Initialization of SSL Context");
initializeSSLContext();
// open a socket to the server
connection =
(SSLSocket)sslSocketFactory.createSocket("192.168. 0.120", port);
//connection.setSSLParameters(null)
//connection.startHandshake();
//URL u = new URL("https://192.168.0.120:5000/");
//HttpsURLConnection http = (HttpsURLConnection)
u.openConnection();

//java.security.cert.Certificate[] serverCerts =
connection.getSession().getPeerCertificates();
// open streams for reading and writing
outStream = new PrintWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(
connection.getOutputStream()),true);

inStream = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(
connection.getInputStream()));
}
catch(Exception e)
{
}
}
}

Those program is run from NetBeans directly

Thank you to all for your help
 
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Daniele Futtorovic
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-13-2011
On 13/05/2011 10:09, Stone allegedly wrote:
> Dear developers,
>
> I am trying to write some client program which will open port 5000 on
> the client side and connect to the computer where is run daemon which
> listen on the port 5000.
> Those port should be secured over SSL.
> I have build up the C++ daemon which listen on that port together with
> SSL and when I am writing
> command:
> openssl s_client -ssl3 -connect 192.168.0.120:9000
> then in the log of daemon I can see that connection was establish and
> working correctly.
> Including server certificate, SSL handshake and Secure Renegotiation
>
> I would like to created some client in Java but there I have some
> problems.
> When I run Java client application the in the daemon I see message:
>
> 24741:error:1408F10B:SSL routines:SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version
> number:s3_pkt.c:295:
>
> My Java code is:


<snip />

> Those program is run from NetBeans directly


"Wrong version number". Check which version your OpenSSL client is,
check which version of Java you're using. Try updating both of them, to
see if it fixes it. If that doesn't help, are you tied to SSL 3.0? Java
supports TLS out-of-the-box.

Google for "SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version number:" did yield a lot of
results.

HTH.

--
DF.
An escaped convict once said to me:
"Alcatraz is the place to be"
 
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Daniele Futtorovic
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-13-2011
On 13/05/2011 18:39, Daniele Futtorovic allegedly wrote:
> On 13/05/2011 10:09, Stone allegedly wrote:
>> Dear developers,
>>
>> I am trying to write some client program which will open port 5000 on
>> the client side and connect to the computer where is run daemon which
>> listen on the port 5000.
>> Those port should be secured over SSL.
>> I have build up the C++ daemon which listen on that port together with
>> SSL and when I am writing
>> command:
>> openssl s_client -ssl3 -connect 192.168.0.120:9000
>> then in the log of daemon I can see that connection was establish and
>> working correctly.
>> Including server certificate, SSL handshake and Secure Renegotiation
>>
>> I would like to created some client in Java but there I have some
>> problems.
>> When I run Java client application the in the daemon I see message:
>>
>> 24741:error:1408F10B:SSL routines:SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version
>> number:s3_pkt.c:295:
>>
>> My Java code is:

>
> <snip />
>
>> Those program is run from NetBeans directly

>
> "Wrong version number". Check which version your OpenSSL client is,
> check which version of Java you're using. Try updating both of them, to
> see if it fixes it. If that doesn't help, are you tied to SSL 3.0? Java
> supports TLS out-of-the-box.
>
> Google for "SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version number:" did yield a lot of
> results.
>
> HTH.
>


Also, check whether you're using the Sun Provider. Find out the which
class the SSLContext instance you're getting is.

 
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Stone
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-14-2011
On 13 kvě, 18:39, Daniele Futtorovic <da.futt.n...@laposte-dot-
net.invalid> wrote:
> On 13/05/2011 10:09, Stone allegedly wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > Dear developers,

>
> > I am trying to write some client program which will open port 5000 on
> > the client side and connect to the computer where is run daemon which
> > listen on the port 5000.
> > Those port should be secured over SSL.
> > I have build up the C++ daemon which listen on that port together with
> > SSL and when I am writing
> > command:
> > openssl s_client -ssl3 -connect 192.168.0.120:9000
> > then in the log of daemon I can see that connection was establish and
> > working correctly.
> > Including server certificate, SSL handshake and Secure Renegotiation

