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Powersupply question- making sound want to replace,, desktop

 
 
KOS
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2010
Hi, I have a desktop that is making a loud noise. coming from the
powersupply. I want to replace the entire power supply, I have read
that I should not do this as it is dangerous and I could get
electrocuted... Is this true, is this something that lay people should
not do? Thanks
KOS
 
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Paul
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2010
KOS wrote:
> Hi, I have a desktop that is making a loud noise. coming from the
> powersupply. I want to replace the entire power supply, I have read
> that I should not do this as it is dangerous and I could get
> electrocuted... Is this true, is this something that lay people should
> not do? Thanks
> KOS


The output of the power supply, uses various low DC voltages. The wires
have insulation on them. The connectors are designed with the intention
of not letting you get in contact with electricity. Those factors are
what helps with the safety.

There would be more potential danger, if you removed the cover from
the top of the ATX supply. If you leave the top cover in place, then
there is little danger.

This article will help with some background information.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psucon...onnectors.html

Unplugging the computer from the wall, removes the input power.
You wait 30 second after that, before working on the PC. That
gives time for residual +5VSB to drain. At that point, it should
then be safe to unplug the various cables. You do the same thing,
before changing memory modules. Remove the power, then wait 30 seconds
for the supply to drain, so none of the components inside are
getting power any more.

Before removing all the cabling, make diagrams and notes of where it
all goes. It can be intimidating the first time you do it, and
if you've made notes and diagrams in advance, that will make
the job easier to complete.

For more advice on power supplies, you need to tell us the
make and model of computer, such as "HP Pavilion 1234". That
way, we can get some idea what challenges you'll face.

Supplies vary in quality, and the price charged, is not always
a guarantee you're getting a good one. Finding customer
reviews can help you find the good ones.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...tem=17-165-023

"I bought this to replace a customers power supply. It worked
for 40 days. I guess you get what you pay for."

Those are the kind of review comments, that can identify the less
useful purchases.

Paul
 
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gnu / linux
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2010
On Jul 21, 5:40*pm, "James D. Andrews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> "KOS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> > Hi, I have a desktop that is making a loud noise. coming from the
> > powersupply. I want to replace the entire power supply, *I have read
> > that I should not do this as it is dangerous and I could get
> > electrocuted... Is this true, is this something that lay people should
> > not do? Thanks
> > KOS

>
> It's not dangerous to replace the power supply unless you keep it plugged in
> while doing it. *NEVER keep it plugged in while working inside your
> computer.
>
> You should never try to repair or open the power supply unit, however.
>
> If your power supply unit (PSU) is making funny noises, you should go ahead
> and replace it before it causes damage to something else in your computer
> like your drives or your motherboard. *Depending on the model, you can get a
> PSU pretty cheap, or if it's a killer gaming rig, you'll probably have to
> fork out some cash.
>
> Replacing a PSU is rather easy - 4 screws and a handful of wires. *But you
> need to make sure it's of sufficient wattage, and you must make sure that
> you connect the proper wires when you replace the unit.
>
> Not knowing how old your computer is or what model, can't say what your
> motherboard power connectors are, whether a single 24-pin, a 20-pin + a
> 4-pin, or something different (my old Dell uses a 20-pin + a 6-pin
> connector). *Obviously, the new PSU you buy needs to have the same
> connectors, or you'll need adapters - much more complicated, but possible..
>
> If you don't know what I'm talking about regarding pins, look it up before
> you buy. *There are plenty of tutorials on-line. *Learn what you're dealing
> with before you start.
>
> --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: (E-Mail Removed) ---


$ 50.00 & 4 screws - EASY job unless your failing unit is riveted in
(Dell, HP) ...
 
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KOS
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2010
On Jul 21, 8:30*pm, "gnu / linux" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Jul 21, 5:40*pm, "James D. Andrews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > "KOS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

>
> >news:(E-Mail Removed)....

>
> > > Hi, I have a desktop that is making a loud noise. coming from the
> > > powersupply. I want to replace the entire power supply, *I have read
> > > that I should not do this as it is dangerous and I could get
> > > electrocuted... Is this true, is this something that lay people should
> > > not do? Thanks
> > > KOS

>
> > It's not dangerous to replace the power supply unless you keep it plugged in
> > while doing it. *NEVER keep it plugged in while working inside your
> > computer.

