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piping input to an external script

 
 
Tim Arnold
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-11-2009
Hi, I have some html files that I want to validate by using an external
script 'validate'. The html files need a doctype header attached before
validation. The files are in utf8 encoding. My code:
---------------
import os,sys
import codecs,subprocess
HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">'

filename = 'mytest.html'
fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
s = HEADER + fd.read()
fd.close()

p = subprocess.Popen(['validate'],
stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
validate = p.communicate(unicode(s,encoding='utf8'))
print validate
---------------

I get lots of lines like this:
Error at line 1, character 66:\tillegal character number 0
etc etc.

But I can give the command in a terminal 'cat mytest.html | validate' and
get reasonable output. My subprocess code must be wrong, but I could use
some help to see what the problem is.

python2.5.1, freebsd6
thanks,
--Tim


 
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Steve Howell
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2009
On May 11, 11:04*am, "Tim Arnold" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Hi, I have some html files that I want to validate by using an external
> script 'validate'. The html files need a doctype header attached before
> validation. The files are in utf8 encoding. My code:
> ---------------
> import os,sys
> import codecs,subprocess
> HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">'
>
> filename *= 'mytest.html'
> fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
> s = HEADER + fd.read()
> fd.close()
>
> p = subprocess.Popen(['validate'],
> * * * * * * * * * * stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
> * * * * * * * * * * stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
> * * * * * * * * * * stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
> validate = p.communicate(unicode(s,encoding='utf8'))
> print validate
> ---------------
>
> I get lots of lines like this:
> Error at line 1, character 66:\tillegal character number 0
> etc etc.
>
> But I can give the command in a terminal 'cat mytest.html | validate' and
> get reasonable output. My subprocess code must be wrong, but I could use
> some help to see what the problem is.
>


Newline missing after the header is my guess.
 
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norseman
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2009
Tim Arnold wrote:
> Hi, I have some html files that I want to validate by using an external
> script 'validate'. The html files need a doctype header attached before
> validation. The files are in utf8 encoding. My code:
> ---------------
> import os,sys
> import codecs,subprocess
> HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">'
>
> filename = 'mytest.html'
> fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
> s = HEADER + fd.read()
> fd.close()
>
> p = subprocess.Popen(['validate'],
> stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
> stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
> stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
> validate = p.communicate(unicode(s,encoding='utf8'))
> print validate
> ---------------
>
> I get lots of lines like this:
> Error at line 1, character 66:\tillegal character number 0
> etc etc.
>
> But I can give the command in a terminal 'cat mytest.html | validate' and
> get reasonable output. My subprocess code must be wrong, but I could use
> some help to see what the problem is.
>
> python2.5.1, freebsd6
> thanks,
> --Tim
>
>

============================
If you search through the recent Python-List for UTF-8 things you might
get the same understanding I have come to.

the problem is the use of python's 'print' subcommand or what ever it
is. It 'cooks' things and someone decided that it would only handle 1/2
of a byte (in the x'00 to x'7f' range) and ignore or send error messages
against anything else. I guess the person doing the deciding read the
part that says ASCII printables are in the 7 bit range and chose to
ignore the part about the rest of the byte being undefined. That is
undefined, not disallowed. Means the high bit half can be used as
wanted since it isn't already taken. Nor did whoever it was take a look
around the computer world and realize the conflict that was going to be
generated by using only 1/2 of a byte in a 1byte+ world.

If you can modify your code to use read and write you can bypass print
and be OK. Or just have python do the 'cat mytest.html | validate' for
you. (Apply a var for html and let python accomplish the the equivalent
of Unix's:
for f in *.html; do cat $f | validate; done
or
for f in *.html; do validate $f; done #file name available this way

If you still have problems, take a look at os.POPEN2 (and its popen3)
Also take look at os.spawn.. et al

HTH

Steve
 
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Steve Howell
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2009
On May 11, 10:16*pm, norseman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Tim Arnold wrote:
> > Hi, I have some html files that I want to validate by using an external
> > script 'validate'. The html files need a doctype header attached before
> > validation. The files are in utf8 encoding. My code:
> > ---------------
> > import os,sys
> > import codecs,subprocess
> > HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">'

>
> > filename *= 'mytest.html'
> > fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
> > s = HEADER + fd.read()
> > fd.close()

>
> > p = subprocess.Popen(['validate'],
> > * * * * * * * * * * stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
> > * * * * * * * * * * stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
> > * * * * * * * * * * stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
> > validate = p.communicate(unicode(s,encoding='utf8'))
> > print validate
> > ---------------

>
> > I get lots of lines like this:
> > Error at line 1, character 66:\tillegal character number 0
> > etc etc.