>
> > I would like to created some client in Java but there I have some
> > problems.
> > When I run Java client application the in the daemon I see message:

>
> > 24741:error:1408F10B:SSL routines:SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version
> > number:s3_pkt.c:295:

>
> > My Java code is:

>
> <snip />
>
> > Those program is run from NetBeans directly

>
> "Wrong version number". Check which version your OpenSSL client is,
> check which version of Java you're using. Try updating both of them, to
> see if it fixes it. If that doesn't help, are you tied to SSL 3.0? Java
> supports TLS out-of-the-box.
>
> Google for "SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version number:" did yield a lot of
> results.
>
> HTH.
>
> --
> DF.
> An escaped convict once said to me:
> "Alcatraz is the place to be"


I hopen that openssl -version command or similar syntax will show me
what version of openssl is used.
Could you please let me know how I can check in netbeans what version
is used in NetBeans. How I can tied SSL 3.0 with my JAVA. I thought
that it is enought to writedown SSLContext.getInstance("TLSv1") or
SSLContext.getInstance("SSLv3").
 
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Stone
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-14-2011
On 13 kvě, 18:57, Daniele Futtorovic <da.futt.n...@laposte-dot-
net.invalid> wrote:
> On 13/05/2011 18:39, Daniele Futtorovic allegedly wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 13/05/2011 10:09, Stone allegedly wrote:
> >> Dear developers,

>
> >> I am trying to write some client program which will open port 5000 on
> >> the client side and connect to the computer where is run daemon which
> >> listen on the port 5000.
> >> Those port should be secured over SSL.
> >> I have build up the C++ daemon which listen on that port together with
> >> SSL and when I am writing
> >> command:
> >> openssl s_client -ssl3 -connect 192.168.0.120:9000
> >> then in the log of daemon I can see that connection was establish and
> >> working correctly.
> >> Including server certificate, SSL handshake and Secure Renegotiation

>
> >> I would like to created some client in Java but there I have some
> >> problems.
> >> When I run Java client application the in the daemon I see message:

>
> >> 24741:error:1408F10B:SSL routines:SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version
> >> number:s3_pkt.c:295:

>
> >> My Java code is:

>
> > <snip />

>
> >> Those program is run from NetBeans directly

>
> > "Wrong version number". Check which version your OpenSSL client is,
> > check which version of Java you're using. Try updating both of them, to
> > see if it fixes it. If that doesn't help, are you tied to SSL 3.0? Java
> > supports TLS out-of-the-box.

>
> > Google for "SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version number:" did yield a lot of
> > results.

>
> > HTH.

>
> Also, check whether you're using the Sun Provider. Find out the which
> class the SSLContext instance you're getting is.



This I do not understand. I am using java JRE from Sun Java (or
Oracle) pages.
Also JDK is installed on the my computer.
How can I find what SSLContext instace is using?

One thing which I have observed during my tests is:
When my Java class is trying to connect openssl s_server all is
working fine.
When openssl s_client is trying to connect my C++ daemon that all is
working fine as well.
But when my Java class is trying to connect my C++ daemon that it
failed with the error described above.

Thank you for your help.

 
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Stone
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-14-2011
On 14 kvě, 17:34, Daniele Futtorovic <da.futt.n...@laposte-dot-
net.invalid> wrote:
> On 14/05/2011 10:54, Stone allegedly wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 13 kvě, 18:57, Daniele Futtorovic<da.futt.n...@laposte-dot-
> > net.invalid> *wrote:
> >> On 13/05/2011 18:39, Daniele Futtorovic allegedly wrote:

>
> >>> On 13/05/2011 10:09, Stone allegedly wrote:
> >>>> Dear developers,

>
> >>>> I am trying to write some client program which will open port 5000 on
> >>>> the client side and connect to the computer where is run daemon which
> >>>> listen on the port 5000.
> >>>> Those port should be secured over SSL.
> >>>> I have build up the C++ daemon which listen on that port together with
> >>>> SSL and when I am writing
> >>>> command:
> >>>> openssl s_client -ssl3 -connect 192.168.0.120:9000
> >>>> then in the log of daemon I can see that connection was establish and
> >>>> working correctly.
> >>>> Including server certificate, SSL handshake and Secure Renegotiation

