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Good books in computer science?

 
 
koranthala
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      06-13-2009
Hi all,
I do understand that this is not a python question and I apologize
for that straight up.
But I am a full time follower of this group and I have seen very
very brilliant programmers and solutions.
I also want to be a good programmer - so this question.

Which are the classic books in computer science which one should
peruse?
I have (a) Code Complete (b) GOF (c) Art of programming.

Art of programming was too tough for me - and I couldnt understand
much. The other two were good books - I understood and implemented
quite a bit from both.
What are the other books which I should peruse?

Regards
K
 
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python@bdurham.com
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      06-13-2009
Timeless classics - highly recommended:

Software Tools by Plaugher
Mythical Man Month by Brooks

Malcolm
 
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Paul Rubin
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      06-13-2009
koranthala <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> Which are the classic books in computer science which one should
> peruse?
> I have (a) Code Complete (b) GOF (c) Art of programming.
>
> Art of programming was too tough for me - and I couldnt understand
> much. The other two were good books - I understood and implemented
> quite a bit from both.
> What are the other books which I should peruse?


Code Complete and GOF are software engineering books but not really
CS books. TAOCP is a CS book but a bit old fashioned. Other classics:

Introduction to Algorithms by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson,
Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein.

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs by Harold Abelson
and Gerald Jay Sussman (online at mitpress.mit.edu/sicp)
 
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koranthala
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      06-13-2009

> Code Complete and GOF are software engineering books but not really
> CS books.


I understand and concur. Since I am a software engineer - coming in to
software from a different background - what I am looking for is self-
improvement books for a software engineer. This can include both CS
and Software books - even though I found that CS books are much less
understandable to me
 
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Nathan Stoddard
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      06-13-2009
On Sat, 13 Jun 2009 08:49:52 -0700, koranthala wrote:

> Hi all,
> I do understand that this is not a python question and I apologize
> for that straight up.
> But I am a full time follower of this group and I have seen very
> very brilliant programmers and solutions.
> I also want to be a good programmer


The best way to become a good programmer is to program. Write a lot of
code; work on some large projects. This will improve your skill more than
anything else. It's also important to learn new languages regularly. I
recommend to learn C, Python, and Lisp first.

> Which are the classic books in computer science which one should
> peruse?


A list of some good books is at steve.yegge.googlepages.com/ten-great-
books. Also read programming blogs.





--
Nathan Stoddard, http://nathanstoddard.com
 
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Rhodri James
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      06-13-2009
On Sat, 13 Jun 2009 18:37:13 +0100, koranthala <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>
>> Code Complete and GOF are software engineering books but not really
>> CS books.

>
> I understand and concur. Since I am a software engineer - coming in to
> software from a different background - what I am looking for is self-
> improvement books for a software engineer.


In that case The Mythical Man-Month (Brooks) is a must.

--
Rhodri James *-* Wildebeest Herder to the Masses
 
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Roy Smith
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      06-14-2009
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
"Rhodri James" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> The Mythical Man-Month (Brooks) is a must.


What's amazing about this book is just how relevant it is today, 35 years
after it was written. Some of the technical details have changed (how many
of us still keep our project notes on microfiche?), but cross out
"microfiche" and write in "wiki" and what he's saying is just as valid
today. It's not about computer science. It's not really even about
software engineering. It's more about general project management than
anything else.

In the same vein, Death March, by Ed Yourdon.
 
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Paul Rubin
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      06-14-2009
Roy Smith <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> In the same vein, Death March, by Ed Yourdon.


I've been wanting to read "Antipatterns".
 
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koranthala
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      06-14-2009
On Jun 14, 1:52*am, "Rhodri James" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
> On Sat, 13 Jun 2009 18:37:13 +0100, koranthala <(E-Mail Removed)> *
> wrote:
>
>
>
> >> Code Complete and GOF are software engineering books but not really
> >> CS books.

>
> > I understand and concur. Since I am a software engineer - coming in to
> > software from a different background - what I am looking for is self-
> > improvement books for a software engineer.

>
> In that case The Mythical Man-Month (Brooks) is a must.
>
> --
> Rhodri James *-* Wildebeest Herder to the Masses


Thank you Rhodri.
I do have Mythical Man-Month - a great book indeed.
I was looking for more technical books -
I have now got a good set - Putting it across so that others can also
use maybe -

Code Complete,
GOF,
Mythical Man-Month,
SICP - Thank you Paul - I have downloaded it from Web Site,
Introduction to algorithm - I have placed an order for the same,
The Pragmatic Programmer - Planning to buy,
Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code - again planning to
buy,
The C Programming Language - I had this, lost it, now I will buy
again,
The Little Schemer - I am not sure about buying this - I dont know
scheme
Software Tools - Seems to be a classic - not sure whether I will buy.

Regards
K
 
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rustom
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      06-14-2009
On Jun 14, 10:38*am, koranthala <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Software Tools - Seems to be a classic - not sure whether I will buy.

In that vein but more modern -- Art of Unix Programming by Eric
Raymond (available online)
Some of my old favorites:
Intro to functional programming by Bird and Wadler
TAOCP slightly more modernized more heady and less programmer oriented
-- Concrete Mathematics by Knuth and...
Science of Programming by David Gries; again more modernized to
Logical Approach to Discrete Mathematics
Bentley's Wriiting Efficient Programs and Programming pearls

Dijkstra's writings -- http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~EWD/transc...x/EWD1036.html
--
are not kind to software engineers [His defn of SE -- How to program
if you cannot].

Seemingly irrelevant -- Good programmers are very good with their
editors -- someone mentioned yegge. Read him for inspiration on
emacs. Of course you can use something else but its important to get
good at it.
 
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