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Re: O'Reilly Python Certification

 
 
Steve Holden
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-16-2010
Each lesson required you to complete a practical assignment. You submit
these assignments for evaluation, and do not proceed to the next lesson
until your assignment reaches a satisfactory standard. Thus, less
experienced students will tend to have more interaction with their tutors.

A class will typically have between twelve and sixteen lessons. There
are also quizzes and a final practical project.

regards
Steve

On 12/16/2010 12:12 PM, Matty Sarro wrote:
> So how exactly does the class work? Is it like an elementary CS class
> where you have a teacher, assignments, etc. Or is it more like a
> guided tour through the O'Reilly Python book/cookbook?
>
> On Thu, Dec 16, 2010 at 10:40 AM, Ethan Furman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Please don't top-post.
>>
>> Nitin Pawar wrote:
>>>
>>> Can someone provide any links or any starting points on how to apply and
>>> what are the prerequisites

>>
>> http://www.oreillyschool.com/certifi...rogramming.php
>>
>> No prerequisites that I could see, and currently they are running a 25%
>> discount promotional.
>>
>> ~Ethan~
>> --
>> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
>>



--
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PyCon 2011 Atlanta March 9-17 http://us.pycon.org/
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Holden Web LLC http://www.holdenweb.com/

 
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J. Altman
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-28-2010
On 2010-12-16, Steve Holden <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Each lesson required you to complete a practical assignment. You submit
> these assignments for evaluation, and do not proceed to the next lesson
> until your assignment reaches a satisfactory standard. Thus, less
> experienced students will tend to have more interaction with their tutors.
>
> A class will typically have between twelve and sixteen lessons. There
> are also quizzes and a final practical project.
>
> regards
> Steve


I have a general question.

Does it seem odd that a certificate in Python, an Open Source
language; taught at O'Reilly, which offers an Open Source Programming
Certificate and is something like waist-deep in Open Source
publishing; is offered to the world at large but only (IIUC) if one
runs some version of Windows by MS?

Based on what I am given to understand from my correspondence with
OST, it seems that I *must* install an instance of Windows to take the
certificate's courses.

Not that I particularly want to bash MS, but I am running FreeBSD, and
have Python 2.x and 3.x installed; I can call either IDE; and I am
competent at the shell, I think sufficiently, to manage coding at the
shell.

Is it normal for people in CS courses at the University and/or
certificate level to learn a given language under Windows?

Or is it just me who thinks it odd that an OS like FreeBSD won't
(apparently, I stress) work with the O'Reilly Sandbox?
 
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Stephen Bunn
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-29-2010
At Tue, 28 Dec 2010 20:07:29 +0000 (UTC),
J. Altman wrote:
>
> I have a general question.
>
> Does it seem odd that a certificate in Python, an Open Source
> language; taught at O'Reilly, which offers an Open Source Programming
> Certificate and is something like waist-deep in Open Source
> publishing; is offered to the world at large but only (IIUC) if one
> runs some version of Windows by MS?
>
> Based on what I am given to understand from my correspondence with
> OST, it seems that I *must* install an instance of Windows to take the
> certificate's courses.

This is not true. You can take the course on any operating system that supports a RDP client. I am enrolled with in the python course and I use GNU/Linux. They even have instructions on their website on how to configure it. I would have preferred them to use a UNIX shell. I'm still waiting for somebody to come up with a course that teaches me a programming language, while teaching me a VCS and allows me to write code and submit to a repo with other students contributing. You want to bring people into F/OSS -- That is how you do it!

The complaint that I do have with OST (at least the Python course) and the reason I have not completed (or even worked on the course in almost a year) it, is that its just plain boring. It's almost 2011! Give me some interactive flash, a video, something. Reading some pages of dry text just doesn't cut it for me. I can do that on my own. If I'm going to pay for a course I want a teacher that is going to teach me something. I can buy plenty of books and read them. The entire course is just plain dry text. I don't even remeber seeing an image diagram. On top of that the text is horribly ugly to look at.
 
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Stephen Bunn
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-29-2010
At Tue, 28 Dec 2010 20:07:29 +0000 (UTC),
J. Altman wrote:
>
> I have a general question.
>
> Does it seem odd that a certificate in Python, an Open Source
> language; taught at O'Reilly, which offers an Open Source Programming
> Certificate and is something like waist-deep in Open Source
> publishing; is offered to the world at large but only (IIUC) if one
> runs some version of Windows by MS?
>
> Based on what I am given to understand from my correspondence with
> OST, it seems that I *must* install an instance of Windows to take the
> certificate's courses.

This is not true. You can take the course on any operating system that supports a RDP client. I am enrolled with in the python course and I use GNU/Linux. They even have instructions on their website on how to configure it. I would have preferred them to use a UNIX shell. I'm still waiting for somebody to come up with a course that teaches me a programming language, while teaching me a VCS and allows me to write code and submit to a repo with other students contributing. You want to bring people into F/OSS -- That is how you do it!

The complaint that I do have with OST (at least the Python course) and the reason I have not completed (or even worked on the course in almost a year) it, is that its just plain boring. It's almost 2011! Give me some interactive flash, a video, something. Reading some pages of dry text just doesn't cut it for me. I can do that on my own. If I'm going to pay for a course I want a teacher that is going to teach me something. I can buy plenty of books and read them. The entire course is just plain dry text. I don't even remeber seeing an image diagram. On top of that the text is horribly ugly to look at.
 
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Stephen Bunn
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-29-2010
At Tue, 28 Dec 2010 20:07:29 +0000 (UTC),
J. Altman wrote:
>
> I have a general question.
>
> Does it seem odd that a certificate in Python, an Open Source
> language; taught at O'Reilly, which offers an Open Source Programming
> Certificate and is something like waist-deep in Open Source
> publishing; is offered to the world at large but only (IIUC) if one
> runs some version of Windows by MS?
>
> Based on what I am given to understand from my correspondence with
> OST, it seems that I *must* install an instance of Windows to take the
> certificate's courses.

This is not true. You can take the course on any operating system that supports a RDP client. I am enrolled with in the python course and I use GNU/Linux. They even have instructions on their website on how to configure it. I would have preferred them to use a UNIX shell. I'm still waiting for somebody to come up with a course that teaches me a programming language, while teaching me a VCS and allows me to write code and submit to a repo with other students contributing. You want to bring people into F/OSS -- That is how you do it!

The complaint that I do have with OST (at least the Python course) and the reason I have not completed (or even worked on the course in almost a year) it, is that its just plain boring. It's almost 2011! Give me some interactive flash, a video, something. Reading some pages of dry text just doesn't cut it for me. I can do that on my own. If I'm going to pay for a course I want a teacher that is going to teach me something. I can buy plenty of books and read them. The entire course is just plain dry text. I don't even remeber seeing an image diagram. On top of that the text is horribly ugly to look at.
 
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