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Re: UK - running a braodband extension CAT5,5e,6

 
 
PeeCee
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      11-08-2010
"Information" wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...

Ok , in the dining room is BT broadband router

Id like to have a "faceplate" in same room , and use a
patch network cable that leads from back of router to faceplate

The faceplate has network cable that goes to loft

In loft the cable goes to junction box , the junction box

splits to send cable to
livingroon
two bedrooms
garage

and essentially a faceplate is there ready for cables
to computers etc

what i dont understand i the differences in cable and which is
is compatible with broadband etc

and why is some talkingablut twisted pairs etc ... im lost

please explain for me !

--
----------------
No links here , nup




Your 'Broadband' speed is entirely dependant on :
a) the service provided by your ISP.
b) the cables delivering that service into your residence.
c) the broadband modem that is connected to that incoming ISP cable.

ie everything from the middle of your ADSL modem to the telephone exchange.
'Nothing' to do with Cat5/5E or Cat6 cables.

Cat5/5E or Cat6 are cables used on Local Area Networks, i.e. the 'output'
side of your ADSL (or Cable) modem.
Cat5/Cat5E is designed for 100Mbit LAN's and Cat6 for 1Gbit (1000Mbit) LANs
Ethernet (Cat5/5E/6) cables are often called 'twisted pair' because the 8
wires inside are configured as 4 pairs of wires, each pair being 'twisted'
about one another to minimise interference.
(The number of wires, twists and other parameters of CAT5/5E/6 are better
explained on this Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable )

"All" of the Cat5/5E/6 cables are compatible with 'Broadband' as their only
involvement with 'Broadband' is the transfer of data from your 'Broadband
Modem' to the PC's connected to your LAN.
Given that the average 'Broadband' connection is only in single figure
Mbits/sec (2-8 Mbit/sec) over the 'Broadband' connection, delivering that
amount of data over a 100 or 1000Mbit LAN is a doddle.

If you have to buy drop cable to go from the wall plates to your equipment
then logic would say get Cat6 simply for forwards compatibility when you
upgrade your LAN to 1Gb componets.
OTOH if you buy 5/5E it's probably going to match what is already there and
not have any affect on your 'Broadband' speed.

Note when transfering data PC to PC on the other hand the faster your LAN
the better because the equipment is capable of maxing out the capacity.

Best
Paul.





 
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PeeCee
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      11-09-2010
"Information" wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...

> Ethernet (Cat5/5E/6) cables are often called 'twisted pair' because the 8
> wires inside are configured as 4 pairs of wires, each pair being 'twisted'
> about one another to minimise interference.
> (The number of wires, twists and other parameters of CAT5/5E/6 are better
> explained on this Wikipedia
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable )



thnaks for your informative reply

could you clarify for me please , do all of CAT5/5E/6 have
8 wires , so 5 and 6 actually refer to number of wires

this is one of th rwason iw as concerned in case i bought
wrong faceplate with wrong number of connections ?



<quote>
could you clarify for me please , do all of CAT5/5E/6 have
8 wires , so 5 and 6 actually refer to number of wires
</quote>

"ALL" CAT 3, 5, 5E and 6 cables have 8 conductors.
Unless specially made or ordered all the cables you buy at PC World etc will
have '8' conductors in them.

The prefix "CAT" stands for "Category" as in Class or Group.
So a CAT5 cable is a cable that has the characteristics that put it in the
'5th' Category of defined 'Ethernet' cables.
The number of the 'CAT' has nothing to do with the number of wires, but
everything to do with the physical and electrical performance of the cable
in Ethernet service.

In general terms the 'Categories' are:
CAT 1 cable never existed.
CAT 2 cable never existed
CAT 3 cable is capable of transmitting data up to 16MHZ via two of the four
pairs
CAT 4 never existed but loosely defined means using all 4 pairs of CAT 3
cables to give boosted speed.
CAT 5 is rated to 100MHZ using two of the four pairs
CAT 5E has supposedly 'enhanced' electrical characteristics to make it a
'better' performing version of CAT5 (still using two of four pairs)
CAT 6 is rated to 250MHZ using all four pairs of conductors.


The 8 wires are 'paired' as follows.
Orange/Orange-white
Green/Green-white
Blue/Blue-white
Brown/Brown-white.
Again I would refer you to this Wikipedia page
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable for a fuller definition of the
colours and pinout connections.
(look at the pictures down the right side)


<quote>
this is one of th rwason iw as concerned in case i bought
wrong faceplate with wrong number of connections ?
</quote>

Again as per the Cables just buy standard "Ethernet" wall plates with "8"
connectors.
eg http://www.cablestogo.com/product.as...2223&sku=27414
Any thing else is not designed for Ethernet service and will not accept
standard Ethernet cable plugs any way.
The plugs are commonly called RJ45's by the way, though the correct term is
8P8C as discussed in this Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RJ45
The most common confusables are RJ11, RJ14 etc which while they look
similar are in fact smaller having a max number of 6 wires.
See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RJ11,_RJ14,_RJ25#RJ11 for the full RJ
story.