>
> > But I can give the command in a terminal 'cat mytest.html | validate' and
> > get reasonable output. My subprocess code must be wrong, but I could use
> > some help to see what the problem is.

>
> > python2.5.1, freebsd6
> > thanks,
> > --Tim

>
> ============================
> If you search through the recent Python-List for UTF-8 things you might
> get the same understanding I have come to.
>
> the problem is the use of python's 'print' subcommand or what ever it
> is. It 'cooks' things and someone decided that it would only handle 1/2
> of a byte (in the x'00 to x'7f' range) and ignore or send error messages
> against anything else. I guess the person doing the deciding read the
> part that says ASCII printables are in the 7 bit range and chose to
> ignore the part about the rest of the byte being undefined. That is
> undefined, not disallowed. *Means the high bit half can be used as
> wanted since it isn't already taken. Nor did whoever it was take a look
> around the computer world and realize the conflict that was going to be
> generated by using only 1/2 of a byte in a 1byte+ world.
>
> If you can modify your code to use read and write you can bypass print
> and be OK. *Or just have python do the 'cat mytest.html | validate' for
> you. (Apply a var for html and let python accomplish the the equivalent
> of Unix's:
> * * for f in *.html; do cat $f | validate; done
> * * * * * * * * * * * * *or
> * * *for f in *.html; do validate $f; done *#file name available this way
>
> If you still have problems, take a look at os.POPEN2 (and its popen3)
> Also take look at os.spawn.. et al
>


Wow. Unicode and subprocessing and printing can have dark corners,
but common sense does apply in MOST situations.

If you send the header, add the newline.

But you do not need the header if you can cat the input file sans
header and get sensible input.

Finally, if you are concerned about adding the header, then it belongs
in the original input file; otherwise, you are creating a false
positive.
 
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norseman
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2009
Steve Howell wrote:
> On May 11, 10:16 pm, norseman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Tim Arnold wrote:
>>> Hi, I have some html files that I want to validate by using an external
>>> script 'validate'. The html files need a doctype header attached before
>>> validation. The files are in utf8 encoding. My code:
>>> ---------------
>>> import os,sys
>>> import codecs,subprocess
>>> HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">'
>>> filename = 'mytest.html'
>>> fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
>>> s = HEADER + fd.read()
>>> fd.close()
>>> p = subprocess.Popen(['validate'],
>>> stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
>>> stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
>>> stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
>>> validate = p.communicate(unicode(s,encoding='utf8'))
>>> print validate
>>> ---------------
>>> I get lots of lines like this:
>>> Error at line 1, character 66:\tillegal character number 0
>>> etc etc.
>>> But I can give the command in a terminal 'cat mytest.html | validate' and
>>> get reasonable output. My subprocess code must be wrong, but I could use
>>> some help to see what the problem is.
>>> python2.5.1, freebsd6
>>> thanks,
>>> --Tim

>> ============================
>> If you search through the recent Python-List for UTF-8 things you might
>> get the same understanding I have come to.
>>
>> the problem is the use of python's 'print' subcommand or what ever it
>> is. It 'cooks' things and someone decided that it would only handle 1/2
>> of a byte (in the x'00 to x'7f' range) and ignore or send error messages
>> against anything else. I guess the person doing the deciding read the
>> part that says ASCII printables are in the 7 bit range and chose to
>> ignore the part about the rest of the byte being undefined. That is
>> undefined, not disallowed. Means the high bit half can be used as
>> wanted since it isn't already taken. Nor did whoever it was take a look
>> around the computer world and realize the conflict that was going to be
>> generated by using only 1/2 of a byte in a 1byte+ world.
>>
>> If you can modify your code to use read and write you can bypass print
>> and be OK. Or just have python do the 'cat mytest.html | validate' for
>> you. (Apply a var for html and let python accomplish the the equivalent
>> of Unix's:
>> for f in *.html; do cat $f | validate; done
>> or
>> for f in *.html; do validate $f; done #file name available this way
>>
>> If you still have problems, take a look at os.POPEN2 (and its popen3)
>> Also take look at os.spawn.. et al
>>

