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Calibrating monitor

 
 
ransley
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      11-23-2009
I have a good Lcd, what system is recomended, I see several products
of different price ranges, are cheap ones inferior or lacking.
 
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Richard
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      11-23-2009

"ransley" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>I have a good Lcd, what system is recomended, I see several products
> of different price ranges, are cheap ones inferior or lacking.


Can only speak for the one I use:
http://www.xrite.com/product_overview.aspx?ID=788
I am satisfied with the colours between my CRT and two notebooks after using
it.

Richard



 
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ransley
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      11-23-2009
On Nov 23, 11:02*am, "igotsaurus" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> It is easy to calibrate for color, difficult to calibrate for accurate
> WYSIWYG printing. Any device, from the Huey on up the price chain, will
> calibrate color quite accurately.
>
> The problem with calibrating LCD monitors is that except for high end
> graphics panels it is very difficult to tone down screen brightness so that
> you can still adequately see shadow detail but prints will match the screen
> in terms of brightness values., the dreaded dark print conundrum. If your
> LCD is too bright, as 99% of them are, paradoxically your color managed
> prints will be way too dark.
>
> I suggest that if you use a Spyder or other equivalent that allows you to
> calibrate for a target brightness level you aim for a screen brightness less
> than 100 by gradually turning down brightness and contrast, the latter being
> the more powerful controller of actual LCD screen brightness. You have to
> ignore the misleading instructions about visually evaluating the black and
> gray ramps in the calibration program and focus on overall luminance. LED
> peripherally back lit panels may well show central dimming at these
> illumination levels and may be worse for accurate printing than less costly
> fluorescent backlit panels. Your monitor should also allow RGB adjustments.
>
> It is best to calibrate and print off a screen in a moderately lit
> environment, understanding that ambient lighting may also fool your eyes
> when you evaluate your prints. If you are anal compulsive you will be
> creating a hood for your monitor as well.


My issue is my prints are to light, I must darken them so its hard to
see them on screen, when I brighten the screen surrounding white areas
of the program are hard on my eyes they are so bright. My color is
good.
 
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Bob Williams
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      11-23-2009
ransley wrote:
> On Nov 23, 11:02 am, "igotsaurus" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> It is easy to calibrate for color, difficult to calibrate for accurate
>> WYSIWYG printing. Any device, from the Huey on up the price chain, will
>> calibrate color quite accurately.
>>
>> The problem with calibrating LCD monitors is that except for high end
>> graphics panels it is very difficult to tone down screen brightness so that
>> you can still adequately see shadow detail but prints will match the screen
>> in terms of brightness values., the dreaded dark print conundrum. If your
>> LCD is too bright, as 99% of them are, paradoxically your color managed
>> prints will be way too dark.
>>
>> I suggest that if you use a Spyder or other equivalent that allows you to
>> calibrate for a target brightness level you aim for a screen brightness less
>> than 100 by gradually turning down brightness and contrast, the latter being
>> the more powerful controller of actual LCD screen brightness. You have to
>> ignore the misleading instructions about visually evaluating the black and
>> gray ramps in the calibration program and focus on overall luminance. LED
>> peripherally back lit panels may well show central dimming at these
>> illumination levels and may be worse for accurate printing than less costly
>> fluorescent backlit panels. Your monitor should also allow RGB adjustments.
>>
>> It is best to calibrate and print off a screen in a moderately lit
>> environment, understanding that ambient lighting may also fool your eyes
>> when you evaluate your prints. If you are anal compulsive you will be
>> creating a hood for your monitor as well.

>
> My issue is my prints are to light, I must darken them so its hard to
> see them on screen, when I brighten the screen surrounding white areas
> of the program are hard on my eyes they are so bright. My color is
> good.


Perhaps you can change the darkness setting on your printer to help with
that problem.
Bob
 
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ransley
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      11-24-2009
On Nov 23, 4:39*pm, Bob Williams <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> ransley wrote:
> > On Nov 23, 11:02 am, "igotsaurus" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >> It is easy to calibrate for color, difficult to calibrate for accurate
> >> WYSIWYG printing. Any device, from the Huey on up the price chain, will
> >> calibrate color quite accurately.

>
> >> The problem with calibrating LCD monitors is that except for high end
> >> graphics panels it is very difficult to tone down screen brightness so that
> >> you can still adequately see shadow detail but prints will match the screen
> >> in terms of brightness values., the dreaded dark print conundrum. If your
> >> LCD is too bright, as 99% of them are, paradoxically your color managed
> >> prints will be way too dark.

