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Business VoIP provider?

 
 
Mr Benn
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      01-27-2010
I'm in the process of setting up broadband and telephony services for a
company I work for. We are considering using VoIP as an alternative to
using an ISDN30 connection for telephony and using a 5 - 10 Mb/s uncontended
symmetrical broadband connection for routing the VoIP as well as for general
Internet access.

I'm now looking for companies who offer a managed VoIP connection which will
offer a good QoS guarantee. Having had no previous experience of this task,
does anyone have any recommendations for providers? One I am considering is
Andrews & Arnold who I understand have a good reputation for broadband and
also offer a VoIP service.

Are there any others worth considering?

Anything to watch out for?


 
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alexd
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      01-27-2010
Meanwhile, at the uk.telecom.voip Job Justification Hearings, Mr Benn chose
the tried and tested strategy of:

> I'm in the process of setting up broadband and telephony services for a
> company I work for. We are considering using VoIP as an alternative to
> using an ISDN30 connection for telephony and using a 5 - 10 Mb/s
> uncontended symmetrical broadband connection for routing the VoIP as well
> as for general Internet access.
>
> I'm now looking for companies who offer a managed VoIP connection which
> will offer a good QoS guarantee.


Sounds a bit like ISDN

> Having had no previous experience of this task, does anyone have any
> recommendations for providers?


BTnet 10Mbps is free install if you agree to a 3-5 year sentence and you've
got "suitable spare line plant ... at the Customer site" [presumably fibre],
and I believe they offer a latency SLA. A couple of customers have this and
I've never known either of them go offline.

> Anything to watch out for?


Yes. If you haven't done this before, pretty much everything.

--
<http://ale.cx/> (AIM:troffasky) ((E-Mail Removed))
20:34:00 up 6 days, 23:35, 5 users, load average: 0.04, 0.04, 0.01
DIMENSION-CONTROLLING FORT DOH HAS NOW BEEN DEMOLISHED,
AND TIME STARTED FLOWING REVERSELY

 
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Gordon Henderson
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      01-27-2010
In article <hjpdgv$pjk$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org>,
Mr Benn <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>I'm in the process of setting up broadband and telephony services for a
>company I work for. We are considering using VoIP as an alternative to
>using an ISDN30 connection for telephony and using a 5 - 10 Mb/s uncontended
>symmetrical broadband connection for routing the VoIP as well as for general
>Internet access.


How many people, but more importantly, how many concurrent phone calls
do you expect to make/take?

An ISDN30 is up to 30 channels - usually satarting with 8.

For VoIP bandwidth, use 80Kb/sec each way per concurrent call to work
out the bandwidth required.

So for 10 concurrent calls, 800Kb/sec each way is needed - which will
almost fit into a good business class ADSL line. You'll fit 2-3 times
that if you use compression such as G.729.

There is a whole branch of statistical analysis you can use to work
out the number of channels you'll need - but you may already know this,
but it often depends on what the company does. I've seen offices of over
100 staff use less than 8 channels, but a call centre with 20 staff will
use 20 channels all the time...

If you're after a leased line, 10Mb "Metro Ethernet" or whatever it's
called these days is the thing, you need to find an ISP that can provide
both the line and the bandwidth over it, although what will typically
happen is that the ISP will hand-off the physical line part to BT
or another big telco type company who can handle that side of things,
(eg. NTL/Telewest, C&W, etc.) but the line would be dedicated from your
premises to somewhere in the ISPs network. One thing to ask is what the
contention ratio is inside the ISPs network. Good ones don't have any
for their leased line customers....

>I'm now looking for companies who offer a managed VoIP connection which will
>offer a good QoS guarantee. Having had no previous experience of this task,
>does anyone have any recommendations for providers? One I am considering is
>Andrews & Arnold who I understand have a good reputation for broadband and
>also offer a VoIP service.


If the ISP has control over both ends of the link, then QoS can be
implemented to separate VoIP from general office data, however if the
ISP doesn't supply VoIP services, then your VoIP data is going to be at
the mercy of the public internet when it leaves the ISP until it reaches
the ITSP. Fortunately that step of the path should generally be fine. At
least that's my experiences of it.

I've used HNS in Bristol (http://www.hns.net/) to get 10Mb lines, but
there are many others.

>Are there any others worth considering?
>
>Anything to watch out for?


As Alex said: "everything".

I'd be tempted to run a separate broadband line for VoIP, but a lot will
depend on the number of concurrent calls - even then, if it's a mix of
incoming and outgoing, 2 ADSL lines can work well, and I have customers
with this sort of setups. (one has 3 ADSL lines - one for incoming calls,
one for outgoung and one for general office data)

Then you need the PBX, Phones, internal wiring and so on...

Good luck!

