Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > NZ Computing > NZ Time Server

Reply
Thread Tools

NZ Time Server

 
 
Stephen Worthington
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-09-2009
On Fri, 09 Oct 2009 23:06:03 +1300, Malcolm Moore
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Fri, 09 Oct 2009 20:50:58 +1300, Stephen Worthington
><(E-Mail Removed)34.nz56.remove_numbers> wrote:
>
>>
>>GMT actually no longer exists. It is not a recognised time standard
>>any more. When people say GMT, they mean UTC now, although the old
>>GMT standard was not exactly the same as UTC. I believe that the
>>Greenwich Royal Observatory no longer exists as such and certainly
>>does not maintain a GMT time standard. The building it was in is now
>>part of the National Maritime Museum.

>
>It still exists to the extent that legislation in several countries
>still defines time in terms of GMT.
>
>Fom the page I posted before
>
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gmt
>
>"Several countries throughout the world legislatively define their
>local time by explicit reference to Greenwich Mean Time.[6][7] Some
>examples are:
>
> * United Kingdom: The Interpretation Act 1978, section 9 -
>provides that whenever an expression of time occurs in an Act, the
>time referred to shall (unless otherwise specifically stated) be held
>to be Greenwich mean time. Under subsection 23(3), the same rule
>applies to deeds and other instruments.[8][3]
> * Belgium: Decrees of 1946 and 1947 set legal time as one hour
>ahead of GMT.[6]
> * Republic of Ireland: Standard Time (Amendment) Act, 1971,
>section 1,[9] and Interpretation Act 2005, section 18(i).[10]
> * Canada: Interpretation Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. I-21, section
>35(1).[11]"
>
>The UK Act can be seen at
>
>http://www.opsi.gov.uk/RevisedStatut..._en_1#pb2-l1g9


I would expect that there would be problems then, as there is no
longer any GMT time kept anywhere - there are no time laboratories
that keep reference clocks running GMT that I know about. Maybe there
is other legislation somewhere redefining GMT to mean UTC. But since
GMT is not actually kept as a reference time anywhere anymore all the
legislation in the world referring to it is not going to do any good.
It is like the crazy laws that US legislatures pass occasionally, such
as redefining the value of pi to be 3.14 so that it was easier to
calculate with. The law can exist, but it does not change reality.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Malcolm Moore
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-10-2009
On Sat, 10 Oct 2009 02:35:28 +1300, Stephen Worthington
<(E-Mail Removed)34.nz56.remove_numbers> wrote:

>On Fri, 09 Oct 2009 23:06:03 +1300, Malcolm Moore
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>


>>
>>It still exists to the extent that legislation in several countries
>>still defines time in terms of GMT.
>>
>>Fom the page I posted before
>>
>>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gmt
>>
>>"Several countries throughout the world legislatively define their
>>local time by explicit reference to Greenwich Mean Time.[6][7] Some
>>examples are:
>>


snip

>
>I would expect that there would be problems then, as there is no
>longer any GMT time kept anywhere - there are no time laboratories
>that keep reference clocks running GMT that I know about. Maybe there
>is other legislation somewhere redefining GMT to mean UTC. But since
>GMT is not actually kept as a reference time anywhere anymore all the
>legislation in the world referring to it is not going to do any good.
>It is like the crazy laws that US legislatures pass occasionally, such
>as redefining the value of pi to be 3.14 so that it was easier to
>calculate with. The law can exist, but it does not change reality.


The measurement of time and the units used and the way it is expressed
is purely a human construct. We could have a discussion about whether
the scientific or the legal system takes precedence

However, there is an easily traced history of how GMT was redefined as
UT1 (not UTC), which is maintained as a standard, so I doubt there
would be a problem.

If you want to try, I suggest you start with the Canadians. Their
Interpretation Act defines their standard time zones in terms of hours
behind Greenwich time (note the lack of uppercase on time), not
Greenwich Mean Time.

http://www.canlii.org/en/ca/laws/sta...85-c-i-21.html

Does that mean the time in the town of Greenwich in the UK, in which
case their daylight saving period is dictated by the Brits, or does it
mean Greenwich in Connecticut, or Greenwich Village NY, both of which
would put their time zones way out wrt the USA.
OK, it's cold & wet & I'm avoiding doing other things

It's different to the US redefinition of pi, because pi is a
fundamental ratio without units. It's more akin to expressing
something in imperial measures after metrication.

--
Regards
Malcolm
Remove sharp objects to get a valid e-mail address

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is time.time() < time.time() always true? flamesrock Python 8 11-24-2006 06:51 AM
Re: interpreting the fractional portion of time.clock() vs time.time(0measurements Peter Hansen Python 0 02-22-2006 02:02 PM
Re: interpreting the fractional portion of time.clock() vs time.time()measurements Peter Hansen Python 0 02-22-2006 12:03 AM
time.clock() or time.time() peterbe@gmail.com Python 8 08-05-2005 01:51 PM
delta time = time stop - time start engsol Python 2 01-26-2004 12:06 PM



Advertisments