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Awkward Arithmetic

 
 
rickman
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      03-15-2010
I am converting an integer equation to use numeric_std data types and
it looks rather awkward. Here is the equation...

PhaseStep <= (IntgrPhase + (PROPGAIN * DataCount) + FreqStep) mod
MODULUS;

The names in caps are integer constants, PhaseStep and FreqStep are
unsigned while IntgrPhase and DataCount are signed, all four the same
length, 16 bits. The true range of DataCount will be very limited so
it is invalid that it will cause an overflow of the result. In fact,
it is considered an operational error if any of this causes an
overflow in the result... that is the inputs must have been out of
whack, not the circuit. So I'm not worried about the math at that
level. I'm concerned about how to get the circuit I want without a
lot of difficult typing of syntax.

I just want this stuff to be added to produce a 16 bit result. When
doing this using integer arithmetic it all works well. In simulation
it only barfs if a value exceeds its range and the synthesis result
uses the correct number of bits in the implementation. I don't see it
using any extra bits in the calculations which makes sense, why
calculate bits you aren't using in the end?

To add the signed and unsigned values, I believe I will have to add a
bit to the unsigned FreqStep before adding to the signed values. The
significant bits will not flow into the added bit, so it can be
dropped in the end. But this will complicate the result a lot.

PhaseStep <= resize(unsigned(IntgrPhase + (PROPGAIN * DataCount) +
signed(resize(FreqStep,STEPWIDTH+1)) mod MODULUS), STEPWIDTH);

Am I making this more complicated than it needs to be? If I just
convert FreqStep to signed without the resize, it will treat the msb
as a sign bit and corrupt the value, right? I guess the fact that I
call it a signed value doesn't change the circuit, but it will change
the simulation, right?

The other thing I could do is to convert them all to integer and then
back, but that is no less messy.

Any ideas on a way to make this expression simpler?

Rick
 
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glen herrmannsfeldt
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      03-15-2010
In comp.arch.fpga rickman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I am converting an integer equation to use numeric_std data types and
> it looks rather awkward. Here is the equation...


> PhaseStep <= (IntgrPhase + (PROPGAIN * DataCount) + FreqStep) mod
> MODULUS;


> The names in caps are integer constants, PhaseStep and FreqStep are
> unsigned while IntgrPhase and DataCount are signed, all four the same
> length, 16 bits. The true range of DataCount will be very limited so
> it is invalid that it will cause an overflow of the result.


How big can the values be? The result can't overflow because
of the MOD. (It can't exceed MODULUS-1), but multiplying two
16 bit integers can reach 32 or so (signed or unsigned?) bits.

> In fact,
> it is considered an operational error if any of this causes an
> overflow in the result... that is the inputs must have been out of
> whack, not the circuit. So I'm not worried about the math at that
> level. I'm concerned about how to get the circuit I want without a
> lot of difficult typing of syntax.


If DataCount can't get so big, then a lookup table based on the
constant PROPGAIN would be easy and fast. That is, do:

PhaseStep <= (IntgrPhase + ((PROPGAIN * DataCount)mod MODULUS) + FreqStep)
mod MODULUS;

Then, depending on the size of IntgrPhase and FreqStep, another
table or some simple adder logic could do the second modulus.

It is somewhat easier if MODULUS is a power of two, but you can
still do it even if it isn't. Another possibility so to multiply
DataCount by an appropriately scaled PROPGAIN such that a power of
two modulus can be used, then multply the result to get the correct
MODULUS. You have to be careful with rounding, but I believe
that can be done. Doing division by multiplication with an
appropriately scaled reciprocal is common, and the rounding is
well understood. It isn't quite as obvious for mod, but I believe
it can still be done. (The latter assumes you have hardware
multipliers available, as many current FPGAs have.)

-- glen
 
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Andy
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      03-15-2010
This may be a silly question, but why do you need to convert it to
signed/unsigned? If it works in integer, leave it be... The simulation
will be much faster, and the circuit just as good. Glen sounds like
he's got some good implementation ideas, but if you're primarily
interested in expressing the problem in a simple readable way, integer
types are the clear winner. This is one of those golden examples of
why I like integers so much!

Or do you want it to be scalable to > 31 bits? That would be an
example of why I want integer to be bigger!

Andy
 
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rickman
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      03-15-2010
On Mar 15, 6:12*pm, Andy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> This may be a silly question, but why do you need to convert it to
> signed/unsigned? If it works in integer, leave it be... The simulation
> will be much faster, and the circuit just as good. Glen sounds like
> he's got some good implementation ideas, but if you're primarily
> interested in expressing the problem in a simple readable way, integer
> types are the clear winner. This is one of those golden examples of
> why I like integers so much!
>
> Or do you want it to be scalable to > 31 bits? That would be an
> example of why I want integer to be bigger!
>
> Andy


Thanks for the reply.

