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Re: essential books on C++

 
 
P. Areias
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      01-31-2011

> I'd also add "Elements of programming" by Stepanov & Mc Jones


Having followed, years ago, the recommendations of the knowledgeable,
I've purchased a number of books including "Deitel's C++ How to
Program". Between the "Accelerated" and "Essential C++" (I bought
both), I found the latter superior for the novice. It has many typos
and the typesetting is far from perfect, but it captures the spirit
better than "Accelerated" which has intrusive reference-counted smart
pointers in the latest chapters and it is somehow a little more
pretentious.

I carefully read (at a public Library) C++ Primer 4th Edition. I
honestly think it is not (much) better than what you can find online
(e.g. Thinking in C++), and did not find motivation to buy it.
Deitel's "How to program" is really not worth buying because it annoys
the reader with the verbosity. I can send you mine, if you want (it's
the 6th Edition). I also bought "Elements of programming" and it is
beautifully done, but more "algorithmic" than really a C++ book (the C+
+ appendix is worth reading).

Online references can be "OK" to start such as cplusplus.com and C+
+FAQ is invaluable (more complete than Meyers book- which I also
bought). And Microsoft's C++ documentation is really complete and well
organized - at least in my perspective.

In summary, I would honestly suggest you to buy Essential C++ and this
latest Stroustrup's book, which looks clear and simple enough (never
read it though - just the table of contents). The rest you can find
online. Don't throw money away as I did...

P. Areias


> The reference, for good reasons.
>
> I'd also add "Elements of programming" by Stepanov & Mc Jones.
> While not focusing on specific details of programming in C++, it
> truly embodies what is best in the "spirit" of C++ programming imnsho.
>
> Best Regards
>
> Bernard
>
> --
> [ Seehttp://www.gotw.ca/resources/clcm.htmfor info about ]
> [ comp.lang.c++.moderated. First time posters: Do this! ]



--
[ See http://www.gotw.ca/resources/clcm.htm for info about ]
[ comp.lang.c++.moderated. First time posters: Do this! ]

 
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Jorgen Grahn
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      02-02-2011
On Tue, 2011-02-01, ptyxs wrote:
>
> And please note : by "this latest Stroustrup book", what is meant
> is : ''Programming Principles and Parameters Using C++''


It's called "Programming -- Principles and /Practice/ Using C++".

/Jorgen

--
// Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
\X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
 
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ptyxs
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      02-02-2011
On Feb 2, 12:45*pm, Jorgen Grahn <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Tue, 2011-02-01, ptyxs wrote:
>
> > And please note *: by "this latest Stroustrup book", what is meant
> > is : ''Programming Principles and Parameters Using C++''

>
> It's called "Programming -- Principles and /Practice/ Using C++".
>
> /Jorgen
>
> --
> * // Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ *Oo *o. * . *.
> \X/ * * snipabacken.se> * O *o * .


Sorry for the typo...
 
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K4 Monk
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      02-15-2011
thanks everyone. I see three titles mentioned in this thread quite
frequently.

"Accelerated C++"
"Effective C++ and More Effective C++"
"The C++ Programming Language"

I don't have Accelerated C++ but the other books get read quite often.
I also find myself forgetting everything I've read though. Scott
Meyer's approach is very surgical, I wish he came up with an
introductory book along the lines of Essential C++ (Lippman).

Another book recommended by someone else at my job is "Inside the C++
Object Model" by Stanley Lippman. I've browsed through it but get the
feeling that it might be outdated.

What other books do you feel might be good for soaking up C++ slowly?
 
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Default User
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      02-15-2011
"K4 Monk" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...

> What other books do you feel might be good for soaking up C++ slowly?


The C++ Standard Library, by Josuttis, is very good.



Brian
--
Day 740 of the "no grouchy usenet posts" project
Current music playing: None.



 
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ptyxs
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      02-16-2011
On Feb 15, 11:49*pm, "Default User" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
The C++ Programming Langage by Bjarne Stroustrup is a very difficult
book, certainly not to be recommanded for beginners.
Moreover, Bjarne Stroustrup is writing a new version of this book
which will take into account the new C++0x modifications of the norm.
Better wait for this new version...
For beginners the best book is by far :

Programming : Principles and Practise Using C++ by Bjerne Stroustrup.

As it is a rather recent books and made for beginners many C++
professional programmers did not read it. That is probably the reason
why it is so rarely mentionned in this thread.

To get an idea of its content look at the official Bjarne's book site
here :
http://www.stroustrup.com/Programming/
 
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K4 Monk
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      02-16-2011
On Feb 16, 2:40*pm, ptyxs <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Feb 15, 11:49*pm, "Default User" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> The C++ Programming Langage by Bjarne Stroustrup is a very difficult
> book, certainly not to be recommanded for beginners.


Yes I agree! I have had this book around me for over 5 years now and
still when I take a peek inside something tells me to wait and read it
again afterwards.

Maybe C++ isn't the right language for me. By comparison I learnt C in
about a week by simply reading "The C Programming Language" and feel
somewhat confident that if I read C code (from what I've seen of open
source projects) I can understand what is going on. With C++ code, its
always as if I need a few hours of warming up

> Moreover, Bjarne Stroustrup is writing a new version of this book
> which will take into account the new C++0x modifications of the norm.
> Better wait for this new version...
> For beginners the best book is by far :
>
> Programming : Principles and Practise Using C++ by Bjerne Stroustrup.
>
> As it is a rather recent books and made for beginners many C++
> professional programmers did not read it. That is probably the reason
> why it is so rarely mentionned in this thread.
>
> To get an idea of its content look at the official *Bjarne's book site
> here :http://www.stroustrup.com/Programming/


Thanks for the info, looks very useful. I'll order it
 
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