Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Computer Support > mythbusting dorks strike again with wild wisdom!

Reply
Thread Tools

mythbusting dorks strike again with wild wisdom!

 
 
richard
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2009
The discovery channel airs a program called "mythbusters" which
investigates the reality of myths. The two hosts, who claim to have 30
years of experience as dunce, uh I mean stunt, men, some times leaves me
wondering of their honesty. And intelligence.

So on tonight's show the two clowns are jumping into a dumpster ?
OH please. Like this scene is so old it's pathetic. I mean like these guys
never did this as stunt guys before? Yeah right.

So off to go stunt school they go? Huh? "We're professionals. We have
experience!". At what?
Like I've seen people jump out of helicopters onto airbags from 200 feet or
more. The show wastes over 10 minutes of time of them looking around at
various materials found in dumpsters. Like who cares?

Ok so finally it comes time for them to actually jump. Onto an airbag from
a mere 13 feet. Hell, I used to do that as a kid.

They routinely their assistant "dummy" and hook him up with all kinds of
gadgets. The one host concludes from the data, "From a 20 foot fall you
would generate 11.4g's..........".

WHHHHHHAAAAAAAAAATTTTTTTTTTTTTT?

Yes sir, that is what he said. 11 point 4 gees.
Can we say HORSEHOCKEY?

A roller coaster ride falling from 200 feet only produces at the most, 3
gees. A jet fighter pilot has to wear a gee suit to combat a mere 7 gees.

Now don't get me wrong, the show is mostly entertaining and educational.
It's just that sometimes these two dorks get things totally wrong.

If you must know, a "g" is the force applied against your body during
certain events. 1g is normal. 2g means it takes twice as much force from
your body to do the same work. 11 point 4g? Hell, you could barely move.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
richard
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2009
On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 19:33:06 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:

> On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 20:14:47 -0700, richard <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>>The discovery channel airs a program called "mythbusters" which
>>investigates the reality of myths. The two hosts, who claim to have 30
>>years of experience as dunce, uh I mean stunt, men, some times leaves me
>>wondering of their honesty. And intelligence.

>
> With you, there's no doubt about your honesty. Or intelligence.
>
>>Ok so finally it comes time for them to actually jump. Onto an airbag from
>>a mere 13 feet. Hell, I used to do that as a kid.

>
> Ahh. Brain injury. Explains a lot.
>
>>They routinely their assistant "dummy"

>
> Huh?
>
>>A roller coaster ride falling from 200 feet only produces at the most, 3
>>gees.

>
> You sounded a bit more believable when you called it G. Now, you call
> it gee. Destroys all credibility.
>
> Roller coasters can generate close to 7 g's.
>
>>A jet fighter pilot has to wear a gee suit to combat a mere 7 gees.

>
> Generally a G-suit is used for anything above 5g's for any extended
> period of time.
>
>
>>Now don't get me wrong, the show is mostly entertaining and educational.
>>It's just that sometimes these two dorks get things totally wrong.

>
> Unlike you, who always get things totally wrong.
>
>>If you must know, a "g" is the force applied against your body during
>>certain events.

>
> Holy crap. Wow... Just... Wow.
>
>>1g is normal. 2g means it takes twice as much force from
>>your body to do the same work. 11 point 4g? Hell, you could barely move.

>
> Do some reading. Please.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-force


I do not rely on the wikipedia for factual information.

What people refer to as a "G" force when applied to roller coaster riding,
is not actual fact. 7G on a coaster? Prove it. Scientifically.

If the fall produced 11.4G from a mere 20 feet, then a parachutist falling
from a plane at 10,000 feet, at a speed of 120mph, would not be able to
pull his rip cord. Let alone survive the jump.



 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Mike Easter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2009
richard wrote:
<mythbuster TV show about dumpster diving>

disclaimer: I didn't see the show. I had to go look up what it showed
and said.

What I read: they dropped a dummy into a cushioned dumpster from 20
feet to generate shock force and measure it with an accelerometer (idea
triggered from some show stunt)

Math: when you - the dummy - are falling, our 1g gravity is affecting
you and accelerating you at 1g for a short time, so you gain speed by
the force of gravity.

When you stop (suddenly), the dummy's accelerometer measures the shock
forces exerted on you in g. Thus, if your total body stops in the
tiniest instant, such as if a dummy were hurled at a brick wall at that
speed, the g forces would be much greater over the extremely short
stopping distance and time than if your body's stoppage were 'cushioned'
so that the stopping force could be spread out over several instances -
fractional milliseconds - and cushion distances.

What I read about the mythbuster episode said that the design of the
cushion - professional airbag - was supposed to be able to handle 11.4
g/s, but I don't know exactly what that 'means' contrasted with shock
forces or 'jerk' of stopping as described in the wikipedia, but I do
understand (what it means) that the dummy experienced 9.9 g/s shock
force according to its accelerometer.

