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Re: Am I doing something wrong? (again!)

 
 
Aardvark
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      11-01-2010
On Sun, 31 Oct 2010 23:41:12 +0000, ~BD~ wrote:

> I'm sure you recognise that the growth of Uniblue as a company is much
> in line with the exponential growth in Cybercrime over the same period.


As I would expect the growth in any computer security company to be. If
the two aren't connected, then there's something badly wrong with a comp
security company's business model.



--
"En un lugar de la Mancha, de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme,
no hace mucho tiempo que vivĂ*a un hidalgo de los de lanza en
astillero, adarga antigua, rocĂ*n flaco y galgo corredor."
-Cervantes, 'Don Quixote'
 
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Mike Easter
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      11-01-2010
~BD~ wrote:

>>> I scoured their web site and can find no 'phone
>>> number either (I once read that was a *bad* sign!)


Uniblue doesn't want people calling them on the phone. On their website
they have a method of contact for all of the following: press, job
applicants, those wishing to affiliate or partner with them, people
needing support or their newsletter, people needing help with their
order, people ordering in quantity.

All of those contact methods involve the use of their web interface.
They are a software company whose products involve people using the
internet, answering the 'phone isn't part of their operation. You might
say their telno is 'unpublished' as far as their website goes.

Apparently their certification with MS requires completing the telno
part. You can find the telno at the MS page I instructed you to recently.

Phone +356 (2) 327-5000
Fax +1 (2) 131-8998

http://bit.ly/cnHPvB Partner details - Uniblue Systems Ltd

I wouldn't call that a 'bad' sign in this context. It is just another
method of doing business. There are many companies which spend a fortune
providing 'phone support and so they have to outsource it and provide
cookbooks for the outsourced company to use and phone menus and all
kinds of unnecessary expense for a function they don't perform well.

Just because some company provides a published 'phone number doesn't
mean it actually works to allow you to call them up and chat with
someone important about something that happened to you on U2U.


--
Mike Easter
 
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Aardvark
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      11-01-2010
On Mon, 01 Nov 2010 15:59:31 +0000, ~BD~ wrote:

> Aardvark wrote:
>> On Sun, 31 Oct 2010 20:28:21 +0000, ~BD~ wrote:
>>
>>>> Uniblue's Head Office
>>>> Orange Point
>>>> Dun Karm Street
>>>> B'Kara By-Pass
>>>> Birkirkara BKR9037
>>>> Malta
>>>> European Union
>>>
>>> I tried may times to find that address using Google Maps - without
>>> success I might add.

>>
>> Either you didn't search as hard as you'd have us believe, or your
>> searching skills are nothing short of abysmal. I found the location in
>> less than a minute:
>>
>> 35 deg 54 min 10.55 sec N, 14 deg 28 min 03.65 E.

>
> My searching skills are obviously abysmal.
>


So you *did* search for as long as you would have us (tinu) believe. I
see.

> I've found it now. Would you believe it, it's only a stone's throw from
> Grand Harbour, Valetta. My first ship, HMS Defender, was based there
> when I was part of the crew (as an apprentice) in 1965. I spent a lot of
> time exploring all over the island - there was no B'Kara By-Pass then!
>


Of course not. You do realise that B'kara is a contraction of Birkirkara.
Much the same as motorway signs round here tell me that I'm on the way to
B'head.

> Some nice piccies here http://www.malta2.com/
>


Very nice.

>>> I scoured their web site and can find no 'phone number either (I once
>>> read that was a *bad* sign!)

>>
>> I should think that if I could be arsed to waste another five minutes,
>> I could find a phone number, but life's far too short.

>
> I guess. No work today?


No work until Thursday. A few days in Lichfield. Just down the road,
basically.



--
"En un lugar de la Mancha, de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme,
no hace mucho tiempo que vivĂ*a un hidalgo de los de lanza en
astillero, adarga antigua, rocĂ*n flaco y galgo corredor."
-Cervantes, 'Don Quixote'
 
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Aardvark
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      11-01-2010
On Mon, 01 Nov 2010 15:37:59 +0000, ~BD~ wrote:

> Personally, I'd have expected it to be in sync. with the growth in the
> use of computers (which I suspect is a somewhat flatter curve!).


Pick the bones out of this lot:

<http://www.frankwbaker.com/mediause.htm>

<http://www.lilith-ezine.com/articles/technology/Internet-Growing.html>

Seems to me that, even if the numbers of computers in use worldwide were
to stagnate (highly unlikely), internet use would still continue to rise.
Internet use rising, more people to fleece and more time to do it in.

Result, comp security firms grow year on year.

You're just looking for a reason, however tenuous, to declare Uniblue
'bad' guys.



--
"En un lugar de la Mancha, de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme,
no hace mucho tiempo que vivĂ*a un hidalgo de los de lanza en
astillero, adarga antigua, rocĂ*n flaco y galgo corredor."
-Cervantes, 'Don Quixote'
 
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Mike Easter
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      11-03-2010
~BD~ wrote:
> ~BD~ wrote:
>> Will pushing the pin-hole reset button on a SOHO router to reset it to
>> factory setting *always* clear any 'malware' which has tampered with the
>> device?