>
> >> I suggest that if you use a Spyder or other equivalent that allows you to
> >> calibrate for a target brightness level you aim for a screen brightness less
> >> than 100 by gradually turning down brightness and contrast, the latter being
> >> the more powerful controller of actual LCD screen brightness. You have to
> >> ignore the misleading instructions about visually evaluating the black and
> >> gray ramps in the calibration program and focus on overall luminance. LED
> >> peripherally back lit panels may well show central dimming at these
> >> illumination levels and may be worse for accurate printing than less costly
> >> fluorescent backlit panels. Your monitor should also allow RGB adjustments.

>
> >> It is best to calibrate and print off a screen in a moderately lit
> >> environment, understanding that ambient lighting may also fool your eyes
> >> when you evaluate your prints. If you are anal compulsive you will be
> >> creating a hood for your monitor as well.

>
> > My issue is my prints are to light, I must darken them so its hard to
> > see them on screen, when I brighten the screen surrounding white areas
> > of the program are hard on my eyes they are so bright. My color is
> > good.

>
> Perhaps you can change the darkness setting on your printer to help with
> that problem.
> Bob- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


I wonder if my problem is that abnormal, a Canon mp 950 printer with
new drivers, dell hardware, Canon, Adobe and Corel software. It should
be something simple, I hate tech support sessions.
 
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Don Lope de Aguirre
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      11-24-2009
"ransley" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>I have a good Lcd, what system is recomended, I see several products
> of different price ranges, are cheap ones inferior or lacking.



A good greyscale from a monitor calibration website is all I have ever used
and needed, it's free too. If you want to do color matching then find a good
photo that has accurate colors and match the monitor to that.

 
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Eric Stevens
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      11-24-2009
On Mon, 23 Nov 2009 16:08:02 -0800 (PST), ransley
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Nov 23, 4:39*pm, Bob Williams <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> ransley wrote:
>> > On Nov 23, 11:02 am, "igotsaurus" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> >> It is easy to calibrate for color, difficult to calibrate for accurate
>> >> WYSIWYG printing. Any device, from the Huey on up the price chain, will
>> >> calibrate color quite accurately.

>>
>> >> The problem with calibrating LCD monitors is that except for high end
>> >> graphics panels it is very difficult to tone down screen brightness so that
>> >> you can still adequately see shadow detail but prints will match the screen
>> >> in terms of brightness values., the dreaded dark print conundrum. If your
>> >> LCD is too bright, as 99% of them are, paradoxically your color managed
>> >> prints will be way too dark.

>>
>> >> I suggest that if you use a Spyder or other equivalent that allows you to
>> >> calibrate for a target brightness level you aim for a screen brightness less
>> >> than 100 by gradually turning down brightness and contrast, the latter being
>> >> the more powerful controller of actual LCD screen brightness. You have to
>> >> ignore the misleading instructions about visually evaluating the black and
>> >> gray ramps in the calibration program and focus on overall luminance. LED
>> >> peripherally back lit panels may well show central dimming at these
>> >> illumination levels and may be worse for accurate printing than less costly
>> >> fluorescent backlit panels. Your monitor should also allow RGB adjustments.

>>
>> >> It is best to calibrate and print off a screen in a moderately lit
>> >> environment, understanding that ambient lighting may also fool your eyes
>> >> when you evaluate your prints. If you are anal compulsive you will be
>> >> creating a hood for your monitor as well.

>>
>> > My issue is my prints are to light, I must darken them so its hard to
>> > see them on screen, when I brighten the screen surrounding white areas
>> > of the program are hard on my eyes they are so bright. My color is
>> > good.

>>
>> Perhaps you can change the darkness setting on your printer to help with
>> that problem.
>> Bob- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -

>
>I wonder if my problem is that abnormal, a Canon mp 950 printer with
>new drivers, dell hardware, Canon, Adobe and Corel software. It should
>be something simple, I hate tech support sessions.


You seem to have the usual problem of properly calibrating your
monitor and your printer. I suggest that if the printer is correctly
set up, and if you are using the right profiles for the particular ink
and paper then the problem is in your monitor.

It sounds to me as though you have got it set up too bright.



Eric Stevens
 
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