The wiki talks about short g-force durations and 'jerk' in its article.
It (also) says that Indy car drivers have survived 'shock' or 'jerk' of
over 100 g in crashes.

Even if you aren't going very fast, if your stop is abrupt, some g
forces are going to be registered on your accelerometer. How many
depends on how your stop is cushioned. 9.9 g/s in this shock/jerk/
context aren't actually very many (or for very long), whereas it is a
fair amount of trouble to generate sustained 10 g/s in something like a
centrifuge.


--
Mike Easter

 
Reply With Quote
 
Mike Easter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2009
~BD~ wrote:
> Mike Easter wrote:


> I expect you've seen this item before, Mike, but it does support your
> thinking!
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4q35xHzjxB0


I don't actually want to watch another video. I'm not a video kinda
guy. When I wanted to research this mythbuster issue, the 'net was
'full of' mythbuster videos which I had to 'climb over' to find out what
was really going on.

I would rather read an article about whatever point you want to make.
Find one of those and select your sentence/point from that article.



--
Mike Easter

 
Reply With Quote
 
Aardvark
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2009
On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 20:43:49 -0700, richard wrote:

> If the fall produced 11.4G from a mere 20 feet, then a parachutist falling
> from a plane at 10,000 feet, at a speed of 120mph, would not be able to
> pull his rip cord. Let alone survive the jump.


It didn't cross your mind, of course, that the 11.4G was, in fact, the
maximum gravitational force measured and that level of force was only
maintained for a fraction of a second at the moment of impact?

Of course it didn't, sto0pid.

During any free fall, the force acting on the object falling is only ever
1G. Depending on the speed of the body on impact, the G-force it
experiences could be extremely high.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Aardvark
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2009
On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 19:33:06 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:

> On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 20:14:47 -0700, richard <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>>The discovery channel airs a program called "mythbusters" which
>>investigates the reality of myths. The two hosts, who claim to have 30
>>years of experience as dunce, uh I mean stunt, men, some times leaves me
>>wondering of their honesty. And intelligence.

>
> With you, there's no doubt about your honesty. Or intelligence.
>
>>Ok so finally it comes time for them to actually jump. Onto an airbag from
>>a mere 13 feet. Hell, I used to do that as a kid.

>
> Ahh. Brain injury. Explains a lot.
>
>>They routinely their assistant "dummy"

>
> Huh?
>
>>A roller coaster ride falling from 200 feet only produces at the most, 3
>>gees.

>
> You sounded a bit more believable when you called it G. Now, you call
> it gee. Destroys all credibility.
>
> Roller coasters can generate close to 7 g's.
>
>>A jet fighter pilot has to wear a gee suit to combat a mere 7 gees.

>
> Generally a G-suit is used for anything above 5g's for any extended
> period of time.
>
>
>>Now don't get me wrong, the show is mostly entertaining and educational.
>>It's just that sometimes these two dorks get things totally wrong.

>
> Unlike you, who always get things totally wrong.
>
>>If you must know, a "g" is the force applied against your body during
>>certain events.

>
> Holy crap. Wow... Just... Wow.
>
>>1g is normal. 2g means it takes twice as much force from
>>your body to do the same work. 11 point 4g? Hell, you could barely move.

>
> Do some reading. Please.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-force


Why does he persist in watching that programme when he obviously doesn't
have the education or intellectual wherewithal to understand the scientific
principles they sometimes deal with?
 
Reply With Quote
 
Desk Rabbit
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2009
richard wrote:
> On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 19:33:06 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:
>
>> On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 20:14:47 -0700, richard <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> The discovery channel airs a program called "mythbusters" which
>>> investigates the reality of myths. The two hosts, who claim to have 30
>>> years of experience as dunce, uh I mean stunt, men, some times leaves me
>>> wondering of their honesty. And intelligence.

>> With you, there's no doubt about your honesty. Or intelligence.
>>
>>> Ok so finally it comes time for them to actually jump. Onto an airbag from
>>> a mere 13 feet. Hell, I used to do that as a kid.

>> Ahh. Brain injury. Explains a lot.
>>
>>> They routinely their assistant "dummy"

>> Huh?
>>
>>> A roller coaster ride falling from 200 feet only produces at the most, 3
>>> gees.

>> You sounded a bit more believable when you called it G. Now, you call
>> it gee. Destroys all credibility.
>>
>> Roller coasters can generate close to 7 g's.
>>
>>> A jet fighter pilot has to wear a gee suit to combat a mere 7 gees.

>> Generally a G-suit is used for anything above 5g's for any extended
>> period of time.
>>
>>
>>> Now don't get me wrong, the show is mostly entertaining and educational.
>>> It's just that sometimes these two dorks get things totally wrong.