>
> > You should never try to repair or open the power supply unit, however.

>
> > If your power supply unit (PSU) is making funny noises, you should go ahead
> > and replace it before it causes damage to something else in your computer
> > like your drives or your motherboard. *Depending on the model, you can get a
> > PSU pretty cheap, or if it's a killer gaming rig, you'll probably have to
> > fork out some cash.

>
> > Replacing a PSU is rather easy - 4 screws and a handful of wires. *But you
> > need to make sure it's of sufficient wattage, and you must make sure that
> > you connect the proper wires when you replace the unit.

>
> > Not knowing how old your computer is or what model, can't say what your
> > motherboard power connectors are, whether a single 24-pin, a 20-pin + a
> > 4-pin, or something different (my old Dell uses a 20-pin + a 6-pin
> > connector). *Obviously, the new PSU you buy needs to have the same
> > connectors, or you'll need adapters - much more complicated, but possible.

>
> > If you don't know what I'm talking about regarding pins, look it up before
> > you buy. *There are plenty of tutorials on-line. *Learn what you're dealing
> > with before you start.

>
> > --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: (E-Mail Removed) ---

>
> $ 50.00 & 4 screws - EASY job unless your failing unit is riveted in
> (Dell, HP) ...- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Hi everybody

I opened the case of my gateway- its an older gateway 2000E- i think
thats what it is called, from the year 2000.. A desktop
I took down the following # from the powersupply- Newton Power, S/N
HXTO followed by a long number, Model NPS200P6

output 5v 200w max

so what kind of powersupply should I get, I just want to replace with
what I have.
Also, whats a good place to get one at a decent price
thanks for all your help!!
 
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KOS
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2010
On Jul 22, 3:42*pm, KOS <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Jul 21, 8:30*pm, "gnu / linux" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Jul 21, 5:40*pm, "James D. Andrews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
> > > "KOS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

>
> > >news:(E-Mail Removed)....

>
> > > > Hi, I have a desktop that is making a loud noise. coming from the
> > > > powersupply. I want to replace the entire power supply, *I have read
> > > > that I should not do this as it is dangerous and I could get
> > > > electrocuted... Is this true, is this something that lay people should
> > > > not do? Thanks
> > > > KOS

>
> > > It's not dangerous to replace the power supply unless you keep it plugged in
> > > while doing it. *NEVER keep it plugged in while working inside your
> > > computer.

>
> > > You should never try to repair or open the power supply unit, however..

>
> > > If your power supply unit (PSU) is making funny noises, you should go ahead
> > > and replace it before it causes damage to something else in your computer
> > > like your drives or your motherboard. *Depending on the model, you can get a
> > > PSU pretty cheap, or if it's a killer gaming rig, you'll probably have to
> > > fork out some cash.

>
> > > Replacing a PSU is rather easy - 4 screws and a handful of wires. *But you
> > > need to make sure it's of sufficient wattage, and you must make sure that
> > > you connect the proper wires when you replace the unit.

>
> > > Not knowing how old your computer is or what model, can't say what your
> > > motherboard power connectors are, whether a single 24-pin, a 20-pin + a
> > > 4-pin, or something different (my old Dell uses a 20-pin + a 6-pin
> > > connector). *Obviously, the new PSU you buy needs to have the same
> > > connectors, or you'll need adapters - much more complicated, but possible.

>
> > > If you don't know what I'm talking about regarding pins, look it up before
> > > you buy. *There are plenty of tutorials on-line. *Learn what you're dealing
> > > with before you start.

>
> > > --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: (E-Mail Removed) ---

>
> > $ 50.00 & 4 screws - EASY job unless your failing unit is riveted in
> > (Dell, HP) ...- Hide quoted text -