>
> Wow. Unicode and subprocessing and printing can have dark corners,
> but common sense does apply in MOST situations.
>
> If you send the header, add the newline.
>
> But you do not need the header if you can cat the input file sans
> header and get sensible input.
>


Yep! The problem is with 'print'

> Finally, if you are concerned about adding the header, then it belongs
> in the original input file; otherwise, you are creating a false
> positive.



Steve
 
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Steve Howell
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2009
On May 11, 11:31*pm, norseman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Steve Howell wrote:
> > On May 11, 10:16 pm, norseman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >> Tim Arnold wrote:
> >>> Hi, I have some html files that I want to validate by using an external
> >>> script 'validate'. The html files need a doctype header attached before
> >>> validation. The files are in utf8 encoding. My code:
> >>> ---------------
> >>> import os,sys
> >>> import codecs,subprocess
> >>> HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">'
> >>> filename *= 'mytest.html'
> >>> fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
> >>> s = HEADER + fd.read()
> >>> fd.close()
> >>> p = subprocess.Popen(['validate'],
> >>> * * * * * * * * * * stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
> >>> * * * * * * * * * * stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
> >>> * * * * * * * * * * stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
> >>> validate = p.communicate(unicode(s,encoding='utf8'))
> >>> print validate
> >>> ---------------
> >>> I get lots of lines like this:
> >>> Error at line 1, character 66:\tillegal character number 0
> >>> etc etc.
> >>> But I can give the command in a terminal 'cat mytest.html | validate' and
> >>> get reasonable output. My subprocess code must be wrong, but I could use
> >>> some help to see what the problem is.
> >>> python2.5.1, freebsd6
> >>> thanks,
> >>> --Tim
> >> ============================
> >> If you search through the recent Python-List for UTF-8 things you might
> >> get the same understanding I have come to.

>
> >> the problem is the use of python's 'print' subcommand or what ever it
> >> is. It 'cooks' things and someone decided that it would only handle 1/2
> >> of a byte (in the x'00 to x'7f' range) and ignore or send error messages
> >> against anything else. I guess the person doing the deciding read the
> >> part that says ASCII printables are in the 7 bit range and chose to
> >> ignore the part about the rest of the byte being undefined. That is
> >> undefined, not disallowed. *Means the high bit half can be used as
> >> wanted since it isn't already taken. Nor did whoever it was take a look
> >> around the computer world and realize the conflict that was going to be
> >> generated by using only 1/2 of a byte in a 1byte+ world.

>
> >> If you can modify your code to use read and write you can bypass print
> >> and be OK. *Or just have python do the 'cat mytest.html | validate' for
> >> you. (Apply a var for html and let python accomplish the the equivalent
> >> of Unix's:
> >> * * for f in *.html; do cat $f | validate; done
> >> * * * * * * * * * * * * *or
> >> * * *for f in *.html; do validate $f; done *#file name available this way

>
> >> If you still have problems, take a look at os.POPEN2 (and its popen3)
> >> Also take look at os.spawn.. et al

>
> > Wow. *Unicode and subprocessing and printing can have dark corners,
> > but common sense does apply in MOST situations.

>
> > If you send the header, add the newline.

>
> > But you do not need the header if you can cat the input file sans
> > header and get sensible input.

>
> Yep! *The problem is with 'print'
>


Huh? Print is printing exactly what you expect it to print.

