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What OS did Iran use? Stuxnet malware

 
 
Lusotec
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2010
RayLopez99 wrote:
> “It is extremely difficult to clean up installations from Stuxnet,"


Reboot computer, insert GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive, install.
Extremely difficult? Not!

Regards.

 
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Edward A. Falk
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      12-22-2010
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
RayLopez99 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>If they used Windows with the latest patches from Norton, arguably
>this would never have happened. But thank Allah for Linux and "virus
>free computing", LOL!


My understanding is that Stuxnet is a Windows-specific virus. Where
does Linux enter into it?

--
-Ed Falk, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
http://thespamdiaries.blogspot.com/
 
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RayLopez99
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2010
On Dec 22, 10:44*pm, (E-Mail Removed) (Edward A. Falk) wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>
> RayLopez99 *<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >If they used Windows with the latest patches from Norton, arguably
> >this would never have happened. *But thank Allah for Linux and "virus
> >free computing", *LOL!

>
> My understanding is that Stuxnet is a Windows-specific virus. *Where
> does Linux enter into it?
>


Yes, you are correct. Linux does not enter into it. But had the
Israelis wanted to penetrate Linux, they could have. After all this
virus was one of the most sophisticated ever, see below. And it
spread via a classic "zero-day"attack.

RL


This kind of service can extend the life of outdated malware, or
extend the time new threats stay
undetected. However, the use of such technologies to resist detection
by antivirus software can be used
as a heuristic for the detection of previously unknown samples. But
the converse case also holds true:
avoiding using any techniques aimed at bypassing antivirus software
and making the program resemble
legitimate software more closely can be a way of protecting malware.
This is the case with the attack
mechanism used by the Stuxnet worm

The Stuxnet attack constituted a serious threat to trust in software
using legal digital signatures. This
creates a problem for white-listing, where security software is based
on the a priori assumption that a
trusted program meets certain conditions and is therefore indeed
trustworthy. And what if the program
closely resembles legitimate software and even has digital
certificates for installed modules published in
the name of reputable companies? All this suggests that targeted
attacks could persist much longer over
time than we previously imagined. Stuxnet was able to stay undetected
for a substantial period where
no one saw anything suspicious. The use of a self-launching, 0-day
vulnerability in the attack allowed the
rapid distribution of Stuxnet in the targeted region. The choice of
this kind of vulnerability is quite
deliberate, because in the absence of information about its existence,
use of the exploit will not be
detected. All these facts suggest a well-planned attack which remained
unnoticed until long after it was
launched. But it is precisely the existence of such threats that
inspires us to look at the new vector and
the possibility of attacks that use it, in order to reduce the impact
of future attacks.
 
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Norman Peelman
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-22-2010
RayLopez99 wrote:
> On Dec 22, 10:44 pm, (E-Mail Removed) (Edward A. Falk) wrote:
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>>
>> RayLopez99 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> If they used Windows with the latest patches from Norton, arguably
>>> this would never have happened. But thank Allah for Linux and "virus
>>> free computing", LOL!

>> My understanding is that Stuxnet is a Windows-specific virus. Where
>> does Linux enter into it?
>>

>
> Yes, you are correct. Linux does not enter into it. But had the
> Israelis wanted to penetrate Linux, they could have. After all this
> virus was one of the most sophisticated ever, see below. And it
> spread via a classic "zero-day"attack.
>
> RL
>
>
> This kind of service can extend the life of outdated malware, or
> extend the time new threats stay
> undetected. However, the use of such technologies to resist detection
> by antivirus software can be used
> as a heuristic for the detection of previously unknown samples. But
> the converse case also holds true:
> avoiding using any techniques aimed at bypassing antivirus software
> and making the program resemble
> legitimate software more closely can be a way of protecting malware.
> This is the case with the attack
> mechanism used by the Stuxnet worm
>
> The Stuxnet attack constituted a serious threat to trust in software
> using legal digital signatures. This
> creates a problem for white-listing, where security software is based
> on the a priori assumption that a
> trusted program meets certain conditions and is therefore indeed
> trustworthy. And what if the program
> closely resembles legitimate software and even has digital
> certificates for installed modules published in
> the name of reputable companies? All this suggests that targeted
> attacks could persist much longer over
> time than we previously imagined. Stuxnet was able to stay undetected
> for a substantial period where
> no one saw anything suspicious. The use of a self-launching, 0-day
> vulnerability in the attack allowed the
> rapid distribution of Stuxnet in the targeted region. The choice of
> this kind of vulnerability is quite
> deliberate, because in the absence of information about its existence,
> use of the exploit will not be
> detected. All these facts suggest a well-planned attack which remained
> unnoticed until long after it was
> launched. But it is precisely the existence of such threats that
> inspires us to look at the new vector and
> the possibility of attacks that use it, in order to reduce the impact
> of future attacks.


Seeing as the virus/malware was installed via legitimate methods, ie:
it was trusted, I don't see how any OS comes into play here.

Another worthless shot at Linux by RayLopez99, noted...

