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coarse-grained object and fine-grain object

 
 
gk
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      09-06-2010
what is coarse-grained object and fine-grain object ? I find this
references in HTTPSession context.

(1)what are they ?
(2) why/how such peculiar varbiage ?
 
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Eric Sosman
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      09-06-2010
On 9/6/2010 8:30 AM, gk wrote:
> what is coarse-grained object and fine-grain object ? I find this
> references in HTTPSession context.
>
> (1)what are they ?


See this page for explanations:

http://www.google.com/search?q=coarse+grain+object

> (2) why/how such peculiar varbiage ?


Just the prafarance of whoaver invanted the tarminology.

--
Eric Sosman
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)lid
 
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Arved Sandstrom
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      09-06-2010
Eric Sosman wrote:
> On 9/6/2010 8:30 AM, gk wrote:
>> what is coarse-grained object and fine-grain object ? I find this
>> references in HTTPSession context.
>>
>> (1)what are they ?

>
> See this page for explanations:
>
> http://www.google.com/search?q=coarse+grain+object
>
>> (2) why/how such peculiar varbiage ?

>
> Just the prafarance of whoaver invanted the tarminology.


The Stan James comment in
http://www.coderanch.com/t/99845/pat...rained-objects
is how I usually see it. I got there by following your link.

AHS
--
Before a man speaks it is always safe to assume that he is a fool.
After he speaks, it is seldom necessary to assume it. -- H.L. Mencken


 
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Lew
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      09-06-2010

gk wrote:
>>> what is coarse-grained object and fine-grain object ? I find this
>>> references in HTTPSession context.
>>>
>>> (1)what are they ?


Eric Sosman wrote:
>> See this page for explanations:
>>
>> http://www.google.com/search?q=coarse+grain+object


gk wrote:
>>> (2) why/how such peculiar varbiage ?


Eric Sosman wrote:
>> Just the prafarance of whoaver invanted the tarminology.


There's absolutely nothing peculiar about the terminology. It is utterly
standard English and utterly common.

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granularity>

Why? Because the term accurately describes the usage.

How? By typing "coarse-grained" or "fine-grained".

--
Lew
 
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gk
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      09-07-2010
On Sep 6, 7:22*pm, "Arved Sandstrom" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Eric Sosman wrote:
> > On 9/6/2010 8:30 AM, gk wrote:
> >> what is coarse-grained object and fine-grain object ? I find this
> >> references in HTTPSession context.

>
> >> (1)what are they ?

>
> > * * See this page for explanations:

>
> >http://www.google.com/search?q=coarse+grain+object

>
> >> (2) why/how *such peculiar varbiage ?

>
> > * * Just the prafarance of whoaver invanted the tarminology.

>
> The Stan James comment inhttp://www.coderanch.com/t/99845/patterns/Coarse-grained-fine-grained...
> is how I usually see it. I got there by following your link.


Not yet clear. I found the following text from the link you posted.

It says...

Coarse grained is often better in distributed systems because calls
between distributed components can be expensive and time consuming.
Fine grained might be better in a very flexible system because clients
could invent new combinations of calls to do new tasks.


Not happy yet. Could you please provide EXAMPLE which could illustrate
the things better way.
I'm talking about coarse-grained *object* and fine-grain *object* in
HttpSession context. Looks like they are talking about something else.

 
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gk
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      09-07-2010
On Sep 6, 9:04*pm, Lew <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> gk wrote:
> >>> what is coarse-grained object and fine-grain object ? I find this
> >>> references in HTTPSession context.

>
> >>> (1)what are they ?

> Eric Sosman wrote:
> >> * * *See this page for explanations:

>
> >>http://www.google.com/search?q=coarse+grain+object

> gk wrote:
> >>> (2) why/how *such peculiar varbiage ?

> Eric Sosman wrote:
> >> * * *Just the prafarance of whoaver invanted the tarminology.

>
> There's absolutely nothing peculiar about the terminology. *It is utterly
> standard English and utterly common.
>
> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granularity>
>
> Why? *Because the term accurately describes the usage.


Ok. I have gone through that link . I find these texts interesting...

it says ...

"...For example, a yard broken into inches has finer granularity than
a yard broken into feet.
The terms granularity, coarse, and fine are relative, used when
comparing systems or descriptions of systems. An example of
increasingly fine granularity: a list of nations in the United
Nations, a list of all states/provinces in those nations, a list of
all counties in those states, etc...."

OK...so far the definition looks nice.

However, we are talking about coarse-grained objects and fine-grained
objects in HttpSession context ?

SO, Can we map this way that fine-grained objects holds more detailed
information properties of the object ? and coarse-grained objects are
less informative ?

In other words if I write two classes as below

class USA1{
private String[] states

}


class USA2{
private String[] states
private String[] city
private String[] mayor

}


Is not objects of class USA2 are finer grained objects now ? I say so
because they are holding much detailed information than objects of
class USA1) ?

