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Re: Damn Kids!

 
 
OldGringo38
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-01-2010
On 9/1/2010 6:36 AM Just to please that super-ego, philo wrote the
following tidbit of information:
> My step-daughter borrowed our vacuum cleaner yesterday
>
> dang
>
> I was going to clean the entire house today.
>
>
> Oh well...guess it will have to wait until next year/
>
>
> that's ok though,
> the little feral cat that ran in the house the other day...(and stayed)
>
> is doing a great job of cleaning out all the spider webs...
>
> at least those no more than 6" off the ground

I could use a Siberian Tiger <g>

--
OldGringo38
Just West Of Nowhere
Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
Support Bacteria: They're the only culture some people have.
 
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joevan
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      09-01-2010
On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 07:13:14 -0500, philo <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On 09/01/2010 07:01 AM, OldGringo38 wrote:
>> On 9/1/2010 6:36 AM Just to please that super-ego, philo wrote the
>> following tidbit of information:
>>> My step-daughter borrowed our vacuum cleaner yesterday
>>>
>>> dang
>>>
>>> I was going to clean the entire house today.
>>>
>>>
>>> Oh well...guess it will have to wait until next year/
>>>
>>>
>>> that's ok though,
>>> the little feral cat that ran in the house the other day...(and stayed)
>>>
>>> is doing a great job of cleaning out all the spider webs...
>>>
>>> at least those no more than 6" off the ground

>> I could use a Siberian Tiger <g>
>>

>
>
>
>LOL
>
>or a giraffe perhaps

My ceilings are 12 feet high on the 1st floor so a giraffe could be
useful, except it might step on a valuable work of art and then I
would have to get rid of it. I think I will just stay with the feather
thingy on the long aluminum pole.
 
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joevan
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-01-2010
On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 14:58:04 -0500, philo <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On 09/01/2010 08:12 AM, joevan wrote:
>> On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 07:13:14 -0500, philo<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> On 09/01/2010 07:01 AM, OldGringo38 wrote:
>>>> On 9/1/2010 6:36 AM Just to please that super-ego, philo wrote the
>>>> following tidbit of information:
>>>>> My step-daughter borrowed our vacuum cleaner yesterday
>>>>>
>>>>> dang
>>>>>
>>>>> I was going to clean the entire house today.
>>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> LOL
>>>
>>> or a giraffe perhaps

>> My ceilings are 12 feet high on the 1st floor so a giraffe could be
>> useful, except it might step on a valuable work of art and then I
>> would have to get rid of it. I think I will just stay with the feather
>> thingy on the long aluminum pole.

>
>Yeah
>
>our house is over 100 years old
>and the first floor ceilings are 11 feet.
>
>I just take a long skinny dowel to clean off the cob webs from time to time.
>
>My standard joke , when I see a cobweb is:
>
>Gee I did not notice that when I bought the house.
>
>
>(I bought the house 30 years ago)

I must remember that. I bought this old 200 year old when I bought it
37 or so years ago. The reason the 1st floor is so high is that it
was a storefront. The floor beams were lowered to street level or just
a step or two up, once upon a time and is ideal for my conservation
lab, and has served as such for 27 years. I was here 10 years before I
moved my lab to my own place.
 
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joevan
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-01-2010
On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 17:54:55 -0500, philo <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On 09/01/2010 04:53 PM, joevan wrote:
>> On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 14:58:04 -0500, philo<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>

>
>
><snip>
>>>
>>> our house is over 100 years old
>>> and the first floor ceilings are 11 feet.
>>>
>>> I just take a long skinny dowel to clean off the cob webs from time to time.
>>>
>>> My standard joke , when I see a cobweb is:
>>>
>>> Gee I did not notice that when I bought the house.
>>>
>>>
>>> (I bought the house 30 years ago)

>> I must remember that. I bought this old 200 year old when I bought it
>> 37 or so years ago. The reason the 1st floor is so high is that it
>> was a storefront. The floor beams were lowered to street level or just
>> a step or two up, once upon a time and is ideal for my conservation
>> lab, and has served as such for 27 years. I was here 10 years before I
>> moved my lab to my own place.

>
>200 year old house?
>
>Wow, it must have one of those wooden TV antennas up on the roof
>
>
>Our house was built in 1898
>but luckily not electrified until 1932
>
>
>The wiring from 1932 is still good as it's conduit and BX
>
>Had it been done earlier it would have been knob and tube!

