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Virus Proof version of Windows.

 
 
The Flavored Coffee Guy
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      03-31-2010

Hello,

It's simple, you design the next version of windows to operate on a
computer with 2 hard drives. Windows resides on one drive, which will have
the write function turned off, and it writes to the second drive for all
settings. When you install windows, drivers can be written to that drive.
But in the design plan is that a mechanical switch will be used to turn off
the hard drive's ability to be written to by the operating system.
Eventually, windows would be able to load and start faster because of this.
This is a really simplified reason but, a flash memory card can be planted
on the motherboard and serve as the installation drive. Then you would take
out the flash drive, switch off the write function to make it a read only
drive.

Then no virus can destroy the operating system. Frankly, it can't write
to it. If a virus gets to the other drive that is constantly used, you can
then wipe it if you have too.

 
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Eric Allen
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      03-31-2010
The Flavored Coffee Guy wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> It's simple, you design the next version of windows to operate on a
> computer with 2 hard drives. Windows resides on one drive, which will
> have the write function turned off, and it writes to the second drive
> for all settings. When you install windows, drivers can be written to
> that drive. But in the design plan is that a mechanical switch will be
> used to turn off the hard drive's ability to be written to by the
> operating system. Eventually, windows would be able to load and start
> faster because of this. This is a really simplified reason but, a flash
> memory card can be planted on the motherboard and serve as the
> installation drive. Then you would take out the flash drive, switch off
> the write function to make it a read only drive.
>
> Then no virus can destroy the operating system. Frankly, it can't
> write to it. If a virus gets to the other drive that is constantly
> used, you can then wipe it if you have too.

..
Wow,,, neat idea

--
--
Eric
 
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Dave Warren
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      04-01-2010
In message <(E-Mail Removed)> "The
Flavored Coffee Guy" <(E-Mail Removed)> was claimed to have wrote:

>Hello,
>
> It's simple, you design the next version of windows to operate on a
>computer with 2 hard drives. Windows resides on one drive, which will have
>the write function turned off, and it writes to the second drive for all
>settings. When you install windows, drivers can be written to that drive.
>But in the design plan is that a mechanical switch will be used to turn off
>the hard drive's ability to be written to by the operating system.
>Eventually, windows would be able to load and start faster because of this.
>This is a really simplified reason but, a flash memory card can be planted
>on the motherboard and serve as the installation drive. Then you would take
>out the flash drive, switch off the write function to make it a read only
>drive.
>
> Then no virus can destroy the operating system. Frankly, it can't write
>to it. If a virus gets to the other drive that is constantly used, you can
>then wipe it if you have too.


How is that any different then using one drive and reinstalling the OS
(or loading the manufacturer's restore image/tool) in the event of an
infection?
 
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The Flavored Coffee Guy
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Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2010

"Dave Warren" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> In message <(E-Mail Removed)> "The
> Flavored Coffee Guy" <(E-Mail Removed)> was claimed to have wrote:
>
>>Hello,
>>
>> It's simple, you design the next version of windows to operate on a
>>computer with 2 hard drives. Windows resides on one drive, which will
>>have
>>the write function turned off, and it writes to the second drive for all
>>settings. When you install windows, drivers can be written to that drive.
>>But in the design plan is that a mechanical switch will be used to turn
>>off
>>the hard drive's ability to be written to by the operating system.
>>Eventually, windows would be able to load and start faster because of
>>this.
>>This is a really simplified reason but, a flash memory card can be planted
>>on the motherboard and serve as the installation drive. Then you would
>>take
>>out the flash drive, switch off the write function to make it a read only
>>drive.
>>
>> Then no virus can destroy the operating system. Frankly, it can't
>> write
>>to it. If a virus gets to the other drive that is constantly used, you
>>can
>>then wipe it if you have too.

>
> How is that any different then using one drive and reinstalling the OS
> (or loading the manufacturer's restore image/tool) in the event of an
> infection?


It wouldn't be if you switched off the ability for the hard drive to be
written to with a mechanical switch. One hard drive would actually have the
write function switched off. Eventually, the whole OS would be loaded to a
flash drive, and when you install it in your system, you'd put windows on
the flash, then your hardware drivers, and open up the computer to move the
jumper to the write off position. Then all of your desktop settings, etc
including volume level, icons, etc are all handled right there on the
read/write drive. So, when a user customizes it, those settings are all on
the drive you can write to. When you install software other than
Windows/the primary OS used to manage your hardware, play sounds, games, run
applications those are all on the writable Drive. If you wanted protected
applications, then you'd probably want those designed the same way. So,
Drive A would be the OS, and you'd turn off the write to that area of the
flash. Then you'd use Drive B for protected applications. Once, they were
installed then you'd switch off the ability to write to drive B. This would
be done in place of Partitioning the Drive and using the MBR. But, it would
include Windows Explorer for file management with graphics, the Desktop and
basic Operating System. Drive B would be Office related software you
wouldn't want anyone to be able to destroy or mess with, so you install the
programs on Drive B, switch off the ability to write to drive B, and then
the files you create are all on Drive C. When you open the programs, a
short cut tells Windows which drive to look at and which directory as well
as which program to load, so it just comes out flash, and only writes to the
drive you desire with the exceptions of the drive that the program was
installed on. So, those programs would never be writing into the same
folders that they were installed into and always another drive.

You'd never need to restore, just reboot.

 
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