Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > NZ Computing > Replacement PSU for D-Link - Amperage rating question.

Reply
Thread Tools

Replacement PSU for D-Link - Amperage rating question.

 
 
grum
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-30-2009
Stephen Worthington wrote:

>
> But why? Why should people expect such a short lifetime? It is not
> hard to design a power supply right so that it lasts and lasts. A
> very large proportion of the failures of electronic equipment recently
> after only a short lifetime can be traced back to the use of
> capacitors that fail after a very short working life. I would hope
> that no manufacturer will still be using such capacitors - if they
> are, then a failure of one is clearly a design fault on their part and
> they should replace the equipment under the CGA. Without the bad
> capacitors, then we get back to the traditional reasons for things
> failing of old age, such as dry joints, or values of components
> shifting a little with age. Those things typically take much longer.
> I would certainly expect an absolute minimum of 7 years of operation
> for a power supply, and any wholly electronic equipment.


Totally agree. We are being brainwashed into believing that things
failing after a 3 or 4 years is normal, or at least "not our (i.e.
manufacturer's) problem". *******s. My house is full of 20 year old
electronics that is still working perfectly. And some examples of more
recent stuff that has crapped out before it should. After some recent
positive (eventually) experiences staring down retailers while armed
with the CGA in my hand, I'm getting much more aggressive in doing my
bit to raise the level of expectation around how long stuff should last.
And whose problem it is when it doesn't.
Grumpy bastard.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Simon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-30-2009
On Jul 30, 12:39*pm, Stephen Worthington
<(E-Mail Removed)34.nz56.remove_numbers> wrote:

> But why? *Why should people expect such a short lifetime? *It is not
> hard to design a power supply right so that it lasts and lasts. *A
> very large proportion of the failures of electronic equipment recently
> after only a short lifetime can be traced back to the use of
> capacitors that fail after a very short working life. *I would hope
> that no manufacturer will still be using such capacitors - if they
> are, then a failure of one is clearly a design fault on their part and
> they should replace the equipment under the CGA. *Without the bad
> capacitors, then we get back to the traditional reasons for things
> failing of old age, such as dry joints, or values of components
> shifting a little with age. *Those things typically take much longer.
> I would certainly expect an absolute minimum of 7 years of operation
> for a power supply, and any wholly electronic equipment.



I agree. There's no technical reason why these devices need to fail so
quickly, however I believe at least part of the problem is that
consumers have demanded lower and lower prices. Manufacturers, having
reduced labour costs significantly (by shifting production to China
and India for example) have eventually had to compromise on quality in
order to continue the downward pressure on prices.

Many of the rather old pieces of electronic equipment I own dating
back to the 1980's such as my Apple IIe, still run just fine.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
peterwn
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-30-2009
On Jul 30, 12:39*pm, Stephen Worthington
<(E-Mail Removed)34.nz56.remove_numbers> wrote:
*Without the bad
> capacitors, then we get back to the traditional reasons for things
> failing of old age, such as dry joints, or values of components
> shifting a little with age. *Those things typically take much longer.
> I would certainly expect an absolute minimum of 7 years of operation
> for a power supply, and any wholly electronic equipment.


Sometimes there is a need for a 40 year life such as electrics
associated with pipe organs in churches etc. In one such case a 13.8
volt (tweaked up to 15v) 30amp power supply has been giving trouble
service for 28 years. Admittedly it is on only several hours per
week.

My scanner power supply failed after 13 months. By the time I got to
the top of the food chain and was muttering 'disputes tribunal' they
found a suitable one in their 'spares' box and honour was restored all
round.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Richard
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-01-2009
Woger wrote:

> Its very easy to crack these open and replace the needed parts, but the thing
> that some times goes and not easy to fix is the thermal fuse inside the
> transformer windings...


No its not, they are glued or welded closed, sometimes hidden screws
which nessecitates removing stickers etc from it.

Hardly easy to open in a way that preserves the item in a good
condition. Perhaps you are ok having some ghetto looking plug thats held
together with tape or whatever as a result.

and I havent had anything come with a trasnformer poewr adapter for many
years now... Other then a netgear router which did and was problematic.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Woger
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-01-2009
On Sat, 01 Aug 2009 18:25:40 +1200, Richard <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Woger wrote:
>
>> Its very easy to crack these open and replace the needed parts, but the thing
>> that some times goes and not easy to fix is the thermal fuse inside the
>> transformer windings...

>
>No its not, they are glued or welded closed, sometimes hidden screws
>which nessecitates removing stickers etc from it.
>
>Hardly easy to open in a way that preserves the item in a good
>condition. Perhaps you are ok having some ghetto looking plug thats held
>together with tape or whatever as a result.
>
>and I havent had anything come with a trasnformer poewr adapter for many
>years now... Other then a netgear router which did and was problematic.



This standard service way of Doing it I have done it many many times , But the
I am a fully trained Computer/Electronics service tech that knows what he is
doing..
 
Reply With Quote
 
EMB
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-02-2009
Woger wrote:
> On Sat, 01 Aug 2009 18:25:40 +1200, Richard <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Woger wrote:
>>
>>> Its very easy to crack these open and replace the needed parts, but the thing
>>> that some times goes and not easy to fix is the thermal fuse inside the
>>> transformer windings...

>> No its not, they are glued or welded closed, sometimes hidden screws
>> which nessecitates removing stickers etc from it.
>>
>> Hardly easy to open in a way that preserves the item in a good
>> condition. Perhaps you are ok having some ghetto looking plug thats held
>> together with tape or whatever as a result.
>>
>> and I havent had anything come with a trasnformer poewr adapter for many
>> years now... Other then a netgear router which did and was problematic.

>
>
> This standard service way of Doing it I have done it many many times , But the
> I am a fully trained Computer/Electronics service tech that knows what he is
> doing..


And I'm sure you have vast amounts of experience with SMPSs.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Today's Content Quality Rating For comp.lang.perl Web's Best Friend Perl 0 03-30-2006 08:37 PM
Voltage, Amperage for "Kodak dc 215" AC Adapter? nameless one Digital Photography 4 01-11-2006 07:53 AM
Replacement PSU for an ADSL Router Edward W. Thompson Wireless Networking 0 09-06-2005 10:40 AM
Rating 1 to 3 in order of preferences Question Patrick Olurotimi Ige ASP .Net 0 02-24-2005 05:37 AM
User rating and feedback form Mark ASP .Net 0 09-09-2004 07:07 AM



Advertisments