>
> >>>> I would like to created some client in Java but there I have some
> >>>> problems.
> >>>> When I run Java client application the in the daemon I see message:

>
> >>>> 24741:error:1408F10B:SSL routines:SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version
> >>>> number:s3_pkt.c:295:

>
> >>>> My Java code is:

>
> >>> <snip />

>
> >>>> Those program is run from NetBeans directly

>
> >>> "Wrong version number". Check which version your OpenSSL client is,
> >>> check which version of Java you're using. Try updating both of them, to
> >>> see if it fixes it. If that doesn't help, are you tied to SSL 3.0? Java
> >>> supports TLS out-of-the-box.

>
> >>> Google for "SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version number:" did yield a lot of
> >>> results.

>
> >>> HTH.

>
> >> Also, check whether you're using the Sun Provider. Find out the which
> >> class the SSLContext instance you're getting is.

>
> > This I do not understand. I am using java JRE from Sun Java (or
> > Oracle) pages.
> > Also JDK is installed on the my computer.
> > How can I find what SSLContext instace is using?

>
> > One thing which I have observed during my tests is:
> > When my Java class is trying to connect openssl s_server all is
> > working fine.
> > When openssl s_client is trying to connect my C++ daemon that all is
> > working fine as well.
> > But when my Java class is trying to connect my C++ daemon that it
> > failed with the error described above.

>
> I misunderstood you. I thought you were calling OpenSSL from your C++
> daemon, that OpenSSL was actually your daemon. So the problem appears to
> be between what your Java program sends and what your C++ daemon
> expects, not between what your Java program sends and OpenSSL, as I had
> surmised.
>
> One way to check what provider your JRE is using is simply to do:
> * SSLContext.getInstance("SSLv3").getClass().getName ()
> and to print out the result.
>
> I don't know how you can check what whichever C++ library ("s3_pkt.c")
> you're using expects, but I think the problem is between those two.
>
> As I mentioned, you might get out of your troubles simply by updating
> the libraries you're using (JRE and C++) to the latest versions. You can
> also search the web for the error you're getting. Sorry, but that's all
> I can currently think of.
>
> --
> DF.
> An escaped convict once said to me:
> "Alcatraz is the place to be"


The princip of my program should be Java applet has to communicate
with server on the specific port which should be secured over OpenSSL.
Both have to use libssl library.

I have found some articles like:
(for Java)
http://www.exampledepot.com/egs/java...sl/Server.html
http://stilius.net/java/java_ssl.php

(for C++)
http://www.metalshell.com/source_cod...r_Example.html
http://h71000.www7.hp.com/doc/83fina...7/ch05s04.html
 
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Stone
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-14-2011
On 14 kvě, 17:34, Daniele Futtorovic <da.futt.n...@laposte-dot-
net.invalid> wrote:
> On 14/05/2011 10:54, Stone allegedly wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 13 kvě, 18:57, Daniele Futtorovic<da.futt.n...@laposte-dot-
> > net.invalid> *wrote:
> >> On 13/05/2011 18:39, Daniele Futtorovic allegedly wrote:

>
> >>> On 13/05/2011 10:09, Stone allegedly wrote:
> >>>> Dear developers,

>
> >>>> I am trying to write some client program which will open port 5000 on
> >>>> the client side and connect to the computer where is run daemon which
> >>>> listen on the port 5000.
> >>>> Those port should be secured over SSL.
> >>>> I have build up the C++ daemon which listen on that port together with
> >>>> SSL and when I am writing
> >>>> command:
> >>>> openssl s_client -ssl3 -connect 192.168.0.120:9000
> >>>> then in the log of daemon I can see that connection was establish and
> >>>> working correctly.
> >>>> Including server certificate, SSL handshake and Secure Renegotiation

>
> >>>> I would like to created some client in Java but there I have some
> >>>> problems.
> >>>> When I run Java client application the in the daemon I see message:

>
> >>>> 24741:error:1408F10B:SSL routines:SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version
> >>>> number:s3_pkt.c:295:

>
> >>>> My Java code is:

>
> >>> <snip />

>
> >>>> Those program is run from NetBeans directly

>
> >>> "Wrong version number". Check which version your OpenSSL client is,
> >>> check which version of Java you're using. Try updating both of them, to
> >>> see if it fixes it. If that doesn't help, are you tied to SSL 3.0? Java
> >>> supports TLS out-of-the-box.

