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That’s Why They Call It “Dimdows”

 
 
Lawrence D'Oliveiro
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      02-17-2010
A simple principle we learned back in undergrad Comp Sci: keep code and data
separate. Yet it’s something that Windows makes essentially impossible to
do. Viz <http://blogs.zdnet.com/igeneration/?p=4127>:

The upgrading process was not particularly easy with hundreds of
gigabytes of data to back up and keep safe; granted Windows Restore did
the job nicely with a separate backup on an external drive. However, the
stress is very much worthwhile ...

Why do you need to suffer “stress”? Why do you need a special tool to keep
your data safe? Doesn’t the OS know how to keep the OS separate from user
data? Users of well-designed OSes take this sort of thing for granted.

Dimdows sufferers, on the other hand...
 
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Matty F
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      02-18-2010
On Feb 17, 8:36 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
> A simple principle we learned back in undergrad Comp Sci: keep code and data
> separate. Yet its something that Windows makes essentially impossible to
> do. Viz <http://blogs.zdnet.com/igeneration/?p=4127>:
>
> The upgrading process was not particularly easy with hundreds of
> gigabytes of data to back up and keep safe; granted Windows Restore did
> the job nicely with a separate backup on an external drive. However, the
> stress is very much worthwhile ...
>
> Why do you need to suffer stress? Why do you need a special tool to keep
> your data safe? Doesnt the OS know how to keep the OS separate from user
> data? Users of well-designed OSes take this sort of thing for granted.
>
> Dimdows sufferers, on the other hand...


Surely there should be at least three levels: the operating system and
its data, executable programs, and data.
 
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Matty F
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      02-18-2010
On Feb 18, 4:17 pm, "geoff" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Matty F wrote:
> > On Feb 17, 8:36 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
> > central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
> >> A simple principle we learned back in undergrad Comp Sci: keep code
> >> and data separate. Yet its something that Windows makes essentially
> >> impossible to do. Viz <http://blogs.zdnet.com/igeneration/?p=4127>:

>
> >> The upgrading process was not particularly easy with hundreds of
> >> gigabytes of data to back up and keep safe; granted Windows
> >> Restore did the job nicely with a separate backup on an external
> >> drive. However, the stress is very much worthwhile ...

>
> >> Why do you need to suffer stress? Why do you need a special tool
> >> to keep your data safe? Doesnt the OS know how to keep the OS
> >> separate from user data? Users of well-designed OSes take this sort
> >> of thing for granted.

>
> >> Dimdows sufferers, on the other hand...

>
> > Surely there should be at least three levels: the operating system and
> > its data, executable programs, and data.

>
> There pretty much are. Except where applications or users explicitly and
> deliberately go against the conventions.


I've used an OS which terminated any application that attempted to
change the OS or program files.
The Windows system I have here allows crappy viruses to change program
or system files. So that's not good enough.
 
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Matty F
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      02-18-2010
On Feb 19, 9:41 am, "geoff" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Matty F wrote:
>
> > I've used an OS which terminated any application that attempted to
> > change the OS or program files.
> > The Windows system I have here allows crappy viruses to change program
> > or system files. So that's not good enough.

>
> I suggest you install some protection then. It's pretty routine.
>


I'm not having any problems. I have a firewall that does a checksum of
every application accessing the net.
But why doesn't Windows have built-in protection? It should be easy
enough.
 
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Lawrence D'Oliveiro
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      02-19-2010
In message <(E-Mail Removed)>, Matty F wrote:

> But why doesn't Windows have built-in protection? It should be easy
> enough.


Because it wasn’t designed to be secure to begin with. It was designed to
allow apps to do whatever they liked, in the name of ‘enhancing the user
experience”, and now it’s impossible to reign them back in. Vista UAC
provoked so many complaints that Microsoft had to water it down in Seven. So
essentially they have admitted what everyone else knew; that the platform is
fundamentally unsalvageable.
 
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