>
> > - Show quoted text -

>
> Hi everybody
>
> I opened the case of my gateway- its an older gateway 2000E- i think
> thats what it is called, from the year 2000.. A desktop
> I took down the following # from the powersupply- Newton Power, S/N
> HXTO followed by a long number, *Model NPS200P6
>
> output 5v 200w max
>
> so what kind of powersupply should I get, I just want to replace with
> what I have.
> Also, whats a good place to get one at a decent price
> thanks for all your help!!- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


actually it is a gateway 500s
 
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Paul
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2010
KOS wrote:
> On Jul 22, 3:42 pm, KOS <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> On Jul 21, 8:30 pm, "gnu / linux" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Jul 21, 5:40 pm, "James D. Andrews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>> "KOS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>> Hi, I have a desktop that is making a loud noise. coming from the
>>>>> powersupply. I want to replace the entire power supply, I have read
>>>>> that I should not do this as it is dangerous and I could get
>>>>> electrocuted... Is this true, is this something that lay people should
>>>>> not do? Thanks
>>>>> KOS
>>>> It's not dangerous to replace the power supply unless you keep it plugged in
>>>> while doing it. NEVER keep it plugged in while working inside your
>>>> computer.
>>>> You should never try to repair or open the power supply unit, however.
>>>> If your power supply unit (PSU) is making funny noises, you should go ahead
>>>> and replace it before it causes damage to something else in your computer
>>>> like your drives or your motherboard. Depending on the model, you can get a
>>>> PSU pretty cheap, or if it's a killer gaming rig, you'll probably have to
>>>> fork out some cash.
>>>> Replacing a PSU is rather easy - 4 screws and a handful of wires. But you
>>>> need to make sure it's of sufficient wattage, and you must make sure that
>>>> you connect the proper wires when you replace the unit.
>>>> Not knowing how old your computer is or what model, can't say what your
>>>> motherboard power connectors are, whether a single 24-pin, a 20-pin + a
>>>> 4-pin, or something different (my old Dell uses a 20-pin + a 6-pin
>>>> connector). Obviously, the new PSU you buy needs to have the same
>>>> connectors, or you'll need adapters - much more complicated, but possible.
>>>> If you don't know what I'm talking about regarding pins, look it up before
>>>> you buy. There are plenty of tutorials on-line. Learn what you're dealing
>>>> with before you start.
>>>> --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: (E-Mail Removed) ---
>>> $ 50.00 & 4 screws - EASY job unless your failing unit is riveted in
>>> (Dell, HP) ...- Hide quoted text -
>>> - Show quoted text -

>> Hi everybody
>>
>> I opened the case of my gateway- its an older gateway 2000E- i think
>> thats what it is called, from the year 2000.. A desktop
>> I took down the following # from the powersupply- Newton Power, S/N
>> HXTO followed by a long number, Model NPS200P6
>>
>> output 5v 200w max
>>
>> so what kind of powersupply should I get, I just want to replace with
>> what I have.
>> Also, whats a good place to get one at a decent price
>> thanks for all your help!!- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -

>
> actually it is a gateway 500s


http://www.howtofixcomputers.com/bb/sutra787467.html

"It's standard ATX size, but it uses a mounting bracket attached
to the front that slides into slots in the top of the case. It also rests
on a couple lower supports, then is held in place by a lever. I removed the
bracket (two screws) to see if the PS would be stable without it. No go.
So I can't easily swap out with a standard ATX PS. I don't see a practical
way to attach the bracket to another PS - don't particularly like the idea
of drilling holes into it. I also considered just swapping out the case,
but that gets more complicated."

And looking at the description, your computer has a P4 processor, which means
it'll have the standard ATX12V 2x2 cable for powering the processor (two
yellow wires and two black wires).

(You can find pictures of a lot of the connectors here if you need them.)
http://www.playtool.com/pages/psucon...onnectors.html

I'd take the side off the computer, and verify that is how it fastens. On
the computer cases I have here, when I want to change a standard ATX supply,
there are four screws that go through the back of the computer case, and
screw into four holes on the fan-switch-cord side of the power supply. But
your Gateway 500s, seems to use slides and a bracket and a locking lever.
Probably intended for the factory assembly line, to take less time
putting in the supply or something.

Now, this picture, on the other hand, looks smaller than an ATX. You can
see there are screw holes on the top of it, to hold a bracket. Perhaps
the bracket is an attempt to adapt a smaller supply for a computer case
that holds a standard ATX ?

http://www.memoryworld.com/servlet/t...ly-500S/Detail

*******

These are three documents I have copies of, that define ATX supplies.
The 1.1 version still has -5V on it, but it is hard to tell whether computers
of that era, actually have a need for -5V or not. They were supposed to
stop using -5V, well before the 1.3 version of the ATX standard came out,
but I probably have at least one computer here, that won't start unless
a supply with a -5V wire on it, is connected.

http://web.archive.org/web/200304240...12V_PS_1_1.pdf

http://www.formfactors.org/developer...X12V_1_3dg.pdf

http://www.formfactors.org/developer...public_br2.pdf

If I look at the "ATX_ATX12V_PS_1_1.pdf" spec for example, the
dimensions of a standard ATX supply are listed on page 23. They're
86mm high and 150mm wide. I measured a dead ATX I have here, and
got 3.39" high and 5.91" wide. The length (how far back in an ATX
case the power supply goes), can vary somewhat, with the monster
power supplies with very high outputs, being longer than others.

