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Do gas-filled windows block wireless signal?

 
 
Don Phillipson
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      06-28-2010
Wireless broadband was always marginal here (at least one
mile from the tower, with trees in the line of sight ) and became
impossible the day the windows were replaced with modern
"Energy Star" units, double-pane sealed units filled with gas
(either argon or krypton, I forget which.) I could not be sure of
the cause, but managed to reach an ISP engineer. One of his
suggestions was to try the directional wireless modem at an open
window, i.e. no glass -- which immediately provided a satisfactory
signal. I have instructions for various tests thus will quantify the
difference if I can.

The engineer said he had never heard of either window structure
(aluminum here with steel magnets that hold the fly screens in place)
or gas-filled sealed panes obstructing wireless signals. Has anyone else?

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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)


 
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George
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      06-28-2010
On 6/28/2010 5:11 PM, Don Phillipson wrote:
> Wireless broadband was always marginal here (at least one
> mile from the tower, with trees in the line of sight ) and became
> impossible the day the windows were replaced with modern
> "Energy Star" units, double-pane sealed units filled with gas
> (either argon or krypton, I forget which.) I could not be sure of
> the cause, but managed to reach an ISP engineer. One of his
> suggestions was to try the directional wireless modem at an open
> window, i.e. no glass -- which immediately provided a satisfactory
> signal. I have instructions for various tests thus will quantify the
> difference if I can.
>
> The engineer said he had never heard of either window structure
> (aluminum here with steel magnets that hold the fly screens in place)
> or gas-filled sealed panes obstructing wireless signals. Has anyone else?
>


If the windows were touted as "low e" you found your problem. Various
metal oxide coatings are either in the glass or coating the glass to
lower the emissivity. Metal is also great for shielding RF.
 
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atec77
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      06-26-2011
On 26/06/2011 1:13 PM, lightblub wrote:
> Interesting, what else blocks wifi signals?
> I know microwaves seem to interfere with the wifi but what else??????
>
>

Metal film like solar shield does , anything with metallic content will
or you can defeat the signal with pure bulk

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atec77
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      06-27-2011
On 27/06/2011 12:36 PM, lightblub wrote:
> Interesting atec77, Conversely is there any way that you can make the
> signal better.
> I have heard a few methods but nothing concrete.
>
>

You need to be specific as to your needs

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