Gordon
 
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Woody
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      01-28-2010
Most people seem to suggest Andrews and Arnold for business use.



--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com


 
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alexd
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      01-28-2010
Meanwhile, at the uk.telecom.voip Job Justification Hearings, Gordon
Henderson chose the tried and tested strategy of:

> I'd be tempted to run a separate broadband line for VoIP, but a lot will
> depend on the number of concurrent calls - even then, if it's a mix of
> incoming and outgoing, 2 ADSL lines can work well, and I have customers
> with this sort of setups. (one has 3 ADSL lines - one for incoming calls,
> one for outgoung and one for general office data)
>
> Then you need the PBX, Phones, internal wiring and so on...


How about this as a starting point: get ADSL2+ or Max Premium from a
business ISP, and demo a few handsets on it for a few users. Get a feel for
what features are available and what the reliability is like, and an idea if
you want to go 100% hosted, or have a local phone system. Once you're happy
with that, then think about expensive internet connections with their
attendant availability guarantees.

If you've got a local phone system already, you can migrate users over
piecemeal by putting the replacement phone system in a 'man-in-the-middle'
configuration between the old PBX and the ISDN30 it's in. Any decent
replacement PBX will let you do this. This will also magically add VoIP
capability to the old PBX[*].

A bit of time and money spent now demoing any potential solution should
ensure longevity and compatibility with your business.

--
<http://ale.cx/> (AIM:troffasky) ((E-Mail Removed))
23:39:58 up 8 days, 2:41, 5 users, load average: 2.89, 2.23, 1.82
DIMENSION-CONTROLLING FORT DOH HAS NOW BEEN DEMOLISHED,
AND TIME STARTED FLOWING REVERSELY
[*] Some assembly required.
 
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Mr Benn
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      01-29-2010

"R. Mark Clayton" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Mr Benn" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:hjpdgv$pjk$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org...
>> I'm in the process of setting up broadband and telephony services for a
>> company I work for. We are considering using VoIP as an alternative to
>> using an ISDN30 connection for telephony and using a 5 - 10 Mb/s
>> uncontended symmetrical broadband connection for routing the VoIP as well
>> as for general Internet access.
>>
>> I'm now looking for companies who offer a managed VoIP connection which
>> will offer a good QoS guarantee. Having had no previous experience of
>> this task, does anyone have any recommendations for providers? One I am
>> considering is Andrews & Arnold who I understand have a good reputation
>> for broadband and also offer a VoIP service.
>>
>> Are there any others worth considering?
>>
>> Anything to watch out for?
>>

>
> BT are about to offer business broadband using fibre to the cabinet with
> 40Mbs down and 5Mbs up - more than enough for 30 lines. Try and find out
> when it will roll out where you are.


I'm meeting with BT on Monday. Will ask them about that.


 
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Mr Benn
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      02-02-2010
"Mr Benn" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:hjv3lk$iv1$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org...
>
> "R. Mark Clayton" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...


>> BT are about to offer business broadband using fibre to the cabinet with
>> 40Mbs down and 5Mbs up - more than enough for 30 lines. Try and find out
>> when it will roll out where you are.

>
> I'm meeting with BT on Monday. Will ask them about that.


They didn't know specifically about that but were keen on selling me a MPLS
service to a remote location which I suspect is going to be very expensive.

I need a fibre link anyway for ISDN30 and leased ethernet.


 
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Gordon Henderson
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      02-02-2010
In article <hk94fs$mg4$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org>,
Mr Benn <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>"Mr Benn" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:hjv3lk$iv1$(E-Mail Removed)-september.org...
>>
>> "R. Mark Clayton" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...

>
>>> BT are about to offer business broadband using fibre to the cabinet with
>>> 40Mbs down and 5Mbs up - more than enough for 30 lines. Try and find out
>>> when it will roll out where you are.

>>
>> I'm meeting with BT on Monday. Will ask them about that.

>
>They didn't know specifically about that but were keen on selling me a MPLS
>service to a remote location which I suspect is going to be very expensive.


If you are connecting multiple buildings together which are geographically
distant, then MPLS *may* be a cost effective way to do it, or it may
not. There are other ways to do it.

If you just want a 10Mb Internet connection, then go to an Internet
company who specialise in leased line connectivity. (and BT is just one
of dozens of such companies). Let them deal with BT, or whatever fibre
carrier they use - there are many, and you really don't need to concern
yourself with the physical side of things - unless you really want to.

>I need a fibre link anyway for ISDN30 and leased ethernet.


ISDN30 runs perfectly well over copper, but BT don't seem to want to do
it that way anymore...

Give us some more details of what it is you're after - sounds like a
small/medium business who wants to use VoIP (at least internally, and
possible externally too) who also want a high-speed Internet connection...

Gordon
 
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