 
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Dave Angel
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2009
Tim Arnold wrote:
> Hi, I have some html files that I want to validate by using an external
> script 'validate'. The html files need a doctype header attached before
> validation. The files are in utf8 encoding. My code:
> ---------------
> import os,sys
> import codecs,subprocess
> HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">'
>
> filename = 'mytest.html'
> fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
> s = HEADER + fd.read()
> fd.close()
>
> p = subprocess.Popen(['validate'],
> stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
> stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
> stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
> validate = p.communicate(unicode(s,encoding='utf8'))
> print validate
> ---------------
>
> I get lots of lines like this:
> Error at line 1, character 66:\tillegal character number 0
> etc etc.
>
> But I can give the command in a terminal 'cat mytest.html | validate' and
> get reasonable output. My subprocess code must be wrong, but I could use
> some help to see what the problem is.
>
> python2.5.1, freebsd6
> thanks,
> --Tim
>
>
>
>

The usual rule in debugging: split the problem into two parts, and test
each one separately, starting with the one you think most likely to be
the culprit

In this case the obvious place to split is with the data you're passing
to the communicate call. I expect it's already wrong, long before you
hand it to the subprocess. So write it to a file instead, and inspect
it with a binary file viewer. And of course test it manually with your
validate program. Is validate really expecting a Unicode stream in stdin ?


 
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norseman
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2009
Steve Howell wrote:
> On May 11, 11:31 pm, norseman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Steve Howell wrote:
>>> On May 11, 10:16 pm, norseman <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>> Tim Arnold wrote:
>>>>> Hi, I have some html files that I want to validate by using an external
>>>>> script 'validate'. The html files need a doctype header attached before
>>>>> validation. The files are in utf8 encoding. My code:
>>>>> ---------------
>>>>> import os,sys
>>>>> import codecs,subprocess
>>>>> HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">'
>>>>> filename = 'mytest.html'
>>>>> fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
>>>>> s = HEADER + fd.read()
>>>>> fd.close()
>>>>> p = subprocess.Popen(['validate'],
>>>>> stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
>>>>> stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
>>>>> stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
>>>>> validate = p.communicate(unicode(s,encoding='utf8'))
>>>>> print validate
>>>>> ---------------
>>>>> I get lots of lines like this:
>>>>> Error at line 1, character 66:\tillegal character number 0
>>>>> etc etc.
>>>>> But I can give the command in a terminal 'cat mytest.html | validate' and
>>>>> get reasonable output. My subprocess code must be wrong, but I could use
>>>>> some help to see what the problem is.
>>>>> python2.5.1, freebsd6
>>>>> thanks,
>>>>> --Tim
>>>> ============================
>>>> If you search through the recent Python-List for UTF-8 things you might
>>>> get the same understanding I have come to.
>>>> the problem is the use of python's 'print' subcommand or what ever it
>>>> is. It 'cooks' things and someone decided that it would only handle 1/2
>>>> of a byte (in the x'00 to x'7f' range) and ignore or send error messages
>>>> against anything else. I guess the person doing the deciding read the
>>>> part that says ASCII printables are in the 7 bit range and chose to
>>>> ignore the part about the rest of the byte being undefined. That is
>>>> undefined, not disallowed. Means the high bit half can be used as
>>>> wanted since it isn't already taken. Nor did whoever it was take a look
>>>> around the computer world and realize the conflict that was going to be
>>>> generated by using only 1/2 of a byte in a 1byte+ world.
>>>> If you can modify your code to use read and write you can bypass print
>>>> and be OK. Or just have python do the 'cat mytest.html | validate' for
>>>> you. (Apply a var for html and let python accomplish the the equivalent
>>>> of Unix's:
>>>> for f in *.html; do cat $f | validate; done
>>>> or
>>>> for f in *.html; do validate $f; done #file name available this way
>>>> If you still have problems, take a look at os.POPEN2 (and its popen3)
>>>> Also take look at os.spawn.. et al
>>> Wow. Unicode and subprocessing and printing can have dark corners,
>>> but common sense does apply in MOST situations.
>>> If you send the header, add the newline.
>>> But you do not need the header if you can cat the input file sans
>>> header and get sensible input.

>> Yep! The problem is with 'print'
>>

>
> Huh? Print is printing exactly what you expect it to print.
>

===============
My apologies.

Tim: Using what you posted;
Is the third char of the first line read from file a TAB?