>
> >>> Google for "SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version number:" did yield a lot of
> >>> results.

>
> >>> HTH.

>
> >> Also, check whether you're using the Sun Provider. Find out the which
> >> class the SSLContext instance you're getting is.

>
> > This I do not understand. I am using java JRE from Sun Java (or
> > Oracle) pages.
> > Also JDK is installed on the my computer.
> > How can I find what SSLContext instace is using?

>
> > One thing which I have observed during my tests is:
> > When my Java class is trying to connect openssl s_server all is
> > working fine.
> > When openssl s_client is trying to connect my C++ daemon that all is
> > working fine as well.
> > But when my Java class is trying to connect my C++ daemon that it
> > failed with the error described above.

>
> I misunderstood you. I thought you were calling OpenSSL from your C++
> daemon, that OpenSSL was actually your daemon. So the problem appears to
> be between what your Java program sends and what your C++ daemon
> expects, not between what your Java program sends and OpenSSL, as I had
> surmised.
>
> One way to check what provider your JRE is using is simply to do:
> * SSLContext.getInstance("SSLv3").getClass().getName ()
> and to print out the result.
>
> I don't know how you can check what whichever C++ library ("s3_pkt.c")
> you're using expects, but I think the problem is between those two.
>
> As I mentioned, you might get out of your troubles simply by updating
> the libraries you're using (JRE and C++) to the latest versions. You can
> also search the web for the error you're getting. Sorry, but that's all
> I can currently think of.
>
> --
> DF.
> An escaped convict once said to me:
> "Alcatraz is the place to be"


You mentioned:
>So the problem appears to
>be between what your Java program sends and what your C++ daemon
>expects, not between what your Java program sends and OpenSSL, as I had
>surmised.


Does it mean that in Java code should be someone encoded message for C+
+ daemon?
Best Regards
Petr
 
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Stone
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-14-2011
On May 14, 5:34*pm, Daniele Futtorovic <da.futt.n...@laposte-dot-
net.invalid> wrote:
> On 14/05/2011 10:54, Stone allegedly wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 13 kvě, 18:57, Daniele Futtorovic<da.futt.n...@laposte-dot-
> > net.invalid> *wrote:
> >> On 13/05/2011 18:39, Daniele Futtorovic allegedly wrote:

>
> >>> On 13/05/2011 10:09, Stone allegedly wrote:
> >>>> Dear developers,

>
> >>>> I am trying to write some client program which will open port 5000 on
> >>>> the client side and connect to the computer where is run daemon which
> >>>> listen on the port 5000.
> >>>> Those port should be secured over SSL.
> >>>> I have build up the C++ daemon which listen on that port together with
> >>>> SSL and when I am writing
> >>>> command:
> >>>> openssl s_client -ssl3 -connect 192.168.0.120:9000
> >>>> then in the log of daemon I can see that connection was establish and
> >>>> working correctly.
> >>>> Including server certificate, SSL handshake and Secure Renegotiation

>
> >>>> I would like to created some client in Java but there I have some
> >>>> problems.
> >>>> When I run Java client application the in the daemon I see message:

>
> >>>> 24741:error:1408F10B:SSL routines:SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version
> >>>> number:s3_pkt.c:295:

>
> >>>> My Java code is:

>
> >>> <snip />

>
> >>>> Those program is run from NetBeans directly

>
> >>> "Wrong version number". Check which version your OpenSSL client is,
> >>> check which version of Java you're using. Try updating both of them, to
> >>> see if it fixes it. If that doesn't help, are you tied to SSL 3.0? Java
> >>> supports TLS out-of-the-box.