>
> Asking again!


Your question lacks specificity.

If the exploit were simply one of the perpetrator accessing the router's
configuration page, which is very commonly done by wardrivers to teach
people a lesson to not leave their router 'wide open', then the pinhole
reset would solve the problem. That is, that exploit most typically
consists of -1- access the router's configuration page via the default
pass -2- make a configuration change, such as securing the router and
-3- changing the default configuration password to the exploiter's choice.

Then the exploited would/could reset the router back to factory defaults
to reacquire use of the router. Unless they didn't know any better than
to 'junk' the router they couldn't use anymore and buy another router
and leave its default password and open condition.

There is no 'malware' that needs to be cleared involved in that exploit.

If the exploit were the more problematic/serious change in the router's
firmware, then the question would become whether or not reflashing the
firmware would restore the hacked router or not; and the pinhole
solution would definitely not work.

This 2006/2009 .pdf describes a theoretical firmware exploit which could
be performed on a vulnerable router.

http://nenolod.net/~nenolod/router-malware.pdf

If one would search they might be able to determine whether or not that
particular theoretical exploit could be remedied or 'undone' by
reflashing. The purpose of the paper was to discuss how one might
discover such an exploit.


--
Mike Easter
 
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Aardvark
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      11-03-2010
On Wed, 03 Nov 2010 00:20:35 +0000, ~BD~ wrote:

> Mike Easter wrote:


>> If one would search they might be able to determine whether or not that
>> particular theoretical exploit could be remedied or 'undone' by
>> reflashing. The purpose of the paper was to discuss how one might
>> discover such an exploit.
>>
>>
>>

> Many thanks Mike.
>
> I'll investigate tomorrow - it's time for my bed now!


Bear in mind that Mike used the word 'theoretical' twice in his post. I
think he should have used it a few more times, just to give it a chance
to sink into your brain.



--
"En un lugar de la Mancha, de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme,
no hace mucho tiempo que vivĂ*a un hidalgo de los de lanza en
astillero, adarga antigua, rocĂ*n flaco y galgo corredor."
-Cervantes, 'Don Quixote'
 
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Peter Foldes
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      11-03-2010
"~BD~" <~BD~@nomail.afraid.org> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Aardvark wrote:
>> On Wed, 03 Nov 2010 00:20:35 +0000, ~BD~ wrote


> Reading the document was a refamiliarisation with the document - which I first
> read in 2006.


David

You see how you lie. You did not even know what a Router was in 2006. It was Wilson
MS MVP who explained to you what the function of the router is on the Annex
newsgroup to which you replied "I am happy with my USRobotics modem.

Maybe you want to look to be a more of a computer expert which you are not

refamiliarisation is actually re-familiarization just in case for next time. Look it
up in the Oxford dictionary or any other one (If you can do it then we can do it
{spelling} )
--
Peter
Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
http://www.microsoft.com/protect


 
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Aardvark
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      11-03-2010
On Wed, 03 Nov 2010 13:42:57 +0000, ~BD~ wrote:

> Perhaps you will be able to put forward evidence to refute that such
> action is possible? Somehow I doubt it!


*Theoretically* it's possible.



--
"En un lugar de la Mancha, de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme,
no hace mucho tiempo que vivĂ*a un hidalgo de los de lanza en
astillero, adarga antigua, rocĂ*n flaco y galgo corredor."
-Cervantes, 'Don Quixote'
 
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Aardvark
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      11-03-2010
On Wed, 03 Nov 2010 13:54:40 +0000, ~BD~ wrote:

> I did experiment with re-flashing my Netgear router on a number of
> occasions, but I was less than confident with the results.


Why? I've debranded and flashed a few Netgear routers with no negstive
results. My own included.



--
"En un lugar de la Mancha, de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme,
no hace mucho tiempo que vivĂ*a un hidalgo de los de lanza en
astillero, adarga antigua, rocĂ*n flaco y galgo corredor."
-Cervantes, 'Don Quixote'
 
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Mike Easter
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-03-2010
~BD~ wrote:
> Mike Easter wrote:
>> ~BD~ wrote:


>>>> Will pushing the pin-hole reset button on a SOHO router to
>>>> reset it to factory setting *always* clear any 'malware' which
>>>> has tampered with the device?


>> If the exploit were simply one of the perpetrator accessing the router's
>> configuration page,


>> Then the exploited would/could reset the router back to factory defaults
>> to reacquire use of the router. Unless they didn't know any better than
>> to 'junk' the router they couldn't use anymore and buy another router
>> and leave its default password and open condition.

>
> I didn't 'junk' my router - but stopped using it! I changed my ISP and
> got a new one (a BT Home Hub) provided free of charge!


Are you saying that you think some perpetrator sabotaged your router?

What is the story on that? Did a piece of the sky fall on your head?

>> There is no 'malware' that needs to be cleared involved in that exploit.


> I did experiment with re-flashing my Netgear router on a number of
> occasions, but I was less than confident with the results.


*Why* - because of what condition of the router - did you flash it? Or
reset it to factory defaults for that matter?



--
Mike Easter
 
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