Just curious. len(HEADER) is 63, error at 66 char number 0, doesn't
seem quite consistent math wise.
63 + cr + lf gives 65. But, as another noted, you don't have those.
"...66:\tillegal..." is '\t' a tab on screen or byte 1 or 3 of file?
If you have mc available, in it - highlight file and press Shift-F3 then
F4. 09 is TAB

</title> is closing, should not exist as opener
<html> can be opener, did the h somehow become a '\'
(still - that would put x'09' at byte 2 of file)

Most validate programs I have used will let me know the header is
missing if in fact it is and give me a choice of how to process (XML,
XHTML, HTML 1.1, ...) or quit.

is HEADER ('<!DOC...>') itself already in utf-8?
Or are you mixing things?

Last but not least - if you have source of validate process, check that
over carefully. The numbers don't work for me.

Just thinking on paper. No need to respond.

Steve
 
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Tim Arnold
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2009
"Dave Angel" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Tim Arnold wrote:
>> Hi, I have some html files that I want to validate by using an external
>> script 'validate'. The html files need a doctype header attached before
>> validation. The files are in utf8 encoding. My code:
>> ---------------
>> import os,sys
>> import codecs,subprocess
>> HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01
>> Transitional//EN">'
>>
>> filename = 'mytest.html'
>> fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
>> s = HEADER + fd.read()
>> fd.close()
>>
>> p = subprocess.Popen(['validate'],
>> stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
>> stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
>> stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
>> validate = p.communicate(unicode(s,encoding='utf8'))
>> print validate
>> ---------------
>>
>> I get lots of lines like this:
>> Error at line 1, character 66:\tillegal character number 0
>> etc etc.
>>
>> But I can give the command in a terminal 'cat mytest.html | validate' and
>> get reasonable output. My subprocess code must be wrong, but I could use
>> some help to see what the problem is.
>>
>> python2.5.1, freebsd6
>> thanks,
>> --Tim
>>
>>
>>
>>

> The usual rule in debugging: split the problem into two parts, and test
> each one separately, starting with the one you think most likely to be the
> culprit
>
> In this case the obvious place to split is with the data you're passing to
> the communicate call. I expect it's already wrong, long before you hand
> it to the subprocess. So write it to a file instead, and inspect it with
> a binary file viewer. And of course test it manually with your validate
> program. Is validate really expecting a Unicode stream in stdin ?
>


Good advice from everyone. The example was simpler than my actual situation,
but it did show the problem. Dave's final question was the right one: I
needed to pass the html content as a string, not unicode object:

HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">\n'

filename = 'mytest.html'
fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
s = HEADER + fd.read().encode('utf8') # <- made the difference
fd.close()

p = subprocess.Popen(['validate',],
stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
validate = p.communicate(s)
print validate



 
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Steve Howell
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-12-2009
See suggested debugging tip inline of your program....

On May 11, 11:04*am, "Tim Arnold" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Hi, I have some html files that I want to validate by using an external
> script 'validate'. The html files need a doctype header attached before
> validation. The files are in utf8 encoding. My code:
> ---------------
> import os,sys
> import codecs,subprocess
> HEADER = '<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">'
>
> filename *= 'mytest.html'
> fd = codecs.open(filename,'rb',encoding='utf8')
> s = HEADER + fd.read()


# Try inserting lines like below, to see what characters are actually
near char 66.
print '---'
print repr(s[65])
print repr(s[66])
print repr(s[:70])
print repr(unicode(s,encoding='utf8')[:70])
print '---'

> fd.close()
>
> p = subprocess.Popen(['validate'],
> * * * * * * * * * * stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
> * * * * * * * * * * stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
> * * * * * * * * * * stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
> validate = p.communicate(unicode(s,encoding='utf8'))
> print validate
> ---------------
>
> I get lots of lines like this:
> Error at line 1, character 66:\tillegal character number 0
> etc etc.
>


See above, it's pretty easy to see what the 66th character of "s" is.

> But I can give the command in a terminal 'cat mytest.html | validate' and
> get reasonable output. My subprocess code must be wrong, but I could use
> some help to see what the problem is.
>


Your disconnect is that in your program you are NOT actually
simulating the sending of mytest.html to the validate program, so you
are comparing apples and oranges.

The fact that you can send mytest.html to the validate program without
a header from the shell suggest to me that it is equally unnecessary
in your Python program, or maybe you just haven't thought through what
you're really trying to accomplish here.

 
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