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Locking drive letters to partitions

 
 
johnsuth@nospam.com.au
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-24-2009
Is there a way in XP x64 and Win7 x64 to lock drive letters to partitions so
that disabling or removing one hard drive will not shift drive letters on
another.


 
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Charlie Russel - MVP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-24-2009
If you use Disk Manager (diskmgmt.msc) to explicitly set a drive letter, it
should continue to be respected if you later remove a drive in front of it.
And, certainly, should one shift down a letter, you can go in and fix that
and shift them back up. The exception to all of this, of course, is the
system drive - you can't change it.

--
Charlie.
http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel


<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:c1.2c.3H5ck2$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Is there a way in XP x64 and Win7 x64 to lock drive letters to partitions
> so
> that disabling or removing one hard drive will not shift drive letters on
> another.
>
>


 
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Carlos
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-24-2009
And the same concept also applies to external hard drives and pen drives.

Carlos

"Charlie Russel - MVP" wrote:

> If you use Disk Manager (diskmgmt.msc) to explicitly set a drive letter, it
> should continue to be respected if you later remove a drive in front of it.
> And, certainly, should one shift down a letter, you can go in and fix that
> and shift them back up. The exception to all of this, of course, is the
> system drive - you can't change it.
>
> --
> Charlie.
> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
>
>
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:c1.2c.3H5ck2$(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Is there a way in XP x64 and Win7 x64 to lock drive letters to partitions
> > so
> > that disabling or removing one hard drive will not shift drive letters on
> > another.
> >
> >

>
>

 
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R. C. White
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-24-2009
Hi, Charlie.

> The exception to all of this, of course, is the system drive - you can't
> change it.


The System Volume AND the Boot Volume. They often are the same, but also
often are NOT the same. Disk Management's Status column will identify each
of them. But older versions of Disk Management (Win2K/XP) show only a
single Status label, even if multiple statuses apply to a volume.

For the definition of System Volume and Boot Volume (which are backwards
from what most users expect), see KB 314470.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64

"Charlie Russel - MVP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> If you use Disk Manager (diskmgmt.msc) to explicitly set a drive letter,
> it should continue to be respected if you later remove a drive in front of
> it. And, certainly, should one shift down a letter, you can go in and fix
> that and shift them back up. The exception to all of this, of course, is
> the system drive - you can't change it.
>
> --
> Charlie.
>
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:c1.2c.3H5ck2$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Is there a way in XP x64 and Win7 x64 to lock drive letters to partitions
>> so
>> that disabling or removing one hard drive will not shift drive letters on
>> another.


 
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Charlie Russel - MVP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-24-2009
yes, if you explicitly set the drive letter of a removeable disk, such as a
pen drive, it will get mapped to that same drive letter the next time it's
seen. In fact, this will hold right up until you re-install the OS. Once you
boot from the installation CD/DVD and start the install, those mappings go
away. But if you run setup from inside Windows, they should be respected.
(Darrell pointed this out way back when we were first here as one of the
differences between a "repair install" and an "in place upgrade" to move
from the eval version to the real version.)

--
Charlie.
http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel


"Carlos" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> And the same concept also applies to external hard drives and pen drives.
>
> Carlos
>
> "Charlie Russel - MVP" wrote:
>
>> If you use Disk Manager (diskmgmt.msc) to explicitly set a drive letter,
>> it
>> should continue to be respected if you later remove a drive in front of
>> it.
>> And, certainly, should one shift down a letter, you can go in and fix
>> that
>> and shift them back up. The exception to all of this, of course, is the
>> system drive - you can't change it.
>>
>> --
>> Charlie.
>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
>>
>>
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:c1.2c.3H5ck2$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> > Is there a way in XP x64 and Win7 x64 to lock drive letters to
>> > partitions
>> > so
>> > that disabling or removing one hard drive will not shift drive letters
>> > on
>> > another.
>> >
>> >

>>
>>


 
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Charlie Russel - MVP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-24-2009
good point. Yes, they're often the same, but won't be moving forward with
Win7/R2 and later, since the install wants to create a small boot volume to
support BitLocker functionality. So folks need to get used to that. Of
course, there is no requirement that the boot volume have a drive letter at
all.

--
Charlie.
http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel


"R. C. White" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi, Charlie.
>
>> The exception to all of this, of course, is the system drive - you can't
>> change it.