>> Unlike you, who always get things totally wrong.
>>
>>> If you must know, a "g" is the force applied against your body during
>>> certain events.

>> Holy crap. Wow... Just... Wow.
>>
>>> 1g is normal. 2g means it takes twice as much force from
>>> your body to do the same work. 11 point 4g? Hell, you could barely move.

>> Do some reading. Please.
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-force

>
> I do not rely on the wikipedia for factual information.
>
> What people refer to as a "G" force when applied to roller coaster riding,
> is not actual fact. 7G on a coaster? Prove it. Scientifically.
>
> If the fall produced 11.4G from a mere 20 feet, then a parachutist falling
> from a plane at 10,000 feet, at a speed of 120mph, would not be able to
> pull his rip cord. Let alone survive the jump.


Go and research the term "Terminal Velocity" and then come back and
apologies to everybody in the world for your stupidity.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Desk Rabbit
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2009
richard wrote:
> On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 19:33:06 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:
>
>> On Wed, 25 Nov 2009 20:14:47 -0700, richard <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> The discovery channel airs a program called "mythbusters" which
>>> investigates the reality of myths. The two hosts, who claim to have 30
>>> years of experience as dunce, uh I mean stunt, men, some times leaves me
>>> wondering of their honesty. And intelligence.

>> With you, there's no doubt about your honesty. Or intelligence.
>>
>>> Ok so finally it comes time for them to actually jump. Onto an airbag from
>>> a mere 13 feet. Hell, I used to do that as a kid.

>> Ahh. Brain injury. Explains a lot.
>>
>>> They routinely their assistant "dummy"

>> Huh?
>>
>>> A roller coaster ride falling from 200 feet only produces at the most, 3
>>> gees.

>> You sounded a bit more believable when you called it G. Now, you call
>> it gee. Destroys all credibility.
>>
>> Roller coasters can generate close to 7 g's.
>>
>>> A jet fighter pilot has to wear a gee suit to combat a mere 7 gees.

>> Generally a G-suit is used for anything above 5g's for any extended
>> period of time.
>>
>>
>>> Now don't get me wrong, the show is mostly entertaining and educational.
>>> It's just that sometimes these two dorks get things totally wrong.

>> Unlike you, who always get things totally wrong.
>>
>>> If you must know, a "g" is the force applied against your body during
>>> certain events.

>> Holy crap. Wow... Just... Wow.
>>
>>> 1g is normal. 2g means it takes twice as much force from
>>> your body to do the same work. 11 point 4g? Hell, you could barely move.

>> Do some reading. Please.
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-force

>
> I do not rely on the wikipedia for factual information.
>
> What people refer to as a "G" force when applied to roller coaster riding,
> is not actual fact. 7G on a coaster? Prove it. Scientifically.
>
> If the fall produced 11.4G from a mere 20 feet, then a parachutist falling
> from a plane at 10,000 feet, at a speed of 120mph, would not be able to
> pull his rip cord. Let alone survive the jump.
>
>
>

Read this and educate yourself (Hopefully)
http://hypertextbook.com/facts/JianHuang.shtml
 
Reply With Quote
 
Aardvark
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2009
On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 09:22:24 -0600, §nühw€£f wrote:

>> Why does he persist in watching that programme when he obviously
>> doesn't have the education or intellectual wherewithal to understand
>> the scientific principles they sometimes deal with?
>>
>>

> Inability to self-assess ones shortcomings? Yeah, that would be it.


"A man's gotta know his limitations"- 'Dirty' Harry Callahan in 'The Dead
Pool'.





--
Some kill their love when they are young, And some when they are old;
Some strangle with the hands of Lust, Some with the hands of Gold:
The kindest use a knife, because The dead so soon grow cold -
OSCAR WILDE (1854-1900) 'The Ballad of Reading Gaol'
 
Reply With Quote
 
Mike Easter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2009
Aardvark wrote:

> "A man's gotta know his limitations"- 'Dirty' Harry Callahan in 'The
> Dead Pool'.


DeadPool was a DirtyHarry, the last, but Magnum Force, the second, is
the one generally credited with the limitations line.

You would think that he would say it again in the 5th in the series,
since it was so popular coming in the 2nd, just for fan appeal.


--
Mike Easter

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Writers strike is over, but a new strike is on the horizon. richard Computer Support 0 05-08-2008 12:39 AM
The Wild Wild West fredman DVD Video 6 03-04-2006 04:21 PM
Wild Wild West in R1? Kishin DVD Video 1 07-11-2005 06:16 PM
looking for CH Wild Wild West discs... Darrel Christenson DVD Video 0 11-26-2004 10:23 PM
Lynne Cheney's Wild, Wild West =?iso-8859-1?Q?=B1?= Digital Photography 6 08-16-2004 07:26 AM



Advertisments