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Is the average IQ of C programmers less than that of C++ programmers?

 
 
BartC
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      03-30-2011
"jacob navia" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:imurfb$csl$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Le 29/03/11 21:57, William Ahern a écrit :
>> Chris H<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> Apparently English is the easiest language to get a basic grasp and be
>>> understood.

>>
>> Citations? No anecdotes, please.
>>

>
> Forming the past of a verb?
>
> Just add "ed" and learn the few irregulars. No complicated rules.
>
> No distinction between the familiar "you" and the honored person "you"
> like Spanish or French.


Unless you're conversing with royalty.

> Concise language. A text in English is 30-40% smaller than the same text
> in French or other Latin languages.
>
> The universal "The": you just say "The table" and do not have to worry
> if the table is a female/male/no sex/ "thing" like in other languages
> like Spanish.
>
> Reading English is easy, and understanding the basics is easier to learn
> than other languages.


Except that spelling is bit of a black art.

Then there are words that are spelt the same but pronounced differently,
depending on meaning; and words that sound the same but spelt differently.
Plus words that are spelt the same, sound the same, but can have a dozen
different meanings!

And how do you pronounce a "-ough" ending? Apparently there are supposed to
be 9 different ways. "Laughter" has only one pronunciation, but put an "S"
at the start, and it's completely different. Etc. etc.

I think one of the simplest, and most orthogonal languages is supposed to be
Ido. The trouble is there are only a couple of thousand speakers in the
world.

--
Bartc

 
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osmium
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      03-30-2011
"Kenneth Brody" wrote:

>> Also most of the time A native English speaker can easily understand
>> poor grammar and wrong word usage.

>
> Which sounds to me like native English speakers are smarter than native
> speakers of other languages, if it's true that they are not capable of
> such understanding.


A language can have attributes such as redundancy which promote such
understanding despite mangling. I only, know, kind of, English, so I don't
know if that applies here or not. Or even if the premise is true.

Nevertheless, do you think it would be easier to fix a mangled APL program
or a mangled Cobol program? To me, those are kind of at the extremes of
understanding. There may be other languages more difficult to learn than
APL, but my guess is that this is due to poor documentation for the
contender language.


 
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Ian Collins
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      03-30-2011
On 03/31/11 08:10 AM, BartC wrote:
>
> I think one of the simplest, and most orthogonal languages is supposed
> to be Ido. The trouble is there are only a couple of thousand speakers
> in the world.


The easiest and most orthogonal language I ever learned was Swahili. I
found it an ideal language for a programmer to learn!

--
Ian Collins
 
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Geoff
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      03-30-2011
On Wed, 30 Mar 2011 12:53:17 -0700, William Ahern
<william@wilbur.25thandClement.com> wrote:

>Chris H <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> In message <17q968-le4.ln1@wilbur.25thandClement.com>, William Ahern
>> <william@wilbur.25thandClement.com> writes
>> >Chris H <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> >> Apparently English is the easiest language to get a basic grasp and be
>> >> understood.
>> >
>> >Citations? No anecdotes, please.

>


When I was taking my First Class Radio Telephone license exams you had
to have memorized the ITU phonetic alphabet and demonstrate
proficiency. The letters were all English, "Alpha, Bravo, Charlie,...
but the numerals were all Spanish-French-German with English as cited,
you guessed it, in Wikipedia today:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICAO_sp...lphabet#Digits

A USMC gunney sarge will make you recite the alphabet and numerals
forwards, backwards and middlewards alternating until you can do it in
less than 30 seconds on demand.
 
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Joachim Schmitz
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      03-31-2011
Geoff wrote:
<snip>
> When I was taking my First Class Radio Telephone license exams you had
> to have memorized the ITU phonetic alphabet and demonstrate
> proficiency. The letters were all English, "Alpha, Bravo, Charlie,...
> but the numerals were all Spanish-French-German with English as cited,
> you guessed it, in Wikipedia today:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICAO_sp...lphabet#Digits



Where is the German part in this?

