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Why I like only C++?

 
 
Paul
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      03-06-2011

"Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
>>
>> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
>>>>
>>>> "Juha Nieminen" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>> Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you
>>>>>> learn
>>>>>> asm.
>>>>>
>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a
>>>>> while.
>>>>>
>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns asm?
>>>>>
>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the underlying
>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
>>>>
>>>
>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
>>>
>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an
>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only exist
>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
>>> region of storage.
>>>

>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non segmented
>> memory model.
>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they have no
>> text segement.
>>
>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer programming
>> world.
>>

>
> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is meant by
> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem with
> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get your
> brain/mental state sorted out.
>

No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you have
clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.

A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you seem to
refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with memory
models.

Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a sentence ,
i.e:
this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called a text
segement.
You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences and
statements ?

 
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Paul
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-06-2011

"Nick Keighley" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
On Mar 6, 1:58 am, "Paul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> "crea" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:98Acp.36919$%(E-Mail Removed)2...


<snip>.

>> Its the low level understanding of what's going on that you're probsbly
>> bonded with, nothing to do with the language syntax.


>At least my C++ programs have a fair chance of running on different
>platforms. asm means I'm tied to today's platform. Plus it'll be ten
>times harder to write the program in the first place.


Normally if you use assembly you don't need it to be portable. With many
embedded systems your only option is to use asm.
Assembly can also do things you can't do in C++, so sometimes its necessary.

As you said it's simply easier to do things in some languages than others.

HTH
Paul.

 
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Paul
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-06-2011

"Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
> On 06/03/2011 13:56, Paul wrote:
>>
>> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
>>>>
>>>> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>>> Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if
>>>>>>>> you
>>>>>>>> learn
>>>>>>>> asm.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a
>>>>>>> while.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns
>>>>>>> asm?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the underlying
>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
>>>>>
>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an
>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only exist
>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
>>>>> region of storage.
>>>>>
>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non segmented
>>>> memory model.
>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they have
>>>> no
>>>> text segement.
>>>>
>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
>>>> programming
>>>> world.
>>>>
>>>
>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is meant
>>> by the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem
>>> with your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get
>>> your brain/mental state sorted out.
>>>

>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you have
>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
>>
>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you seem to
>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with memory
>> models.
>>
>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
>> sentence , i.e:
>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called a
>> text segement.
>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences and
>> statements ?

>
> A "text segment" does not require a segmented memory model:


Yes it does. A memory model with no segments doesn't have a text segment.

>
> "In computing, a code segment, also known as a text segment or simply as
> text, is a phrase used to refer to a portion of memory or of an object
> file that contains executable instructions."

What you are talking about here is a segmented memory model. It's not the
general case for *all* computer programs.

>
> It is possible for the "text segment" and "data segment" to be represented
> by the same "memory segment" on platforms with segmented memory models or
> to be equivalent on platforms without a segmented memory model.

So what is this segment called the "teta" or the "daxt" segment?

> Even on platforms without a segmented memory model it is common for an
> executable file to be structured in such a way that data follows the code.

But there are no segments , no text segment , no data segment no stack
segment. So your statement ref: "after compilation functions (member of
otherwise) only exist as machine code in the text segment" is complete
bullshit.

<snip rest of Leighs tripe.>

 
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Ebenezer
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-06-2011
On Mar 5, 5:59*pm, "crea" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> This is strange. I dont like any project using other languages than C++ (or
> maybe C). Why is this? Somekind of mental bond...
>
> I remember doing *a project with VB in a company. I did not like it at all.


Sorry about that. I don't think I'd like that either. I know a
little Perl, Python and shell scripts, but am mostly interested
in C++. I run across things like this -- http://www.quicklz.com/ [1]
and I'm just glad I haven't spent time learning C# or Java.
The link maybe doesn't prove anything, but I tend to think it does.
Scott Meyers has confessed to being pretty much a C++ only guy.
I think of it like a marriage. I'm happy with C++. It hasn't let
me down.


[1] I've switched to using that compression library. It is
amazing to me how that code is all of nine-hundred some lines.
So far it is working great. Oh and I would like to commend his
license terms here. If you are a small company, say just one
person, it is free.


Brian Wood
Ebenezer Enterprises
http://webEbenezer.net
 
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K4 Monk
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-06-2011
On Mar 6, 6:56*pm, "Paul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>
> news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
>
> > On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:

>
> >> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >>news(E-Mail Removed) om...
> >>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:

>
> >>>> "Juha Nieminen" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >>>>news:4d734116$0$2867$(E-Mail Removed)...
> >>>>> Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you
> >>>>>> learn
> >>>>>> asm.

>
> >>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a
> >>>>> while.