On page 27 is a table of wire colors for the main connector.
That is supposed to be a hint for what voltages are present on
what pins. You want to verify those colors, to help you decide
whether your supply is a standard ATX or not.

*******

One problem with something of this age, is finding a picture of
it that actually matches what you've got. There are any number
of tricks they can use, to make the supply more difficult
to replace with a standard one.

The rating of your supply, 200W, is not a lot of power. If you
look at the label, there should be ratings for each of the
DC outputs. On a Pentium 4 processor based system, a typical
desired rating might be 12V @ 15A for example. You don't want
to go too much lower than that, without having a very good
idea what the actual load is. Your new supply, should meet or
exceed the maximum current ratings listed on the label of
the current supply. Chances are, there will be enough
wire assemblies on the new supply, to wire up the supply.
You will likely have cables left over, which is fine. They
don't need to be connected.

It is also OK, to use a higher power supply, such as 350W,
in place of a 200W supply. The wattage rating is the maximum
output, rather than a constant level of power being output
all the time. You can draw 100W from a 200W supply or from a
350W supply, and the power company will bill you for 100W.
So the supply wattage rating is its maximum, rather than being an
"all the time" kind of rating. The 350W is not "wasting" 150W
more than the 200W one would have.

The current supply will likely have a 20 pin connector. If there is a
wire and pin for pin 18, that means the supply has -5V output
on it. We don't know whether the computer needs that, or that
is coincidence. Most modern supplies will have pin 18 (white wire)
removed, and there would be no pin in that location.

Another thing on modern supplies, is the main connector is 24 pins.
Most supplies will have a provision to split the connector
into two pieces. Such a connector is called a "20+4", because
of the size of the two pieces. The 20 pin section, can be plugged
into an older motherboard (you leave the other 4 pin bit dangling,
and it never gets used in that case). That is an attempt at being
backward compatible, with the least amount of trouble for the
installer. By splitting a 20+4 connector, you can power older
20 pin motherboards like yours. So even the latest supply, can
be used inside your case.

Power supply selection can take seconds, or hours, depending on
the vintage of the computer, and the things you read about it.
Take your time, and do some more reading, before rushing off and
buying something.

If your supply does have some goofy mounting system, that
isn't going to help matters. I can't recommend drilling
holes into a new power supply, due to the danger of metal
filings causing a short circuit inside the supply. In any
case, have a look at it, for any details like that.

By the way, that power supply part number could be NPS-200-pb
rather than p6. It would appear there are quite a few
different models of Newton brand supplies.

The Gateway site may also have specs for the supply. Gateway
has their own part numbers, which call up one of several
equivalent supplies. This is just an example, rather than
being for your supply.

http://support.gateway.com/s/POWER/6...Q0015810.shtml

The Gateway site, recommends a few sellers as sources of replacement
parts.

http://www.gateway.com/retail/accessories.php

For example, this would be a page with some "500S" computer parts.
Note that the supplies are keyed by Gateway part numbers, and the
form factor is different on a couple of the entries. It's hard to
believe they're all relevant for your computer. Take a look at
the pictures and see what you think. The higher power ones are
the same price as the lower power ones. I notice the supplies
they're selling here, have a fan attached to the outside of
the case, rather than having it mounted inside.

http://www.skyline-eng.com/index.cfm...tegory_id=5324

Newegg.com carries plenty of power supplies, probably hundreds of them,
but you'd have to carefully check all the details before using
one of those.

Paul
 
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KOS
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-22-2010
On Jul 22, 6:55*pm, "James D. Andrews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> "KOS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Jul 22, 3:42 pm, KOS <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Jul 21, 8:30 pm, "gnu / linux" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > > On Jul 21, 5:40 pm, "James D. Andrews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
> > > > "KOS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

>
> > > >news:(E-Mail Removed)...