No, I don't need > 31 bits. I just am using this in a case where all
the connecting signals are signed/unsigned rather than integer. The
various parameters are just shifting factors rather than arbitrary
scale factors. In the integer approach I used a multiplication while
a shift might be more appropriate with a vector although I think the
impact is more clear using the multiply. After all, it is
implementing a formula...

The issue is not if my math is good. The only question I have is
whether there is a better way to express it in VHDL.

BTW, I think I need parens around the stuff the mod is acting on, if
nothing else a bit more clarity...

Rick
 
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Andy
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      03-16-2010
Though it won't help with signed/unsigned issues, you may also want to
look at the fixed point package. It automatically promotes result
sizes to maintain accuracy for multiplication, addision and
subtraction. You can use it for "integer" math by simply specifying
your LSB index at 0. The idea is that intermediate result or operand
resizing is not usually needed with fixed point, just a final resize
prior to storage (like the implied resize that happens with integers).

I really wish they had gone the extra step to make ufixed - ufixed =
sfixed, but alas, that did not happen (not that it would be an issue
in your problem). With that, we'd have 99% of the flexibility of
integers (automatic signed and size promotion), with virtually
unlimited data sizes, at reduced simulation performance (compared to
integer, not signed/unsigned).
Andy
 
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rickman
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      03-17-2010
On Mar 16, 9:04*am, Andy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Though it won't help with signed/unsigned issues, you may also want to
> look at the fixed point package. It automatically promotes result
> sizes to maintain accuracy for multiplication, addision and
> subtraction. You can use it for "integer" math by simply specifying
> your LSB index at 0. The idea is that intermediate result or operand
> resizing is not usually needed with fixed point, just a final resize
> prior to storage (like the implied resize that happens with integers).
>
> I really wish they had gone the extra step to make ufixed - ufixed =
> sfixed, but alas, that did not happen (not that it would be an issue
> in your problem). With that, we'd have 99% of the flexibility of
> integers (automatic signed and size promotion), with virtually
> unlimited data sizes, at reduced simulation performance (compared to
> integer, not signed/unsigned).
> Andy


Actually, after converting the calculation to signed/unsigned types,
it was still pretty groady, so I changed it back to integer and split
it up. I need to optimize this design for size and I find that easier
if I separate the arithmetic functions so I can more easily see how
they are being implemented.

I had originally used integer because it make the calculations easy,
but doubted that this was the best way to express the calculations
because of the mess of converting the inputs from signed/unsigned and
back. As it turned out mixing signed and unsigned is still pretty
messy.

Rick
 
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jacko
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      03-17-2010
Looks like a phase controlled DCO. Maybe the frequency/phase d/dt fm
effect can be used? It does look messy, modulus if its a power of 2
should be easy to remove by a (x downto y) subrange select. If modulus
is n/(n-1) then consider MASH or bitstream delta sigma. OR use a fixed
point overflow clock gating. Has anyone ever tried n/(n-2) via up/down
clock gating of an n divider??

Cheers Jacko
 
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rickman
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      03-19-2010
On Mar 17, 11:33*am, jacko <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Looks like a phase controlled DCO. Maybe the frequency/phase d/dt fm
> effect can be used? It does look messy, modulus if its a power of 2
> should be easy to remove by a (x downto y) subrange select. If modulus
> is n/(n-1) then consider MASH or bitstream delta sigma. OR use a fixed
> point overflow clock gating. Has anyone ever tried n/(n-2) via up/down
> clock gating of an n divider??
>
> Cheers Jacko


Gating (or enabling actually) a divider to adjust a clock rate will
give you the average rate you need, but it results in a jitter about
equal to the output clock period, i.e. 100%. Using a DCO results in
an output jitter equal to one reference clock period.

In my DCO the modulus is a power of two and there is no need to do
anything with the range. When the counter reaches its max count of
2^n-1 it just naturally overflows, as does unsigned arithmetic in
numeric_std. But integer arithmetic doesn't, so I have to use the mod
operator.

If you want a modulus that isn't a power of 2, you can build the
counter so it loads modulus-1 and counts down giving a carry out at
0. I knew I had no need to use a modulus that wasn't a power of two,
so I wrote the code without considering that.

Rick
 
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jacko
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      03-22-2010
True. Reducing jitter does need a higher clock speed. and a stable
power supply.
 
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rickman
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      03-22-2010
On Mar 22, 8:23*am, jacko <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> True. Reducing jitter does need a higher clock speed. and a stable
> power supply.


Yes, without that stable power supply, your lsbs might get lost in the
digital noise...

what???

Rick
 
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