>
> >>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns asm?

>
> >>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the underlying
> >>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
> >>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.

>
> >>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
> >>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.

>
> >>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an
> >>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only exist
> >>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
> >>> region of storage.

>
> >> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non segmented
> >> memory model.
> >> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they have no
> >> text segement.

>
> >> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer programming
> >> world.

>
> > I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is meant by
> > the term "text segment". *The only "memory" problem is the problem with
> > your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get your
> > brain/mental state sorted out.

>
> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you have
> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
>
> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you seem to
> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with memory
> models.
>
> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a sentence ,
> i.e:
> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called a text
> segement.
> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences and
> statements ?


Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just pure
binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
understood them yet).
 
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Paul
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-07-2011

"Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On 06/03/2011 23:40, K4 Monk wrote:
>> On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> "Leigh Johnston"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>
>>> news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>
>>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
>>>
>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>> news(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
>>>
>>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>>>> Paul<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if
>>>>>>>>> you
>>>>>>>>> learn
>>>>>>>>> asm.
>>>
>>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a
>>>>>>>> while.
>>>
>>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns
>>>>>>>> asm?
>>>
>>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the
>>>>>>> underlying
>>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
>>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
>>>
>>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
>>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
>>>
>>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an
>>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only exist
>>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
>>>>>> region of storage.
>>>
>>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non
>>>>> segmented
>>>>> memory model.
>>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they have
>>>>> no
>>>>> text segement.
>>>
>>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
>>>>> programming
>>>>> world.
>>>
>>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is meant
>>>> by
>>>> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem with
>>>> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get your
>>>> brain/mental state sorted out.
>>>
>>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you have
>>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
>>>
>>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you seem to
>>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with memory
>>> models.
>>>
>>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
>>> sentence ,
>>> i.e:
>>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called a
>>> text
>>> segement.
>>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences and
>>> statements ?

>>
>> Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
>> protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just pure
>> binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
>> understood them yet).

>
> No; text and data segments were the same in .COM files; "text segments"
> and "data segments" do not require a segmented memory model; "text
> segment" is computer science term with a specific meaning not requiring a
> segmented memory model.
>

The term "text segment" only has a meaning in the context of a memory model.
If the memory model has no segments there is no text segment.

Leighs *specific* meaning of "text segment" seems to be another typical
example of his verbal diahorrea.



 
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Paul
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-07-2011

"Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
> On 07/03/2011 01:41, Paul wrote:
>>
>> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> On 06/03/2011 23:40, K4 Monk wrote:
>>>> On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>
>>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>>>
>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>>> news(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>>>>>> Paul<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear
>>>>>>>>>>> when/if you
>>>>>>>>>>> learn
>>>>>>>>>>> asm.
>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a
>>>>>>>>>> while.
>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he
>>>>>>>>>> learns asm?
>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the
>>>>>>>>> underlying
>>>>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
>>>>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
>>>>>
>>>>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
>>>>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
>>>>>
>>>>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an
>>>>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only
>>>>>>>> exist
>>>>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
>>>>>>>> region of storage.
>>>>>
>>>>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non
>>>>>>> segmented
>>>>>>> memory model.
>>>>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they
>>>>>>> have no
>>>>>>> text segement.
>>>>>
>>>>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
>>>>>>> programming
>>>>>>> world.
>>>>>
>>>>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is
>>>>>> meant by
>>>>>> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem
>>>>>> with
>>>>>> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get your
>>>>>> brain/mental state sorted out.
>>>>>
>>>>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you
>>>>> have
>>>>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
>>>>>
>>>>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you seem
>>>>> to
>>>>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with memory
>>>>> models.
>>>>>
>>>>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
>>>>> sentence ,
>>>>> i.e:
>>>>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called
>>>>> a text
>>>>> segement.
>>>>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences
>>>>> and
>>>>> statements ?
>>>>
>>>> Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
>>>> protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just pure
>>>> binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
>>>> understood them yet).
>>>
>>> No; text and data segments were the same in .COM files; "text
>>> segments" and "data segments" do not require a segmented memory model;
>>> "text segment" is computer science term with a specific meaning not
>>> requiring a segmented memory model.
>>>

>> The term "text segment" only has a meaning in the context of a memory
>> model. If the memory model has no segments there is no text segment.
>>
>> Leighs *specific* meaning of "text segment" seems to be another typical
>> example of his verbal diahorrea.
>>

>
> "Text segments" do not require a segmented memory model;


Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then..

|<snip>
*waits for the flow of verbal diahorrea to begin*

 
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Paul
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-07-2011

"Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On 07/03/2011 13:47, Paul wrote:
>>
>> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>> On 07/03/2011 01:41, Paul wrote:
>>>>
>>>> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>> On 06/03/2011 23:40, K4 Monk wrote:
>>>>>> On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>>>>> news(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>>>>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>>>>>>>> Paul<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear
>>>>>>>>>>>>> when/if you
>>>>>>>>>>>>> learn
>>>>>>>>>>>>> asm.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in
>>>>>>>>>>>> a
>>>>>>>>>>>> while.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he
>>>>>>>>>>>> learns asm?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the
>>>>>>>>>>> underlying
>>>>>>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
>>>>>>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't
>>>>>>>>>> keep
>>>>>>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of
>>>>>>>>>> an
>>>>>>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only
>>>>>>>>>> exist
>>>>>>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
>>>>>>>>>> region of storage.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non
>>>>>>>>> segmented
>>>>>>>>> memory model.
>>>>>>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they
>>>>>>>>> have no
>>>>>>>>> text segement.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
>>>>>>>>> programming
>>>>>>>>> world.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is
>>>>>>>> meant by
>>>>>>>> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem
>>>>>>>> with
>>>>>>>> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get
>>>>>>>> your
>>>>>>>> brain/mental state sorted out.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you
>>>>>>> have
>>>>>>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you
>>>>>>> seem to
>>>>>>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with
>>>>>>> memory
>>>>>>> models.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
>>>>>>> sentence ,
>>>>>>> i.e:
>>>>>>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called
>>>>>>> a text
>>>>>>> segement.
>>>>>>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences
>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>> statements ?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
>>>>>> protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just pure
>>>>>> binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
>>>>>> understood them yet).
>>>>>
>>>>> No; text and data segments were the same in .COM files; "text
>>>>> segments" and "data segments" do not require a segmented memory model;
>>>>> "text segment" is computer science term with a specific meaning not
>>>>> requiring a segmented memory model.
>>>>>
>>>> The term "text segment" only has a meaning in the context of a memory
>>>> model. If the memory model has no segments there is no text segment.
>>>>
>>>> Leighs *specific* meaning of "text segment" seems to be another typical
>>>> example of his verbal diahorrea.
>>>>
>>>
>>> "Text segments" do not require a segmented memory model;

>>
>> Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then..
>>

>
> "In computing, a code segment, also known as a text segment or simply as
> text, is a phrase used to refer to a portion of memory or of an object
> file that contains executable instructions."
>
> -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_segment
>
> /Leigh


Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then..

 
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Paul
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      03-07-2011

"Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On 07/03/2011 16:32, Paul wrote:
>>
>> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> On 07/03/2011 13:47, Paul wrote:
>>>>
>>>> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>>> On 07/03/2011 01:41, Paul wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 23:40, K4 Monk wrote:
>>>>>>>> On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>>>>>>> news(E-Mail Removed) ...
>>>>>>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>>>>>>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Paul<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> when/if you
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> learn
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> asm.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> in a
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> while.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he
>>>>>>>>>>>>>> learns asm?
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the
>>>>>>>>>>>>> underlying
>>>>>>>>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better
>>>>>>>>>>>>> array
>>>>>>>>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't
>>>>>>>>>>>> keep
>>>>>>>>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member
>>>>>>>>>>>> of an
>>>>>>>>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only
>>>>>>>>>>>> exist
>>>>>>>>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is
>>>>>>>>>>>> simply a
>>>>>>>>>>>> region of storage.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non
>>>>>>>>>>> segmented
>>>>>>>>>>> memory model.
>>>>>>>>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they
>>>>>>>>>>> have no
>>>>>>>>>>> text segement.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
>>>>>>>>>>> programming
>>>>>>>>>>> world.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is
>>>>>>>>>> meant by
>>>>>>>>>> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem
>>>>>>>>>> with
>>>>>>>>>> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get
>>>>>>>>>> your
>>>>>>>>>> brain/mental state sorted out.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you
>>>>>>>>> have
>>>>>>>>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you
>>>>>>>>> seem to
>>>>>>>>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with
>>>>>>>>> memory
>>>>>>>>> models.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
>>>>>>>>> sentence ,
>>>>>>>>> i.e:
>>>>>>>>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe
>>>>>>>>> called
>>>>>>>>> a text
>>>>>>>>> segement.
>>>>>>>>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of
>>>>>>>>> sentences
>>>>>>>>> and
>>>>>>>>> statements ?
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
>>>>>>>> protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just
>>>>>>>> pure
>>>>>>>> binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
>>>>>>>> understood them yet).
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> No; text and data segments were the same in .COM files; "text
>>>>>>> segments" and "data segments" do not require a segmented memory
>>>>>>> model;
>>>>>>> "text segment" is computer science term with a specific meaning not
>>>>>>> requiring a segmented memory model.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>> The term "text segment" only has a meaning in the context of a memory
>>>>>> model. If the memory model has no segments there is no text segment.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Leighs *specific* meaning of "text segment" seems to be another
>>>>>> typical
>>>>>> example of his verbal diahorrea.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> "Text segments" do not require a segmented memory model;
>>>>
>>>> Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then..
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> "In computing, a code segment, also known as a text segment or simply
>>> as text, is a phrase used to refer to a portion of memory or of an
>>> object file that contains executable instructions."
>>>
>>> -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_segment
>>>
>>> /Leigh