--
Norman
Registered Linux user #461062
AMD64X2 6400+ Ubuntu 8.04 64bit
 
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Peter Foldes
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      12-23-2010
"LunchBox" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Wed, 22 Dec 2010 13:41:44 -0500, Peter Foldes wrote:



Hey BD

Another name you pulled out of the hat?? LunchBox ? Sounds like you are hungry

--
Peter
Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
http://www.microsoft.com/protect


 
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Clogwog
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-23-2010
"Lusotec" <(E-Mail Removed)> schreef in bericht
news:ietn8g$t1g$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org...
> RayLopez99 wrote:
>> “It is extremely difficult to clean up installations from Stuxnet,"

>
> Reboot computer, insert GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive, install.
> Extremely difficult? Not!
>
> Regards.
>


Please tell the Iranian Ayatollah's how they might remove Stuxnet with a
GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive?, fsckwit!
All that leaving them with a completely functional Atomic Energy plant and
without a set back in Iran’s nuclear program.
They might grant you 34 beautiful brides in heaven for that, maybe the Nobel
prize as well.

 
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JEDIDIAH
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-23-2010
On 2010-12-23, Clogwog <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> "Lusotec" <(E-Mail Removed)> schreef in bericht
> news:ietn8g$t1g$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org...
>> RayLopez99 wrote:
>>> “It is extremely difficult to clean up installations from Stuxnet,"

>>
>> Reboot computer, insert GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive, install.
>> Extremely difficult? Not!
>>
>> Regards.
>>

>
> Please tell the Iranian Ayatollah's how they might remove Stuxnet with a
> GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive?, fsckwit!


One seriously wonders why they didn't just use a proper OS like QNX for
this sort of thing to begin with...

WinDOS is a TOY that has no business in a nuclear facility.

--

Nevermind the pirates. Sony needs to worry about it's own back catalog. |||
/ | \
 
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Clogwog
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-23-2010
"JEDIDIAH" <(E-Mail Removed)> schreef in bericht
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On 2010-12-23, Clogwog <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> "Lusotec" <(E-Mail Removed)> schreef in bericht
>> news:ietn8g$t1g$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org...
>>> RayLopez99 wrote:
>>>> “It is extremely difficult to clean up installations from Stuxnet,"
>>>
>>> Reboot computer, insert GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive, install.
>>> Extremely difficult? Not!
>>>
>>> Regards.
>>>

>>
>> Please tell the Iranian Ayatollah's how they might remove Stuxnet with a
>> GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive?, fsckwit!

>
> One seriously wonders why they didn't just use a proper OS like QNX for
> this sort of thing to begin with...
>
> WinDOS is a TOY that has no business in a nuclear facility.
>
> --
>
> Nevermind the pirates. Sony needs to worry about it's own back catalog.
> |||
> / | \



Stupid Jed at it again, LMFAO!!
Siemens, who delivered the software to Iran, does not use Unix, Linux,
whatever!

 
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The Natural Philosopher
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-23-2010
JEDIDIAH wrote:
> On 2010-12-23, Clogwog <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> "Lusotec" <(E-Mail Removed)> schreef in bericht
>> news:ietn8g$t1g$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org...
>>> RayLopez99 wrote:
>>>> “It is extremely difficult to clean up installations from Stuxnet,"
>>> Reboot computer, insert GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive, install.
>>> Extremely difficult? Not!
>>>
>>> Regards.
>>>

>> Please tell the Iranian Ayatollah's how they might remove Stuxnet with a
>> GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive?, fsckwit!

>
> One seriously wonders why they didn't just use a proper OS like QNX for
> this sort of thing to begin with...
>
> WinDOS is a TOY that has no business in a nuclear facility.
>

Or anywhere, but if its all you know...
 
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JEDIDIAH
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-23-2010
On 2010-12-23, Clogwog <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> "JEDIDIAH" <(E-Mail Removed)> schreef in bericht
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> On 2010-12-23, Clogwog <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> "Lusotec" <(E-Mail Removed)> schreef in bericht
>>> news:ietn8g$t1g$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org...
>>>> RayLopez99 wrote:
>>>>> “It is extremely difficult to clean up installations from Stuxnet,"
>>>>
>>>> Reboot computer, insert GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive, install.
>>>> Extremely difficult? Not!
>>>>
>>>> Regards.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Please tell the Iranian Ayatollah's how they might remove Stuxnet with a
>>> GNU/Linux install CD or USB drive?, fsckwit!

>>
>> One seriously wonders why they didn't just use a proper OS like QNX for
>> this sort of thing to begin with...
>>
>> WinDOS is a TOY that has no business in a nuclear facility.
>>
>> --
>>
>> Nevermind the pirates. Sony needs to worry about it's own back catalog.
>> |||
>> / | \

>
>
> Stupid Jed at it again, LMFAO!!
> Siemens, who delivered the software to Iran, does not use Unix, Linux,
> whatever!
>


I said QNX you ignorant "mere consumer".

--
Apple: Because only pirates are power users. |||
/ | \
 
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