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Re: Python IDE/text-editor

 
 
Chris Angelico
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      04-16-2011
Based on the comments here, it seems that emacs would have to be the
editor-in-chief for programmers. I currently use SciTE at work; is it
reasonable to, effectively, bill my employer for the time it'll take
me to learn emacs? I'm using a lot of the same features that the OP
was requesting (multiple files open at once, etc), plus I like syntax
highlighting (multiple languages necessary - I'm often developing
simultaneously in C++, Pike, PHP, and gnu make, as well as Python).

My current "main editors" are SciTE when I have a GUI, and nano when I
don't (over ssh and such). Mastering emacs would definitely take time;
I'm not really sure if I can justify it ("Chris, what did you achieve
this week?" "I learned how to get emacs to make coffee.")...

Chris Angelico
 
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rusi
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      04-16-2011
On Apr 16, 9:13*pm, Chris Angelico <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Based on the comments here, it seems that emacs would have to be the
> editor-in-chief for programmers. I currently use SciTE at work; is it
> reasonable to, effectively, bill my employer for the time it'll take
> me to learn emacs?


It takes a day or two to learn emacs.

It takes forever to set it up.

[How many shots of cocaine are are needed to de-addict a cocaine
addict? ]

> I'm using a lot of the same features that the OP
> was requesting (multiple files open at once, etc), plus I like syntax
> highlighting (multiple languages necessary - I'm often developing
> simultaneously in C++, Pike, PHP, and gnu make, as well as Python).
>
> My current "main editors" are SciTE when I have a GUI, and nano when I
> don't (over ssh and such). Mastering emacs would definitely take time;
> I'm not really sure if I can justify it ("Chris, what did you achieve
> this week?" "I learned how to get emacs to make coffee.")...
>
> Chris Angelico




You are being cute and tart.

But the problem is real:
1. emacs can do everything
2. It does everything badly
3. All the competition does it worse

Frankly Ive thought many times of switching to eclipse but the first
few screens send a chill (or something such) down my spine and I limp
back unhappily to emacs...
 
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John Bokma
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      04-16-2011
rusi <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> On Apr 16, 9:13┬*pm, Chris Angelico <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Based on the comments here, it seems that emacs would have to be the
>> editor-in-chief for programmers. I currently use SciTE at work; is it
>> reasonable to, effectively, bill my employer for the time it'll take
>> me to learn emacs?

>
> It takes a day or two to learn emacs.


That's an extremely bold statement. I still haven't learned Emacs and
have read most of the Emacs manual, some parts twice.

Unless you mean openening a file, saving a file, and some basic cursor
movements.

> It takes forever to set it up.


If you mean to make work optimally for your way of editing, probably
true. You can keep fine tuning, adding/testing stuff, etc.


--
John Bokma j3b

Blog: http://johnbokma.com/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/j.j.j.bokma
Freelance Perl & Python Development: http://castleamber.com/
 
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Krzysztof Bieniasz
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      04-16-2011
> It takes a day or two to learn emacs.
>
> It takes forever to set it up.


Remember, Emacs is THE way. It's the light in the darkness, it'll save
your soul and bring you happiness. Isn't it worth the trouble?

Seriously though, when I was setting my Emacs to work with Python I
stumbled upon this:
http://pedrokroger.net/2010/07/confi...-python-ide-2/
Read it and you'll know everything you need to know -- at least to start
with.

KTB
 
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rusi
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      04-17-2011
On Apr 17, 3:19*am, John Bokma <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> rusi <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> > On Apr 16, 9:13*pm, Chris Angelico <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >> Based on the comments here, it seems that emacs would have to be the
> >> editor-in-chief for programmers. I currently use SciTE at work; is it
> >> reasonable to, effectively, bill my employer for the time it'll take
> >> me to learn emacs?

>
> > It takes a day or two to learn emacs.

>
> That's an extremely bold statement. I still haven't learned Emacs and
> have read most of the Emacs manual, some parts twice.
>
> Unless you mean opening a file, saving a file, and some basic cursor
> movements.


Aren't there people (many in fact) who use notepad or equivalent to
write programs?
How many features do they use?
How long would it take to make a map of those same features in emacs?
And add a handful more to make the switchover worthwhile?
 
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rusi
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      04-17-2011
On Apr 17, 4:12*am, Krzysztof Bieniasz
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > It takes a day or two to learn emacs.

>
> > It takes forever to set it up.