>
> The System Volume AND the Boot Volume. They often are the same, but also
> often are NOT the same. Disk Management's Status column will identify
> each of them. But older versions of Disk Management (Win2K/XP) show only
> a single Status label, even if multiple statuses apply to a volume.
>
> For the definition of System Volume and Boot Volume (which are backwards
> from what most users expect), see KB 314470.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> (E-Mail Removed)
> Microsoft Windows MVP
> Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64
>
> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> If you use Disk Manager (diskmgmt.msc) to explicitly set a drive letter,
>> it should continue to be respected if you later remove a drive in front
>> of it. And, certainly, should one shift down a letter, you can go in and
>> fix that and shift them back up. The exception to all of this, of course,
>> is the system drive - you can't change it.
>>
>> --
>> Charlie.
>>
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:c1.2c.3H5ck2$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> Is there a way in XP x64 and Win7 x64 to lock drive letters to
>>> partitions so
>>> that disabling or removing one hard drive will not shift drive letters
>>> on
>>> another.

>


 
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R. C. White
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-25-2009
Hi, Charlie.

> Of course, there is no requirement that the boot volume have a drive
> letter at all.


The boot volume? Or the system volume? (See KB 314470 - and Disk
Management's Status column.)

Remember, as Ed Bott and others say, "We boot from the system volume and
keep the operating system files in the boot volume."

While I haven't yet seen it in action, my understanding is that Win7 creates
a small system volume - with no drive letter, by default. And it assigns C:
to whichever we choose as the new Win7's boot volume, even if that is the
3rd partition on the second HDD. But it does this only when booted from the
Win7 DVD (and maybe only on a "virgin" HDD with no existing Windows
installation - which is why I haven't seen it). When we install Win7 by
running its Setup from an already-installed Windows desktop, Win7 "inherits"
existing drive letters, including the letters for the system volume and for
whichever partition we choose to become the boot volume for installing the
new Win7.

My testing of different install behaviors is limited since I have only a
single computer. But I have several HDDs (4, but counted as 3 because 2 are
in a RAID 1 mirror) and I've created lots of logical drives on them (I'm
running out of alphabet for drive letters). So I usually have a long lineup
of volumes with several WinXP/Vista/Win7 beta and RTM installations, in
addition to my Data, Archive and other volumes (DVD, USB, etc.). I make
sure that the first partition on each HDD is a System Volume: an Active
primary partition that includes startup files so that I can boot from Disk 1
or Disk 2 if Disk 0 is damaged.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
(E-Mail Removed)
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64

"Charlie Russel - MVP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:#(E-Mail Removed)...
> good point. Yes, they're often the same, but won't be moving forward with
> Win7/R2 and later, since the install wants to create a small boot volume
> to support BitLocker functionality. So folks need to get used to that. Of
> course, there is no requirement that the boot volume have a drive letter
> at all.
>
> --
> Charlie.
> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
>
>
> "R. C. White" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Hi, Charlie.
>>
>>> The exception to all of this, of course, is the system drive - you can't
>>> change it.

>>
>> The System Volume AND the Boot Volume. They often are the same, but also
>> often are NOT the same. Disk Management's Status column will identify
>> each of them. But older versions of Disk Management (Win2K/XP) show only
>> a single Status label, even if multiple statuses apply to a volume.
>>
>> For the definition of System Volume and Boot Volume (which are backwards
>> from what most users expect), see KB 314470.
>>
>> RC
>>
>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> If you use Disk Manager (diskmgmt.msc) to explicitly set a drive letter,
>>> it should continue to be respected if you later remove a drive in front
>>> of it. And, certainly, should one shift down a letter, you can go in and
>>> fix that and shift them back up. The exception to all of this, of
>>> course, is the system drive - you can't change it.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Charlie.
>>>
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:c1.2c.3H5ck2$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>> Is there a way in XP x64 and Win7 x64 to lock drive letters to
>>>> partitions so
>>>> that disabling or removing one hard drive will not shift drive letters
>>>> on
>>>> another.


 
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Bobby Johnson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-25-2009
I would have to say Ed Bott is correct if he's talking about a clean
install of Windows 7 without any existing partitions. Win 7 creates a
100MB System Reserved partition and the rest of the drive is labeled as
having Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, and Primary Partition.


R. C. White wrote:
> Hi, Charlie.
>
>> Of course, there is no requirement that the boot volume have a drive
>> letter at all.