>>
>> Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then..
>>

>
> "In computing, a code segment, also known as a text segment or simply as
> text, is a phrase used to refer to a portion of memory or of an object
> file that contains executable instructions."
>
> -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_segment
>
> /Leigh


Completely illogical , u reasonable , inintelligent arsehole ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

 
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hanukas
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      03-08-2011
On Mar 7, 6:32*pm, "Paul" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 07/03/2011 13:47, Paul wrote:

>
> >> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >>news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
> >>> On 07/03/2011 01:41, Paul wrote:

>
> >>>> "Leigh Johnston" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >>>>news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >>>>> On 06/03/2011 23:40, K4 Monk wrote:
> >>>>>> On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

>
> >>>>>>>news:4NWdnWfNoIF_Eu7QnZ2dnUVZ8hmdnZ2d@gigan ews.com...

>
> >>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:

>
> >>>>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >>>>>>>>>newsrSdnaYlxPLR6u7QnZ2dnUVZ8rqdnZ2d@gig anews.com...
> >>>>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:

>
> >>>>>>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen"<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >>>>>>>>>>>news:4d734116$0$2867$(E-Mail Removed). fi...
> >>>>>>>>>>>> Paul<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>>>>>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear
> >>>>>>>>>>>>> when/if you
> >>>>>>>>>>>>> learn
> >>>>>>>>>>>>> asm.

>
> >>>>>>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in
> >>>>>>>>>>>> a
> >>>>>>>>>>>> while.

>
> >>>>>>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he
> >>>>>>>>>>>> learns asm?

>
> >>>>>>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the
> >>>>>>>>>>> underlying
> >>>>>>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
> >>>>>>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.

>
> >>>>>>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't
> >>>>>>>>>> keep
> >>>>>>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.

>
> >>>>>>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of
> >>>>>>>>>> an
> >>>>>>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only
> >>>>>>>>>> exist
> >>>>>>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
> >>>>>>>>>> region of storage.

>
> >>>>>>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non
> >>>>>>>>> segmented
> >>>>>>>>> memory model.
> >>>>>>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they
> >>>>>>>>> have no
> >>>>>>>>> text segement.

>
> >>>>>>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
> >>>>>>>>> programming
> >>>>>>>>> world.

>
> >>>>>>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is
> >>>>>>>> meant by
> >>>>>>>> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem
> >>>>>>>> with
> >>>>>>>> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get
> >>>>>>>> your
> >>>>>>>> brain/mental state sorted out.

>
> >>>>>>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you
> >>>>>>> have
> >>>>>>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.

>
> >>>>>>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you
> >>>>>>> seem to
> >>>>>>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with
> >>>>>>> memory
> >>>>>>> models.

>
> >>>>>>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
> >>>>>>> sentence ,
> >>>>>>> i.e:
> >>>>>>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called
> >>>>>>> a text
> >>>>>>> segement.
> >>>>>>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences
> >>>>>>> and
> >>>>>>> statements ?

>
> >>>>>> Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
> >>>>>> protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just pure
> >>>>>> binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
> >>>>>> understood them yet).

>
> >>>>> No; text and data segments were the same in .COM files; "text
> >>>>> segments" and "data segments" do not require a segmented memory model;
> >>>>> "text segment" is computer science term with a specific meaning not
> >>>>> requiring a segmented memory model.

>
> >>>> The term "text segment" only has a meaning in the context of a memory
> >>>> model. If the memory model has no segments there is no text segment.

>
> >>>> Leighs *specific* meaning of "text segment" seems to be another typical
> >>>> example of his verbal diahorrea.

>
> >>> "Text segments" do not require a segmented memory model;

>
> >> Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then..

>
> > "In computing, a code segment, also known as a text segment or simply as
> > text, is a phrase used to refer to a portion of memory or of an object
> > file that contains executable instructions."

>
> > --http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_segment

>
> > /Leigh

>
> Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then..


It's still a text segment, does't matter if it's mapped through
descriptor, page or something else. The name is an artifact from times
long bygone, we're stuck with it.
 
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