There is some knob and tube on the 4th floor. I don't use it but it is
there in the floor, fastened to the beams. I can see where it could
have been safe to a degree. I have rewired the house except for some
old stuff I use for a few lights, low usage. The only wires I did not
install was the entrance, 200 amp that I had done by a professional.
One of his workers standing on 3/4 inch thick piece of plywood would
test the circuits with his fingers and report to the boss. That's 110
and this is 220. I just stood and watched not getting too close.
He was one tough black man for sure.
Once I had an oil company overfill my tank and about 20 gallons went
on the basement floor. That got me ****ed. I had an adjuster but only
got a few thousand bucks to clean it all and repair the tank where
they had busted the pipe loose.
I remember it all because of Jim who was a wonderful black man who
impressed me with his knowledge of lots of stuff. He and his helper
got that tank cleaned, piping repaired and the place smelling great in
one day. Jim was 75 at the time and strong and able a man to see.
 
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joevan
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-02-2010
On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 18:26:32 -0500, philo <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>Our house was of course coal heat originally.
>
>I still find clinkers in the yard...
>and I even found a few chunks of coal in the basement.
>The coal shovel is still hanging on a hook in the basement...
>and I still occasionally see someone shoveling snow in the winter...
>with an old coal shovel they've found in the basement!
>
>When I bought the house it was oil heat and had two tanks in the basement.
>
>One tank sprung a leak, so the owner just had a second installed but was
>too cheap to get rid of the first!
>
>The basement still had an oil smell.
>s
>When I converted to gas , I sawed up the old tanks
>and got rid of them...cleaned up the oil
>and after about six months or so, the smell was finally gone.
>
>It was sure a mess getting rid of the old tanks!

There were chemicals they used to rid the smell of oil.
This house had 10 fireplaces when new, wood heat, all closed off and
gone now.
Just the outline of some of them. I had to close up the openings to
the rooms in 4 of them. Chimneys were removed from the basement and
most of the 1st floor. You can see the bottom of what is now the
bottom of the chimney when looking up at the ceiling on the 1st floor.
I have one 1780 or so wooden mantle that my father in law restored for
me. It was given to me by a friend who lived in a place where these
things were trashed. It had been left it out to weather and it was
bowed in a few places but father in law did a beautiful job and after
a few coats of good white enamel it is a treasured piece in my living
room.
There are openings in the basement hall way that would have had
doors leading to small rooms that probably were used for "staff" in
1800. A house like this had to have lots of help to keep it working
back then. I do it all myself now. And have with a little help from my
friends now and then.
I replaced the roof down to the beams and replaced the old wooden
shingles, many layers of roofing including metal, tar paper and one
spot where someone had tried for years to fix a leak, a 20 ball of tar
fell to the 3rd floor hallway when I was working to remove the ole
roofing stuff. I replaced it all with yellow pine lounge and grove. I
was 32 then and could haul an 80 pound of sand or mortar mix up 3
flights of stairs and then out to the roof. I can still do it but not
as fast as I could then. As a matter of fact I got married that year.
And 6 years ago this November Wife passed on at 51 after 30 years
together.
 
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joevan
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-02-2010
On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 18:26:32 -0500, philo <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>Our house was of course coal heat originally.
>
>I still find clinkers in the yard...
>and I even found a few chunks of coal in the basement.
>The coal shovel is still hanging on a hook in the basement...
>and I still occasionally see someone shoveling snow in the winter...
>with an old coal shovel they've found in the basement!
>
>When I bought the house it was oil heat and had two tanks in the basement.
>
>One tank sprung a leak, so the owner just had a second installed but was
>too cheap to get rid of the first!
>
>The basement still had an oil smell.
>s
>When I converted to gas , I sawed up the old tanks
>and got rid of them...cleaned up the oil
>and after about six months or so, the smell was finally gone.
>
>It was sure a mess getting rid of the old tanks!

There were chemicals they used to rid the smell of oil.
This house had 10 fireplaces when new, wood heat, all closed off and
gone now.
Just the outline of some of them. I had to close up the openings to
the rooms in 4 of them. Chimneys were removed from the basement and
most of the 1st floor. You can see the bottom of what is now the
bottom of the chimney when looking up at the ceiling on the 1st floor.
I have one 1780 or so wooden mantle that my father in law restored for
me. It was given to me by a friend who lived in a place where these
things were trashed. It had been left it out to weather and it was
bowed in a few places but father in law did a beautiful job and after
a few coats of good white enamel it is a treasured piece in my living
room.
There are openings in the basement hall way that would have had
doors leading to small rooms that probably were used for "staff" in
1800. A house like this had to have lots of help to keep it working
back then. I do it all myself now. And have with a little help from my
friends now and then.
I replaced the roof down to the beams and replaced the old wooden
shingles, many layers of roofing including metal, tar paper and one
spot where someone had tried for years to fix a leak, a 20 ball of tar
fell to the 3rd floor hallway when I was working to remove the ole
roofing stuff. I replaced it all with yellow pine lounge and grove. I
was 32 then and could haul an 80 pound of sand or mortar mix up 3
flights of stairs and then out to the roof. I can still do it but not
as fast as I could then. As a matter of fact I got married that year.
And 6 years ago this November Wife passed on at 51 after 30 years
together.
 