>
> The boot volume? Or the system volume? (See KB 314470 - and Disk
> Management's Status column.)
>
> Remember, as Ed Bott and others say, "We boot from the system volume and
> keep the operating system files in the boot volume."
>
> While I haven't yet seen it in action, my understanding is that Win7
> creates a small system volume - with no drive letter, by default. And
> it assigns C: to whichever we choose as the new Win7's boot volume, even
> if that is the 3rd partition on the second HDD. But it does this only
> when booted from the Win7 DVD (and maybe only on a "virgin" HDD with no
> existing Windows installation - which is why I haven't seen it). When
> we install Win7 by running its Setup from an already-installed Windows
> desktop, Win7 "inherits" existing drive letters, including the letters
> for the system volume and for whichever partition we choose to become
> the boot volume for installing the new Win7.
>
> My testing of different install behaviors is limited since I have only a
> single computer. But I have several HDDs (4, but counted as 3 because 2
> are in a RAID 1 mirror) and I've created lots of logical drives on them
> (I'm running out of alphabet for drive letters). So I usually have a
> long lineup of volumes with several WinXP/Vista/Win7 beta and RTM
> installations, in addition to my Data, Archive and other volumes (DVD,
> USB, etc.). I make sure that the first partition on each HDD is a
> System Volume: an Active primary partition that includes startup files
> so that I can boot from Disk 1 or Disk 2 if Disk 0 is damaged.
>
> RC

 
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Charlie Russel - MVP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-25-2009

Yes, you're right, they're backwards. If Win7's installer sees an existing
filesystem on the volume you select as the boot volume, it won't create the
system volume. If it creates the volume and filesystem, it will calve off a
100 Mb system volume that has no drive letter, and when you boot, whatever
volume is the boot volume will end up with a C: designation, regardless of
what it would normally be based on drive enumeration order.

The reason for this is to save them having to have a tool to carve out that
space for BitLocker. And one suspects anything else they might want to have
protected away from prying eyes at some point in the future.

--
Charlie.
http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel


"R. C. White" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:%(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi, Charlie.
>
>> Of course, there is no requirement that the boot volume have a drive
>> letter at all.

>
> The boot volume? Or the system volume? (See KB 314470 - and Disk
> Management's Status column.)
>
> Remember, as Ed Bott and others say, "We boot from the system volume and
> keep the operating system files in the boot volume."
>
> While I haven't yet seen it in action, my understanding is that Win7
> creates a small system volume - with no drive letter, by default. And it
> assigns C: to whichever we choose as the new Win7's boot volume, even if
> that is the 3rd partition on the second HDD. But it does this only when
> booted from the Win7 DVD (and maybe only on a "virgin" HDD with no
> existing Windows installation - which is why I haven't seen it). When we
> install Win7 by running its Setup from an already-installed Windows
> desktop, Win7 "inherits" existing drive letters, including the letters for
> the system volume and for whichever partition we choose to become the boot
> volume for installing the new Win7.
>
> My testing of different install behaviors is limited since I have only a
> single computer. But I have several HDDs (4, but counted as 3 because 2
> are in a RAID 1 mirror) and I've created lots of logical drives on them
> (I'm running out of alphabet for drive letters). So I usually have a long
> lineup of volumes with several WinXP/Vista/Win7 beta and RTM
> installations, in addition to my Data, Archive and other volumes (DVD,
> USB, etc.). I make sure that the first partition on each HDD is a System
> Volume: an Active primary partition that includes startup files so that I
> can boot from Disk 1 or Disk 2 if Disk 0 is damaged.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> (E-Mail Removed)
> Microsoft Windows MVP
> Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64
>
> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:#(E-Mail Removed)...
>> good point. Yes, they're often the same, but won't be moving forward with
>> Win7/R2 and later, since the install wants to create a small boot volume
>> to support BitLocker functionality. So folks need to get used to that. Of
>> course, there is no requirement that the boot volume have a drive letter
>> at all.
>>
>> --
>> Charlie.
>> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
>> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
>>
>>
>> "R. C. White" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> Hi, Charlie.
>>>
>>>> The exception to all of this, of course, is the system drive - you
>>>> can't change it.
>>>
>>> The System Volume AND the Boot Volume. They often are the same, but
>>> also often are NOT the same. Disk Management's Status column will
>>> identify each of them. But older versions of Disk Management (Win2K/XP)
>>> show only a single Status label, even if multiple statuses apply to a
>>> volume.
>>>
>>> For the definition of System Volume and Boot Volume (which are backwards
>>> from what most users expect), see KB 314470.
>>>
>>> RC
>>>
>>> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>>> message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>> If you use Disk Manager (diskmgmt.msc) to explicitly set a drive
>>>> letter, it should continue to be respected if you later remove a drive
>>>> in front of it. And, certainly, should one shift down a letter, you can
>>>> go in and fix that and shift them back up. The exception to all of
>>>> this, of course, is the system drive - you can't change it.
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Charlie.
>>>>
>>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:c1.2c.3H5ck2$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>> Is there a way in XP x64 and Win7 x64 to lock drive letters to
>>>>> partitions so
>>>>> that disabling or removing one hard drive will not shift drive letters
>>>>> on
>>>>> another.

>


 
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