>
> Remember, Emacs is THE way. It's the light in the darkness, it'll save
> your soul and bring you happiness. Isn't it worth the trouble?
>
> Seriously though, when I was setting my Emacs to work with Python I
> stumbled upon this:http://pedrokroger.net/2010/07/confi...-python-ide-2/


Thanks: Thats a useful link (if it works -- I have to try it out)
And this just underscores my earlier point:
Getting emacs to work 'any-old-how' is trivial.
Getting it to work optimally is an unending task.
 
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John Bokma
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      04-17-2011
rusi <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> On Apr 17, 3:19┬*am, John Bokma <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> rusi <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>> > On Apr 16, 9:13┬*pm, Chris Angelico <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> >> Based on the comments here, it seems that emacs would have to be the
>> >> editor-in-chief for programmers. I currently use SciTE at work; is it
>> >> reasonable to, effectively, bill my employer for the time it'll take
>> >> me to learn emacs?

>>
>> > It takes a day or two to learn emacs.

>>
>> That's an extremely bold statement. I still haven't learned Emacs and
>> have read most of the Emacs manual, some parts twice.
>>
>> Unless you mean opening a file, saving a file, and some basic cursor
>> movements.

>
> Aren't there people (many in fact) who use notepad or equivalent to
> write programs?
> How many features do they use?
> How long would it take to make a map of those same features in emacs?


Yeah, if you bring it down to open a file, save a file, and move the
cursor around, sure you can do that in a day or two (two since you have
to get used to the "weird" key bindings).

> And add a handful more to make the switchover worthwhile?


That's somewhat I did: I used TextPad a lot, and at first I looked for
how to do what I could in TextPad in Emacs (hence reading the book). But
that took longer than a day.

--
John Bokma j3b

Blog: http://johnbokma.com/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/j.j.j.bokma
Freelance Perl & Python Development: http://castleamber.com/
 
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rusi
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      04-17-2011
On Apr 17, 8:22*am, John Bokma <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> rusi <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> > On Apr 17, 3:19*am, John Bokma <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >> rusi <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> >> > On Apr 16, 9:13*pm, Chris Angelico <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >> >> Based on the comments here, it seems that emacs would have to be the
> >> >> editor-in-chief for programmers. I currently use SciTE at work; is it
> >> >> reasonable to, effectively, bill my employer for the time it'll take
> >> >> me to learn emacs?

>
> >> > It takes a day or two to learn emacs.

>
> >> That's an extremely bold statement. I still haven't learned Emacs and
> >> have read most of the Emacs manual, some parts twice.

>
> >> Unless you mean opening a file, saving a file, and some basic cursor
> >> movements.

>
> > Aren't there people (many in fact) who use notepad or equivalent to
> > write programs?
> > How many features do they use?
> > How long would it take to make a map of those same features in emacs?

>
> Yeah, if you bring it down to open a file, save a file, and move the
> cursor around, sure you can do that in a day or two (two since you have
> to get used to the "weird" key bindings).


If all one seeks is 'notepad-equivalence' why use any key-binding?
All this basic ('normal') stuff that other editors do, emacs can also
do from menus alone.

 
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Jorgen Grahn
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      04-17-2011
On Sat, 2011-04-16, Chris Angelico wrote:
> Based on the comments here, it seems that emacs would have to be the
> editor-in-chief for programmers. I currently use SciTE at work; is it
> reasonable to, effectively, bill my employer for the time it'll take
> me to learn emacs? I'm using a lot of the same features that the OP
> was requesting (multiple files open at once, etc), plus I like syntax
> highlighting (multiple languages necessary - I'm often developing
> simultaneously in C++, Pike, PHP, and gnu make, as well as Python).


Your editor seems popular, free, cross-platform and capable ... if you
already know it well, I can't see why you should switch.

Unless you're truly not productive in SciTE, but I'd have to watch
you use it for hours to tell.

(That should really be a new job title. Just as there are aerobics
instructors or whatever at the gyms to help you use the equipment
there safely and efficiently, there should be text editor instructors!)

/Jorgen

--
// Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
\X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
 
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Chris Angelico
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      04-17-2011
On Sun, Apr 17, 2011 at 5:17 PM, Jorgen Grahn <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> (That should really be a new job title. Just as there are aerobics
> instructors or whatever at the gyms to help you use the equipment
> there safely and efficiently, there should be text editor instructors!)


You nearly had me crack up laughing in the middle of a church
meeting... Yes! We need text editor instructors.

"Don't forget that you can press F7 to make."

"You could do that more easily with C-x M-c M-butterfly."

Chris Angelico
 
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