Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Programming > C++ > analysis of floating point values

Reply
Thread Tools

analysis of floating point values

 
 
Juha Nieminen
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-20-2011
None of the presented solutions take into account endianess. Usually when
you want to print the binary representation of something, you want the
most significant bit to be printed first and go down from there (in other
words, you just want the base-2 representation of the value in the same
way you would print a regular base-10 one).

Also, since it's trivial in C++ to make the function work with any type,
not just doubles, why not do that while we are at it?

//---------------------------------------------------------------
#include <iostream>
#include <climits>

template<typename Type>
void printBinaryRepresentation(Type value)
{
// Resolve if this is a big-endian or a little-endian system:
int dummy = 1;
bool littleEndian = (*reinterpret_cast<char*>(&dummy) == 1);

// The trick is to create a char pointer to the value:
const unsigned char* bytePtr =
reinterpret_cast<const unsigned char*>(&value);

// Loop over the bytes in the floating point value:
for(unsigned i = 0; i < sizeof(Type); ++i)
{
unsigned char byte;
if(littleEndian) // we have to traverse the value backwards:
byte = bytePtr[sizeof(Type) - i - 1];
else // we have to traverse it forwards:
byte = bytePtr[i];

// Print the bits in the byte:
for(int bitIndex = CHAR_BIT-1; bitIndex >= 0; --bitIndex)
std::cout << ((byte >> bitIndex) & 1);
}

std::cout << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
printBinaryRepresentation(0.5);
printBinaryRepresentation(-0.5f);
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Juha Nieminen
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-20-2011
Leigh Johnston <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On 20/02/2011 15:19, Juha Nieminen wrote:
>> Leigh Johnston<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> int main()
>>> {
>>> double f = 42.42;
>>> unsigned char* bits = reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>(&f);
>>> for (std::size_t i = 0; i != sizeof(f); ++i)
>>> {
>>> unsigned char byte = bits[i];
>>> for (std::size_t j = CHAR_BIT; j != 0; --j)
>>> std::cout<< (byte>> (j-1)& 1 ? '1' : '0');
>>> }
>>> }

>>
>> error: 'size_t' is not a member of 'std'

>
> What are you gibbering about? #includes are usually implied in a code
> snippet. std::size_t exists.


And someone learning C++ is supposed to know that how?

It would have costed only a couple of additional lines to post a complete
program.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
gwowen
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-20-2011
On Feb 20, 3:30*pm, Juha Nieminen <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> * None of the presented solutions take into account endianess.


The problem with that is that you assume every machine's endianess/
byte-order can be described completely by looking at the lowest-
addressed-byte of the representation of unsigned(1). This can be
wrong on an ARM, and is always wrong on a PDP-11. It also assumes that
the endianess of a float point type is the same as an integer type.
This is untrue on a smattering of crazier-than-a-bag-of-weasel
architectures http://www.quadibloc.com/comp/cp0201.htm

> Usually when you want to print the binary representation of something, you want the most significant bit to be printed first and go down from there


But sometimes you're printing the representation of something
precisely to poke around at the innards of the processor, to determine
byte-ordering, mantissa format, etc, and you really want the "bytes
ordered-as-they-are-arranged-in-memory". And of course, sometimes you
want to print the representation of something that is not a value type.
 
Reply With Quote
 
K4 Monk
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-22-2011
On Feb 20, 8:30*pm, Juha Nieminen <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> * * bool littleEndian = (*reinterpret_cast<char*>(&dummy) == 1);


took me a minute to understand this but now that I do, its very
clever! I got confused because dummy is an int of value 1, and in the
line above I wasn't sure if 1 was a bool or an int.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Joshua Maurice
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-22-2011
On Feb 18, 6:56*am, (E-Mail Removed) (Jens Thoms Toerring) wrote:
> K4 Monk <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > On Feb 18, 7:26*pm, (E-Mail Removed) (Jens Thoms Toerring) wrote:
> > > In e.g.

>
> > > > > unsigned char* bits = reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>(&f);

>
> > > there's a cast from 'double *' (note the '&' in front of 'f')
> > > to 'unsigned char *', so the sizeof a double is irrelevant
> > > here.

> > On Feb 18, 7:28 pm, Leigh Johnston <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > > On 18/02/2011 14:15, K4 Monk wrote:
> > > The cast is of a *pointer to* the double rather than of the *value of*
> > > the double; an unsigned char pointer is the same size as a double pointer.

> > Ok I understand now. Thanks. So its basically because pointers are
> > always the same size regardless of whether they point to a double or a
> > char

>
> Mostly correct. I'm not sure about the C++ standard, but the
> C standard only guarantees that the size of a char or void
> pointer is sufficient to allow a cast from other object types
> to them (the back-cast is then also possible). That means that
> there's a theoretical possibility that pointers to objects of
> other types have smaller sizes. But I haven't seen any such
> machine yet and it also rather likely doesn't make much sense
> to cast from a char pointer to some other pointer (as long as
> it's not a back-cast to the original type).
>
> Be a bit careful with pointers to functions, they aren't in-
> cluded in this (a function isn't an object). But even there
> on most machines it also works.


Pretty sure that's the same in C++.

However, due to forward declarations, an implementation would likely
have to go out of its way to have different pointer to struct types
which have different sizes or representations. This is true of C and C+
+.

Also, IIRC, some crazy mainframes do have void* and char* of a
different size than int*. The reason is that the machine is at the
hardware level only 64 bit addressable, and they didn't want to have
CHAR_BITS or whatever be 64. Instead, char has 8 bits, and a "simple"
char read or write is implemented through a hardware assembly load or
store with additional implicit bit manipulation to only change the
right 8 bits. (Needless to say, such a system wouldn't be POSIX
pthread conforming nor C++0x conforming.)
 
Reply With Quote
 
James Kanze
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-23-2011
On Feb 22, 10:53 pm, Joshua Maurice <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Feb 18, 6:56 am, (E-Mail Removed) (Jens Thoms Toerring) wrote:


> Also, IIRC, some crazy mainframes do have void* and char* of a
> different size than int*.


Not so much on mainframes, as on smaller, embedded machines. On
where not much text handling is to be expected, using word
addressing makes sense even today, at least if words are small.
If you're not using all of the bits for addressing, then you
might as well spend the extra bits to address bytes. On a 16
bit machine, however, word addressing means you can address
128KB, rather than just 64KB.

What did happen in the past (and may still be the case on some
exotic mainframes) is that the basic address was originally word
addressing, but that some of the unused upper bits were later
dedicated to the byte address in a word. In such cases, a char*
wouldn't be bigger than an int*, but it would have a different
representation, and casting a char* to an int* could force the
byte address part to zero. (It also lead to the interesting
characteristic that (unsigned)p > (unsigned)(p+1) in some cases.)

--
James Kanze
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Share-Point-2010 ,Share-Point -2010 Training , Share-point-2010Hyderabad , Share-point-2010 Institute Saraswati lakki ASP .Net 0 01-06-2012 06:39 AM
floating point problem... floating indeed :( teeshift Ruby 2 12-01-2006 01:16 AM
converting floating point to fixed point H aka N VHDL 15 03-02-2006 02:26 PM
floating point to fixed point conversion riya1012@gmail.com C Programming 4 02-22-2006 05:56 PM
Fixed-point format for floating-point numbers Motaz Saad Java 7 11-05-2005 05:33 PM



Advertisments