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joevan
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-02-2010
Sometimes a post hangs up and I have to go to all folders and find the
message and open it and post it from there, And it does it twice for
some reason. Sorry about that.
 
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Aardvark
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-02-2010
On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 17:54:55 -0500, philo wrote:

> 200 year old house?
>
> Wow, it must have one of those wooden TV antennas up on the roof


The oldest part of our local pub is about 400 years old.The main part of
it is about 200 + years old. I can walk to the local shopping mall and up
there on top of a hill which overlooks the town is a castle which is
about 800 years old.

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halton_Castle>



--
"When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle.
Then I realised God doesn’t work that way, so I stole one and
prayed for forgiveness." - Emo Phillips
 
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Meat Plow
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-02-2010
On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 18:26:32 -0500, philo wrote:

> On 09/01/2010 06:17 PM, joevan wrote:
>> On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 17:54:55 -0500, philo<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> On 09/01/2010 04:53 PM, joevan wrote:
>>>> On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 14:58:04 -0500, philo<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>

>
>
> <snip>
>>>
>>> Wow, it must have one of those wooden TV antennas up on the roof
>>>
>>>
>>> Our house was built in 1898
>>> but luckily not electrified until 1932
>>>
>>>
>>> The wiring from 1932 is still good as it's conduit and BX
>>>
>>> Had it been done earlier it would have been knob and tube!

>> There is some knob and tube on the 4th floor. I don't use it but it is
>> there in the floor, fastened to the beams. I can see where it could
>> have been safe to a degree. I have rewired the house except for some
>> old stuff I use for a few lights, low usage. The only wires I did not
>> install was the entrance, 200 amp that I had done by a professional.
>> One of his workers standing on 3/4 inch thick piece of plywood would
>> test the circuits with his fingers and report to the boss. That's 110
>> and this is 220. I just stood and watched not getting too close. He
>> was one tough black man for sure.
>> Once I had an oil company overfill my tank and about 20 gallons went on
>> the basement floor. That got me ****ed. I had an adjuster but only got
>> a few thousand bucks to clean it all and repair the tank where they had
>> busted the pipe loose.
>> I remember it all because of Jim who was a wonderful black man who
>> impressed me with his knowledge of lots of stuff. He and his helper
>> got that tank cleaned, piping repaired and the place smelling great in
>> one day. Jim was 75 at the time and strong and able a man to see.

>
>
>
> Our house was of course coal heat originally.



My house has a coal chute door on the side. I put a new furnace in back
in 1990. Bought it from Sears, did the install myself. Only had to modify
the plenum to widen it slightly so it would fit the opening of the new
furnace. And had to make a new cold air return. Previous furnace had a
cracked heat exchanger but was not a gas converted coal job. This house
was built in the mid 40's so I'm assuming there was no natural gas around
here then. This used to be very rural America around here but had been a
city since 1885.


--
Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
 
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Aardvark
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      09-02-2010
On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 20:37:01 -0500, philo wrote:

> On 09/01/2010 07:57 PM, Aardvark wrote:
>> On Wed, 01 Sep 2010 17:54:55 -0500, philo wrote:
>>
>>> 200 year old house?
>>>
>>> Wow, it must have one of those wooden TV antennas up on the roof

>>
>> The oldest part of our local pub is about 400 years old.The main part
>> of it is about 200 + years old. I can walk to the local shopping mall
>> and up there on top of a hill which overlooks the town is a castle
>> which is about 800 years old.
>>
>> <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halton_Castle>
>>
>>
>>
>>

>
> In the US a 200 year old building is considered ancient.
>


In Australia you'd be hard pushed to find a building that old.

> The first time I went to Europe I was absolutely in awe of the
> architecture!


Graeco-Roman always hits the spot.

> I just hate it when people think everything must be new.
>


Had a discussion in another group where someone had come back from Vegas
and was saying how remarkable and awe-inspiring they found the
architecture there. They were talking about some rip-off Italianate hotel
whose design was based on some of the structures in Venice. The OP
couldn't get her head round the fact that it wasn't a patch on the real
thing. She insisted that despite the fact that the buildings in Vegas
were copies of historical edifices, they were somehow the 'real' thing.

Who needs to go to Venice when you can see the real thing in Vegas?

> Been to England twice... a truly wonderful country.
>


Where did you go in the country, and when were your visits?

>
> What history!


Indeed. Did you know that the effects of the Norman invasion of England
in 1066 are still in evidence in the English-speaking world, and further
afield?



--
"When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle.
Then I realised God doesn’t work that way, so I stole one and
prayed for forgiveness." - Emo Phillips
 
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