>
> > > > > Hi, I have a desktop that is making a loud noise. coming from the
> > > > > powersupply. I want to replace the entire power supply, I have read
> > > > > that I should not do this as it is dangerous and I could get
> > > > > electrocuted... Is this true, is this something that lay people
> > > > > should
> > > > > not do? Thanks
> > > > > KOS

>
> > Hi everybody

>
> > I opened the case of my gateway- its an older gateway 2000E- i think
> > thats what it is called, from the year 2000.. A desktop
> > I took down the following # from the powersupply- Newton Power, S/N
> > HXTO followed by a long number, Model NPS200P6

>
> > output 5v 200w max

>
> > so what kind of powersupply should I get, I just want to replace with
> > what I have.
> > Also, whats a good place to get one at a decent price
> > thanks for all your help!!- Hide quoted text -

>
> > - Show quoted text -

>
> actually it is a gateway 500s
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------*-----------
>
> Wow! I searched for over an hour for you and came to the conclusion: your
> computer does not exist. *Not even on the Gateway site.
>
> No, actually, what few Gateway 500s models I could find had 160W power
> supplies, and the 500s model is difficult to find as it is. *I found no
> matches on a general search, and on specific sites for a matching power
> supply came up blank. *There were a few later 500-series models with 200W,
> but still difficult difficult to find and still without the specific
> matching power supply unit for your unit.
>
> I couldn't even find a site for Newton Power. *Maybe one of the other guys
> can come up with it.
>
> Anyway, it's still probably a good idea to upgrade to a little bit higher
> wattage PSU in case you decide to add parts to your computer later.
>
> You might find something adequate atwww.newegg.com
>
> They have 200W-250W PSUs ranging from $14.99 + $4.99 shipping - $27.99 +
> $9.20 shipping.
>
> REMEMBER: You have to know if your connectors are 24-pin, 20-pin, or 20-pin
> + 4-pin to select a PSU that will power your motherboard without adapters..
>
> I wouldn't go too high a wattage or price.
>
> --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: (E-Mail Removed) ---- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Hi there. Okay, so what do you think I should do for the power supply,
as far as watts- 200w-250? What is good to be on the safe side . the
current one says on the label 200w max...

Now as far as the connectors...I dont know what they are all i can
tell you is that I have a Intel (essex) Pent 4 - 1.8GHZ (400MHZ)
motherboard.. So I dont know what the connectors are though.
thanks
KOS
 
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Jeff Strickland
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-23-2010

"KOS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi, I have a desktop that is making a loud noise. coming from the
> powersupply. I want to replace the entire power supply, I have read
> that I should not do this as it is dangerous and I could get
> electrocuted... Is this true, is this something that lay people should
> not do? Thanks
> KOS



You can't get electrocuted.

Turn the machine off, uplug it, open the case, unplug the supply, plug in
the new one. It's really that easy.





 
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Jeff Strickland
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-23-2010

"James D. Andrews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:i27t13$21km$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "KOS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Hi, I have a desktop that is making a loud noise. coming from the
>> powersupply. I want to replace the entire power supply, I have read
>> that I should not do this as it is dangerous and I could get
>> electrocuted... Is this true, is this something that lay people should
>> not do? Thanks
>> KOS

>
> It's not dangerous to replace the power supply unless you keep it plugged
> in while doing it. NEVER keep it plugged in while working inside your
> computer.
>


And the danger there is to the computer, not to the person.




 
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KOS
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-23-2010
On Jul 23, 10:55*am, "Jeff Strickland" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> "James D. Andrews" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in messagenews:i27t13$21km$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>
>
> > "KOS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >news:(E-Mail Removed)....
> >> Hi, I have a desktop that is making a loud noise. coming from the
> >> powersupply. I want to replace the entire power supply, *I have read
> >> that I should not do this as it is dangerous and I could get
> >> electrocuted... Is this true, is this something that lay people should
> >> not do? Thanks
> >> KOS

>
> > It's not dangerous to replace the power supply unless you keep it plugged
> > in while doing it. *NEVER keep it plugged in while working inside your
> > computer.

>
> And the danger there is to the computer, not to the person.


PAUL

what about this power supply?
http://www.skyline-eng.com/index.cfm...roduct_ID=5737

does this look like it would fit the gateway 500s? I have a newton
power supply now model NPS 200PB
 
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