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disheartened

 
 
schmillivolt@yahoo.com
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-13-2005

me wrote:
> I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
> certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
> wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad money--BUT
> they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and 5+
> years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more than $9
> an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current state
> of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
>
> Anyone else have this problem?


The problem is that those in the IT field are the modern day
equivalents of the "tube changers" of the 50's and 60's who called
themselves TV repairmen. Truth be told, a monkey can be taught how to
fix or build a computer.... or at least, a functionally retarded
person. Very little brain power is required.

The field is oversaturated. The work is boring beyond words. There are
some companies who pay as much as the local fast food joints. The
entire certification institution is a scam.

Focus on another career; a career where you can make good money... and
a good living... one that will allow you to use your brain.

Good luck

 
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jc
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-22-2005
There are some things that can be learned from this whole situation. If you
are in a job that pays well and it is not IT related, don't leave it for IT.
Yes everyone wants experience, it's like the catch 22 with credit, nobody is
willing to take a chance on you. Yes, most people want a BS in comp sci or
info systems and this is for good reason. An employer wants someone that
has the ability to learn something new and can do it quickly - this is all a
BS tells them. Certifications alone are really worthless, experience is
what counts, and A+ is about totally worthless.

If you have to, do free IT work for churches, non-profit groups, and other
organizations that always have a hand out. This will get you experience and
also help you make connections that might get you interviews where you want
to be. Take a good look at your resume, have other both technical and non
technical people look at it and follow the suggestion they give - it helps
to have someone that does hiring as the one looking. Tailor each resume and
cover letter to the job listed or the job you want. Follow up with phone
calls or another letter. The law of averages also needs to be applied here,
the more resumes you send out the better your chances are of getting a call
back. You really have to sell yourself to someone, each job may attract
more than 100 resumes and you need to have one that gets you an interview.

In an interview be honest, don't bs, it will be obvious. This is the point
where you need to talk the part, walk the part, and dress the part - the
toughest thing is if you worked in a factory, mill or plant - forget
everything you did there. Take notes in the interview and ask lots of
questions(not money or benefit related), this will show an interest as well
as much more. Practice your interview skills, over and over, there are lots
of good resources online that will prep you with questions. In the
interview never be afraid to say you don't have experience with something
but you are willing to learn it. Also, when asked about what you have done
to stay current with IT trends, have answers. There are a lot of free
resources at microsoft, sans, cicso, and others - webcasts and free events
you should be attending. Last thing for the interview, don't go in there
like these people owe you something, it is your job to get or lose, it's up
to you - and always follow up an interview with a personal thank you letter.

I was in a job, IT, that I hated. I had looked for about a year to leave.
Once I got serious about getting out I cranked out 3-5 resumes a week and
made a lot of calls. It was about 4 months till I started the new job.
Don't expect you are going to start at the top (if this is your first IT
job), you will have to start with idiot IT work until you prove what you can
handle. Never lose hope, this is self doom.

Good luck


"me" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:MH4bf.9$(E-Mail Removed)...
>I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
> certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
> wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad money--BUT
> they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and 5+
> years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more than
> $9
> an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current
> state
> of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
>
> Anyone else have this problem?
>
>



 
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schmillivolt@yahoo.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-26-2005

Dems are Back wrote:
> Opinions are like assholes: everyone has one. The industry was damaged
> by the offhshoring of tens of thousands of jobs.


Welcome to the 21st century. It's only going to get worse. The IT field
is crumbling!

>IT, in fact, is a
> mentally demnding industry and most of the colleges only allow the
> brighter students into these programs.


You think? I deligated thousands of jobs to 20+ of the "lowest wattage
bulbs" I have ever encountered. They all had several certs. What's this
tell you?

>I don't think millivolt has ever
> worked in a NOC or the server room.


I only wish that were the case

 
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Edward A. Weissbard
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-13-2006
jc,

Good, detailed advice. If you really like the IT field, you should have no
problem giving a little of your time for free to expand your
skills...............I like that.

--
Edward A. Weissbard
El Paso, TX

"Life is easy with eyes closed"

"jc" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> There are some things that can be learned from this whole situation. If

you
> are in a job that pays well and it is not IT related, don't leave it for

IT.
> Yes everyone wants experience, it's like the catch 22 with credit, nobody

is
> willing to take a chance on you. Yes, most people want a BS in comp sci

or
> info systems and this is for good reason. An employer wants someone that
> has the ability to learn something new and can do it quickly - this is all

a
> BS tells them. Certifications alone are really worthless, experience is
> what counts, and A+ is about totally worthless.
>
> If you have to, do free IT work for churches, non-profit groups, and other
> organizations that always have a hand out. This will get you experience

and
> also help you make connections that might get you interviews where you

want
> to be. Take a good look at your resume, have other both technical and non
> technical people look at it and follow the suggestion they give - it helps
> to have someone that does hiring as the one looking. Tailor each resume

and
> cover letter to the job listed or the job you want. Follow up with phone
> calls or another letter. The law of averages also needs to be applied

here,
> the more resumes you send out the better your chances are of getting a

call
> back. You really have to sell yourself to someone, each job may attract
> more than 100 resumes and you need to have one that gets you an interview.
>
> In an interview be honest, don't bs, it will be obvious. This is the

point
> where you need to talk the part, walk the part, and dress the part - the
> toughest thing is if you worked in a factory, mill or plant - forget
> everything you did there. Take notes in the interview and ask lots of
> questions(not money or benefit related), this will show an interest as

well
> as much more. Practice your interview skills, over and over, there are

lots
> of good resources online that will prep you with questions. In the
> interview never be afraid to say you don't have experience with something
> but you are willing to learn it. Also, when asked about what you have

done
> to stay current with IT trends, have answers. There are a lot of free
> resources at microsoft, sans, cicso, and others - webcasts and free events
> you should be attending. Last thing for the interview, don't go in there
> like these people owe you something, it is your job to get or lose, it's

up
> to you - and always follow up an interview with a personal thank you

letter.
>
> I was in a job, IT, that I hated. I had looked for about a year to leave.
> Once I got serious about getting out I cranked out 3-5 resumes a week and
> made a lot of calls. It was about 4 months till I started the new job.
> Don't expect you are going to start at the top (if this is your first IT
> job), you will have to start with idiot IT work until you prove what you

can
> handle. Never lose hope, this is self doom.
>
> Good luck
>
>
> "me" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:MH4bf.9$(E-Mail Removed)...
> >I have become disheartened over the minimum job prospects available to a
> > certified technicnan in todays market. Every employer I have seen only
> > wanted to pay somewhere between $9-15 per hour--which isn't bad

money--BUT
> > they want you to have an MCSE, and a BS degree in computer science and

5+
> > years experience before they will offer you the job. I make more than
> > $9
> > an hour now working in retail, and it simply sickens me at the current
> > state
> > of the job market and the current attitude of employers....
> >
> > Anyone else have this problem?
> >
> >

>
>



 
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