>
> >>> Google for "SSL3_GET_RECORD:wrong version number:" did yield a lot of
> >>> results.

>
> >>> HTH.

>
> >> Also, check whether you're using the Sun Provider. Find out the which
> >> class the SSLContext instance you're getting is.

>
> > This I do not understand. I am using java JRE from Sun Java (or
> > Oracle) pages.
> > Also JDK is installed on the my computer.
> > How can I find what SSLContext instace is using?

>
> > One thing which I have observed during my tests is:
> > When my Java class is trying to connect openssl s_server all is
> > working fine.
> > When openssl s_client is trying to connect my C++ daemon that all is
> > working fine as well.
> > But when my Java class is trying to connect my C++ daemon that it
> > failed with the error described above.

>
> I misunderstood you. I thought you were calling OpenSSL from your C++
> daemon, that OpenSSL was actually your daemon. So the problem appears to
> be between what your Java program sends and what your C++ daemon
> expects, not between what your Java program sends and OpenSSL, as I had
> surmised.
>
> One way to check what provider your JRE is using is simply to do:
> * SSLContext.getInstance("SSLv3").getClass().getName ()
> and to print out the result.
>
> I don't know how you can check what whichever C++ library ("s3_pkt.c")
> you're using expects, but I think the problem is between those two.
>
> As I mentioned, you might get out of your troubles simply by updating
> the libraries you're using (JRE and C++) to the latest versions. You can
> also search the web for the error you're getting. Sorry, but that's all
> I can currently think of.
>
> --
> DF.
> An escaped convict once said to me:
> "Alcatraz is the place to be"


I have write down to my code your Java code and result of
SSLContext.getInstance("TLS").getClass().getName() is
"javax.net.ssl.SSLContext"

Result is the same for SSLv3.

Best regards
Petr
 
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Daniele Futtorovic
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-14-2011
On 14/05/2011 18:48, Stone allegedly wrote:
> You mentioned:
>> So the problem appears to
>> be between what your Java program sends and what your C++ daemon
>> expects, not between what your Java program sends and OpenSSL, as I had
>> surmised.

>
> Does it mean that in Java code should be someone encoded message for C+
> + daemon?


(Please don't quote signatures)

No, it means that your C++ daemon doesn't understand the SSL version
Java is talking to it with.

> I have write down to my code your Java code and result of
> SSLContext.getInstance("TLS").getClass().getName() is
> "javax.net.ssl.SSLContext"


Sorry, my mistake. You need to have a look at:
SSLContext.getInstance( [protocol] ).getProvider();

If it prints something with "SunJSSE", then you have the default one.

--
DF.
An escaped convict once said to me:
"Alcatraz is the place to be"
 
Reply With Quote
 
Stone
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-14-2011
On 14 kvě, 21:23, Daniele Futtorovic <da.futt.n...@laposte-dot-
net.invalid> wrote:
> On 14/05/2011 18:48, Stone allegedly wrote:
>
> > You mentioned:
> >> So the problem appears to
> >> be between what your Java program sends and what your C++ daemon
> >> expects, not between what your Java program sends and OpenSSL, as I had
> >> surmised.

>
> > Does it mean that in Java code should be someone encoded message for C+
> > + daemon?

>
> (Please don't quote signatures)
>
> No, it means that your C++ daemon doesn't understand the SSL version
> Java is talking to it with.
>
> > I have write down to my code your Java code and result of
> > SSLContext.getInstance("TLS").getClass().getName() *is
> > "javax.net.ssl.SSLContext"

>
> Sorry, my mistake. You need to have a look at:
> * SSLContext.getInstance( [protocol] ).getProvider();
>
> If it prints something with "SunJSSE", then you have the default one.
>
> --
> DF.
> An escaped convict once said to me:
> "Alcatraz is the place to be"


Yes it prints "SunJSSE version 1.6".
It is problem? What should be mentioned here?
Shall I install something different?

I still do not understand where can be a problem?
best regards
Petr
 
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