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Why hardware designers should switch to Eclipse

 
 
rickman
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      03-23-2010
On Mar 22, 7:36*pm, Eric Smith <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Mar 22, 2:36*pm, "M. Norton" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > On whole I agree with you, however let's be realistic, the learning
> > curve for Emacs is incredibly steep.

>
> A steep learning curve is a Good Thing. *If it was shallow, it would
> take you a very long time to learn it.


I didn't see a smiley at the end of that one... is it possible you are
serious?

Rick
 
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Eric Smith
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      03-23-2010
Think about it. When you graph the learning curve, what are the axes?
 
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Kim Enkovaara
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      03-23-2010
Alan Fitch wrote:
> I also found it seemed slow (probably because I was running it on a slow
> machine): but I've never found vi or emacs feel slow.


You can't find fast enough machine to make eclipse fast. It is always
slow.

--Kim
 
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Petter Gustad
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      03-23-2010
Alan Fitch <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> I find Eclipse baffling, though I wouldn't say I hate it. It seems to
> have weird jargon (what is a perspective?).


Hi Alan,

I've been using Makefiles and Emacs for many years. Using Eclipse I
have to search the hierarchy of perspectives, menus, tabs, etc. to
click a button in order to add -Os to CFLAGS for gcc!

Also I don't like the concept of workspaces which are using files and
directories in a fixed place in the file system (even it it's your
home directory). I like to check out my design (being software or HDL)
from a revision control system anywhere and build it there, which
means using relative pathnames.

Petter
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Philippe
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      03-23-2010
On Mar 23, 9:46*am, Petter Gustad <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Also I don't like the concept of workspaces which are using files and
> directories in a fixed place in the file system (even it it's your
> home directory). I like to check out my design (being software or HDL)
> from a revision control system anywhere and build it there, which
> means using relative pathnames.


Dear Petter,

In Eclipse, you can check out a project in any location at all, and
then point your Eclipse to that location.
While the conventional place to check out projects would be ${HOME}/
workspace/projectname, you can use any other location on your file
system.

kind regards

Philippe
 
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Petter Gustad
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      03-23-2010
Philippe <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> In Eclipse, you can check out a project in any location at all, and
> then point your Eclipse to that location.
> While the conventional place to check out projects would be ${HOME}/
> workspace/projectname, you can use any other location on your file
> system.


But it's not a relative pathname, is it? If you copy it or use it on a
system where the filesystem is mounted elsehere it will fail to find
it.

Petter
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Hendrik
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      03-23-2010
Moving files around within your project is a no-brainer. Sigasi will
even update your Makefile if you wish.
And it is also no problem to move 'projects' around on your computer
(or network). You just have to point Eclipse to the new location.

Hendrik.



On Mar 23, 10:27*am, Petter Gustad <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Philippe <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> > In Eclipse, you can check out a project in any location at all, and
> > then point your Eclipse to that location.
> > While the conventional place to check out projects would be ${HOME}/
> > workspace/projectname, you can use any other location on your file
> > system.

>
> But it's not a relative pathname, is it? If you copy it or use it on a
> system where the filesystem is mounted elsehere it will fail to find
> it.
>
> Petter
> --
> .sig removed by request.


 
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Nial Stewart
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      03-23-2010
> Generally I use nedit and a whole bunch of perl scripts/java apps I've written
> over the years. I'm not totally against eclipse. I use it with the Lattice mico32
> environment for instance.


Similary, I use Textpad with perl scripts and a lot of tool customisation.


> Regarding the Sigasi tool, the price on the website is 'within reason'. What's not
> within reason, IMHO, is the licensing model. If I don't fork out every year it
> will stop working. I would never even look at a tool that I can't get a perpetual
> license for. If I develop a project with it then I want to be able to come back to
> it again in five years if I have to regenerate the project from my archives.


I started looking at Sigasi but stopped experimenting when I found out the price/
licensing model.


Nial






 
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Petter Gustad
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      03-23-2010
Hendrik <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> (or network). You just have to point Eclipse to the new location.


That's one of the things I don't like: absolute pathnames.

In my typical makefile based environment I don't have to change
anything to point to the new location if I should switch back and
forth between computers where the directory is mounted at different
mount points since the paths are all relative.


Pettr
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Marcus Harnisch
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      03-23-2010
Philippe <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> In Eclipse, you can check out a project in any location at all, and
> then point your Eclipse to that location.


Problem is that in Eclipse you don't seem to be able to specify
*project relative* paths for resources (aka project files), except via
user variables which is annoying. All paths are either absolute or
relative to the workspace.

As for the speed, once started up, Eclipse/Win32 runs with decent
performance fast even on my old laptop. Even closing it an restarting
is not too bad. The startup delay is due to the JavaVM I suppose.

I know (former) passionate Eclipse haters who have just switched due
to the impressive speed improvements in recent versions.

Disclaimer: I use Eclipse for certain C development only, so my
opinion might be impacted by behaviour specific to ARM Embedded
Workbench/CDT plugin features.

Regards
Marcus

--
note that "property" can also be used as syntactic sugar to reference
a property, breaking the clean design of verilog; [...]

(seen on http://www.veripool.com/verilog-mode_news.html)
 
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