So, In my understanding objects of class USA2 are finer grained
objects relative to objects of class USA1.

Correct me if my understanding is wrong.

Thanks
 
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John B. Matthews
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      09-07-2010
In article
<(E-Mail Removed)>,
gk <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Could you please provide EXAMPLE which could illustrate the things
> better way. I'm talking about coarse-grained *object* and fine-grain
> *object* in HttpSession context.


This article discusses granularity as it relates to the performance of
HTTPSession state persistence:

<http://www.theserverside.com/news/1364410/Under-the-Hood-of-J2EE-Clustering>

--
John B. Matthews
trashgod at gmail dot com
<http://sites.google.com/site/drjohnbmatthews>
 
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Lew
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      09-07-2010
On 09/07/2010 03:28 AM, gk wrote:
> On Sep 6, 9:04 pm, Lew<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> gk wrote:
>>>>> what is coarse-grained object and fine-grain object ? I find this
>>>>> references in HTTPSession context.

>>
>>>>> (1)what are they ?

>> Eric Sosman wrote:
>>>> See this page for explanations:

>>
>>>> http://www.google.com/search?q=coarse+grain+object

>> gk wrote:
>>>>> (2) why/how such peculiar varbiage ?

>> Eric Sosman wrote:
>>>> Just the prafarance of whoaver invanted the tarminology.

>>
>> There's absolutely nothing peculiar about the terminology. It is utterly
>> standard English and utterly common.
>>
>> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granularity>
>>
>> Why? Because the term accurately describes the usage.

>
> Ok. I have gone through that link . I find these texts interesting...
>
> it says ...
>
> "...For example, a yard broken into inches has finer granularity than
> a yard broken into feet.
> The terms granularity, coarse, and fine are relative, used when
> comparing systems or descriptions of systems. An example of
> increasingly fine granularity: a list of nations in the United
> Nations, a list of all states/provinces in those nations, a list of
> all counties in those states, etc...."
>
> OK...so far the definition looks nice.
>
> However, we are talking about coarse-grained objects and fine-grained
> objects in HttpSession context ?
>
> SO, Can we map this way that fine-grained objects holds more detailed
> information properties of the object ? and coarse-grained objects are
> less informative ?
>
> In other words if I write two classes as below
>
> class USA1{
> private String[] states
>
> }
>
>
> class USA2{
> private String[] states
> private String[] city
> private String[] mayor
>
> }
>
>
> Is not objects of class USA2 are finer grained objects now ? I say so
> because they are holding much detailed information than objects of
> class USA1) ?
>
> So, In my understanding objects of class USA2 are finer grained
> objects relative to objects of class USA1.
>
> Correct me if my understanding is wrong.


Eric and Arved already answered that question.

--
Lew
 
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gk
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      09-07-2010
On Sep 7, 5:16*pm, "John B. Matthews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> In article
> <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>
> *gk <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > Could you please provide EXAMPLE which could illustrate the things
> > better way. I'm talking about coarse-grained *object* and fine-grain
> > *object* in HttpSession context.

>
> This article discusses granularity as it relates to the performance of
> HTTPSession state persistence:
>
> <http://www.theserverside.com/news/1364410/Under-the-Hood-of-J2EE-Clus...>


Thanks. I have gone through that link . I did a quite R&D on this
stuff once upon a time in fact...Weblogic clustering and session
replication and load balancer.

But I could not get you . Which section is discussing about coars-
grained and fine-grained objects ? Is there any specific section you
are talking about ? could you please paste that relevant part if I'm
missing. I'd like to re-visit that part once again if I'm missed.

Thanks for your time.
 
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John B. Matthews
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      09-07-2010
In article
<(E-Mail Removed)>,
gk <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> On Sep 7, 5:16*pm, "John B. Matthews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > In article
> > <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> >
> > *gk <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > > Could you please provide EXAMPLE which could illustrate the
> > > things better way. I'm talking about coarse-grained *object* and
> > > fine-grain *object* in HttpSession context.

> >
> > This article discusses granularity as it relates to the performance
> > of HTTPSession state persistence:
> >

<http://www.theserverside.com/news/1364410/Under-the-Hood-of-J2EE-Clustering>
[...]
> But I could not get you. Which section is discussing about coars-
> grained and fine-grained objects ? Is there any specific section you
> are talking about? could you please paste that relevant part if I'm
> missing. I'd like to re-visit that part once again if I'm missed.


Searching the page cited for the keyword "granularity", this
observation seemed relevant: "Some J2EE vendors ... provide [a]
fine-granularity distributed-object sharing mechanism to improve
cluster performance." The section entitled "Backup granularity"
elaborates further.

For the connection among the terms granular, granularity, fine- and
coarse-grained, see

<http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/granular>

--
John B. Matthews
trashgod at gmail dot com
<http://sites.google.com/site/drjohnbmatthews>
 
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