Bye, Jojo
 
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Geoff
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      04-01-2011
On Thu, 31 Mar 2011 10:07:50 +0200, "Joachim Schmitz"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Geoff wrote:
><snip>
>> When I was taking my First Class Radio Telephone license exams you had
>> to have memorized the ITU phonetic alphabet and demonstrate
>> proficiency. The letters were all English, "Alpha, Bravo, Charlie,...
>> but the numerals were all Spanish-French-German with English as cited,
>> you guessed it, in Wikipedia today:
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICAO_sp...lphabet#Digits

>
>
>Where is the German part in this?
>
>Bye, Jojo


Oktoeight.
 
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Joachim Schmitz
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      04-02-2011
Geoff wrote:
> On Thu, 31 Mar 2011 10:07:50 +0200, "Joachim Schmitz"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Geoff wrote:
>> <snip>
>>> When I was taking my First Class Radio Telephone license exams you
>>> had to have memorized the ITU phonetic alphabet and demonstrate
>>> proficiency. The letters were all English, "Alpha, Bravo,
>>> Charlie,... but the numerals were all Spanish-French-German with
>>> English as cited, you guessed it, in Wikipedia today:
>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICAO_sp...lphabet#Digits

>>
>>
>> Where is the German part in this?
>>
>> Bye, Jojo

>
> Oktoeight.


Neither "Okto" nor "Eight" is German.
"Acht" is.

Bye, Jojo
 
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Geoff
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      04-02-2011
On Sat, 2 Apr 2011 12:50:46 +0200, "Joachim Schmitz"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Geoff wrote:
>> On Thu, 31 Mar 2011 10:07:50 +0200, "Joachim Schmitz"
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> Geoff wrote:
>>> <snip>
>>>> When I was taking my First Class Radio Telephone license exams you
>>>> had to have memorized the ITU phonetic alphabet and demonstrate
>>>> proficiency. The letters were all English, "Alpha, Bravo,
>>>> Charlie,... but the numerals were all Spanish-French-German with
>>>> English as cited, you guessed it, in Wikipedia today:
>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICAO_sp...lphabet#Digits
>>>
>>>
>>> Where is the German part in this?
>>>
>>> Bye, Jojo

>>
>> Oktoeight.

>
>Neither "Okto" nor "Eight" is German.
>"Acht" is.
>


Tell that to the ITU. Okto is not in any language but they wrote it
that way. The derivation is from the German acht.

Why do you insist on belaboring this point? It's a system of
clarifying voice communication over noisy channels, nothing more.
 
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Willem
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      04-02-2011
Geoff wrote:
) Tell that to the ITU. Okto is not in any language but they wrote it
) that way. The derivation is from the German acht.

Bullshit; 'octo' (pronounced as 'okto') is Latin for eight.


SaSW, Willem
--
Disclaimer: I am in no way responsible for any of the statements
made in the above text. For all I know I might be
drugged or something..
No I'm not paranoid. You all think I'm paranoid, don't you !
#EOT
 
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Joachim Schmitz
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      04-02-2011
Geoff wrote:
> On Sat, 2 Apr 2011 12:50:46 +0200, "Joachim Schmitz"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Geoff wrote:
>>> On Thu, 31 Mar 2011 10:07:50 +0200, "Joachim Schmitz"
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Geoff wrote:
>>>> <snip>
>>>>> When I was taking my First Class Radio Telephone license exams you
>>>>> had to have memorized the ITU phonetic alphabet and demonstrate
>>>>> proficiency. The letters were all English, "Alpha, Bravo,
>>>>> Charlie,... but the numerals were all Spanish-French-German with
>>>>> English as cited, you guessed it, in Wikipedia today:
>>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICAO_sp...lphabet#Digits
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Where is the German part in this?
>>>>
>>>> Bye, Jojo
>>>
>>> Oktoeight.

>>
>> Neither "Okto" nor "Eight" is German.
>> "Acht" is.
>>

>
> Tell that to the ITU.


Do they claim this to be German?

> Okto is not in any language but they wrote it
> that way. The derivation is from the German acht.


More probably from the Latin octo. German acht maybe derived from that, but
surely not the other way round.

> Why do you insist on belaboring this point?


Pure curiosity.

Bye, Jojo

 
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