If you are looking at the number of connectors as a way to 'do it on the
cheap' forget it.
CAT 5 cable, plugs & sockets are so ubiquitious (common) that it is cheaper
to use CAT5 cable for a wide range of jobs than the supposedly 'correct'
cable.
Classic example is new telephone wiring inside building is almost
exclusively done using CAT 5 these days because it is cheaper than standard
phone cable and can be used for either service by using an adaptor on non
Ethernet tasks.

I also gather from rereading your OP that none of this wiring in your home
exists at present.
May I point out that
<quote>
In loft the cable goes to junction box, the junction box splits to send
cable to living roon two bedrooms garage.
</quote
will require a "Network Switch" to 'Split' the one inwards cable to the
"livingroon, two bedrooms and garage"
(something like this
http://www.pcworld.co.uk/gbuk/netgea...39729-pdt.html)
You can't just join all the wires to each outlet.

Best
Paul.

 
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Anyone
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      11-14-2010
On Mon, 08 Nov 2010 11:44:51 +0000, Information wrote:

[just catching up on news...]

> could you clarify for me please , do all of CAT5/5E/6 have 8 wires


Yes.

> 5 and 6 actually refer to number of wires


No. "Cat-5 UTP" == Category 5 Unshielded Twisted Pair wire.

"Category" refers to the quality of the UTP cable, and its ability to
support Ethernet-compliant signalling over a distance of 100m (328 ft)
both with, and without intervening punch-down blocks, "bridge taps" and
other line impairment. "Unshielded" means no grounded co-ax-like braid
in the line, and thus some amount of EMI/RFI in normal operation.
"Twisted" refers to the fact that wire pairs are wrapped around each
other in the same bundle. A specific value or guaranteed number of
twists per inch helps preserve uniform line impedance. The more uniform
the line impedance, the higher the supportable signalling rate for a
target line "reach". While Cat-5,6,6e have four twisted pairs, there are
also 25-pair bundles. Generally, UTP has lower manufacturing cost than
co-axial cable, but is (at least -was-) also more widely installed than
any other kind of communication medium in this country. UTP has
relatively poor control over line impedance per unit length, hence a need
for different categories that could support different market segments.

The target minimum line "reach" for fully-compliant Ethernet is 100m.
"Cat-3" was originally qualified for 10Mb signalling known as 10Base-T.
"Cat-5" has improved control over the number of twists per inch (and
other physical characteristics) and will support 100Mb signalling known
as 100Base-T. "Cat-6" has more improvements and will support 1Gb
signalling known as 1000Base-T. The "e" in "cat-6e" means "extended
reach". All of that means you should purchase and install Cat-3/5/6 if
you want to ensure that your network will be fully compliant with
10/100/1000Base-T. On the other hand, if you know that your little home
network (say) will never need to reach any machine over more than a half-
dozen meters, and only support a few machines at one time, then Cat-5
likely will work fine with 1000Base-T.

> this is one of th rwason iw as concerned in case i bought wrong
> faceplate with wrong number of connections ?


 
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Anyone
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2010
A correction or two...

On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 08:06:45 +0000, I wrote:

> On Mon, 08 Nov 2010 11:44:51 +0000, Information wrote:
>
> [just catching up on news...]
>
>> could you clarify for me please , do all of CAT5/5E/6 have 8 wires

>
> Yes.
>
>> 5 and 6 actually refer to number of wires

>
> No. "Cat-5 UTP" == Category 5 Unshielded Twisted Pair wire.
>
> "Category" refers to the quality of the UTP cable, and its ability to
> support Ethernet-compliant signalling over a distance of 100m (328 ft)
> both with, and without intervening punch-down blocks, "bridge taps" and
> other line impairment. "Unshielded" means no grounded co-ax-like braid
> in the line, and thus some amount of EMI/RFI in normal operation.
> "Twisted" refers to the fact that wire pairs are wrapped around each
> other in the same bundle. A specific value or guaranteed number of
> twists per inch helps preserve uniform line impedance. The more uniform
> the line impedance, the higher the supportable signalling rate for a
> target line "reach". While Cat-5,6,6e have four twisted pairs, there
> are also 25-pair bundles. Generally, UTP has lower manufacturing cost
> than co-axial cable, but is (at least -was-) also more widely installed
> than any other kind of communication medium in this country. UTP has
> relatively poor control over line impedance per unit length, hence a
> need for different categories that could support different market
> segments.
>
> The target minimum line "reach" for fully-compliant Ethernet is 100m.
> "Cat-3" was originally qualified for 10Mb signalling known as 10Base-T.
> "Cat-5" has improved control over the number of twists per inch (and
> other physical characteristics) and will support 100Mb signalling known
> as 100Base-T. "Cat-6" has more improvements and will support 1Gb
> signalling known as 1000Base-T. The "e" in "cat-6e" means "extended
> reach". All of that means you should purchase and install Cat-3/5/6 if
> you want to ensure that your network will be fully compliant with
> 10/100/1000Base-T. On the other hand, if you know that your little home
> network (say) will never need to reach any machine over more than a
> half- dozen meters, and only support a few machines at one time, then
> Cat-5 likely will work fine with 1000Base-T.


....make that 3/5/5e/6. There is also "6a" and "7". FWIW, "Jordan" got
it wrong, "transmit" and "receive" are separate twisted pairs.
 
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