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DVD-ROM problems

 
 
Dave Hardenbrook
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      07-11-2005
I am currently diagnosing a problem with a DVD-ROM drive, which is
showing very odd behavior:

Windows is running normally and you insert a disk (*any* disk: CD-ROM,
audio CD, Video DVD, DVD-ROM, CD-R, CD-RW), the lights on the DVD-ROM
drive and the hard drive go on and stay on, and the DVD's drive
letter disappers from the folder tree in Windows Explorer and doesn't
return. Windows itself doesn't hang -- it just refuses to "see"
whatever is in the DVD-ROM. (The system also has a CD-RW and it reads
all CD-format disks without any problem.)

Now if I warm-reboot (same disk still in the DVD drive), when I get to
the POST, it pauses anywhere from five to 20 seconds as it looks for IDE
devices before displaying them. Then the system hangs when it tries to
check if the disk in the DVD is bootable. Now I do a cold boot (either
the Reset button or a full power off and on again), and now I get past
the POST and the boot check in a few seconds, and when Windows comes up,
the disk in the DVD drive is visible and usable! But as soon as I swap
disks, Windows stalls on trying to read the new disk, and I have to
cold-boot again as described above before the disk can be accessed.

What on earth could be causing this?

Specs:

CPU: Duron 950 Mhz
256M Memory
Mobo chipset: VIA KT133A

IDEs: PM: Sony DVD-ROM (the problem), PS: LiteOn CD-RW (works fine);
SM: Maxtor 40G hardrive, SS: Zip 250

Windows XP Home SP2

--
Dave
 
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Linker3000
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      07-11-2005
Dave Hardenbrook wrote:

> I am currently diagnosing a problem with a DVD-ROM drive, which is
> showing very odd behavior:
>
> Windows is running normally and you insert a disk (*any* disk: CD-ROM,
> audio CD, Video DVD, DVD-ROM, CD-R, CD-RW), the lights on the DVD-ROM
> drive and the hard drive go on and stay on, and the DVD's drive
> letter disappers from the folder tree in Windows Explorer and doesn't
> return. Windows itself doesn't hang -- it just refuses to "see"
> whatever is in the DVD-ROM. (The system also has a CD-RW and it reads
> all CD-format disks without any problem.)
>
> Now if I warm-reboot (same disk still in the DVD drive), when I get to
> the POST, it pauses anywhere from five to 20 seconds as it looks for IDE
> devices before displaying them. Then the system hangs when it tries to
> check if the disk in the DVD is bootable. Now I do a cold boot (either
> the Reset button or a full power off and on again), and now I get past
> the POST and the boot check in a few seconds, and when Windows comes up,
> the disk in the DVD drive is visible and usable! But as soon as I swap
> disks, Windows stalls on trying to read the new disk, and I have to
> cold-boot again as described above before the disk can be accessed.
>
> What on earth could be causing this?
>
> Specs:
>
> CPU: Duron 950 Mhz
> 256M Memory
> Mobo chipset: VIA KT133A
>
> IDEs: PM: Sony DVD-ROM (the problem), PS: LiteOn CD-RW (works fine);
> SM: Maxtor 40G hardrive, SS: Zip 250
>
> Windows XP Home SP2
>
> --
> Dave


Have a look at the drive jumper settings - are they setup for
master/slave or cable select properly - then test by substitution?
Cable? Drive? They're so cheap thesedays that it's not worth spending
much time on the hardware - at least a swap-out of bits one by one will
steer you in the hardware or software direction.
 
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rainman
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      07-12-2005
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Linker3000 wrote:
> Dave Hardenbrook wrote:
>
>> I am currently diagnosing a problem with a DVD-ROM drive, which is
>> showing very odd behavior:
>> Windows is running normally and you insert a disk (*any* disk: CD-ROM,
>> audio CD, Video DVD, DVD-ROM, CD-R, CD-RW), the lights on the DVD-ROM
>> drive and the hard drive go on and stay on, and the DVD's drive letter
>> disappers from the folder tree in Windows Explorer and doesn't
>> return. Windows itself doesn't hang -- it just refuses to "see"
>> whatever is in the DVD-ROM. (The system also has a CD-RW and it reads
>> all CD-format disks without any problem.)
>>
>> Now if I warm-reboot (same disk still in the DVD drive), when I get to
>> the POST, it pauses anywhere from five to 20 seconds as it looks for
>> IDE devices before displaying them. Then the system hangs when it
>> tries to check if the disk in the DVD is bootable. Now I do a cold
>> boot (either the Reset button or a full power off and on again), and
>> now I get past the POST and the boot check in a few seconds, and when
>> Windows comes up, the disk in the DVD drive is visible and usable!
>> But as soon as I swap disks, Windows stalls on trying to read the new
>> disk, and I have to cold-boot again as described above before the disk
>> can be accessed.
>>
>> What on earth could be causing this?
>>
>> Specs:
>>
>> CPU: Duron 950 Mhz
>> 256M Memory
>> Mobo chipset: VIA KT133A
>>
>> IDEs: PM: Sony DVD-ROM (the problem), PS: LiteOn CD-RW (works fine);
>> SM: Maxtor 40G hardrive, SS: Zip 250
>> Windows XP Home SP2
>>
>> --
>> Dave

>
>
> Have a look at the drive jumper settings - are they setup for
> master/slave or cable select properly - then test by substitution?
> Cable? Drive? They're so cheap thesedays that it's not worth spending
> much time on the hardware - at least a swap-out of bits one by one will
> steer you in the hardware or software direction.


In my opinion, the problem is most likely due to (in this order): dirty
drive (clean it), overworked or failing power supply, bad cables, or
faulty IDE controller (you didn't specify, but I assume it's an IDE drive).

Rainman
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Dave Hardenbrook
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      07-13-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, news.65739
@buckeye-express.com says...
> In my opinion, the problem is most likely due to (in this order): dirty
> drive (clean it)...


What's the best way to clean it? One of my A+ books says spray
compressed air into it, but won't that just blow the dust and debris
*deeper* into the mechanism?

--
Dave
 
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rainman
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      07-13-2005
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Hash: SHA1

Dave Hardenbrook wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, news.65739
> @buckeye-express.com says...
>
>>In my opinion, the problem is most likely due to (in this order): dirty
>>drive (clean it)...

>
>
> What's the best way to clean it? One of my A+ books says spray
> compressed air into it, but won't that just blow the dust and debris
> *deeper* into the mechanism?
>
> --
> Dave


When you spray air in, it forces air out as well. Only so much air can
fit, and the outgoing air should carry away most of the dust. However,
chances are... there's not much in there... it's just in the wrong
spot... if you can get the dust off the laser mechanism, and onto the
back of the drive near the gears... it'd still be preferable. But most
of it should come out if that's the problem.

Don't forget to use the can properly, though. Make sure the system is
powered down, and the drive is unplugged from the power supply... you
don't want it to short out if some moister sprays from the can. To avoid
moisture, hold the can upright, and spray in half second bursts.

You can also get some of those "drive cleaning discs" that you insert
and run with the software for a specified period of time... but I'm not
sure how well these work, as I don't think the lens actually comes into
contact with the disc.

Rainman
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JohnO
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      07-13-2005
> In my opinion, the problem is most likely due to (in this order): dirty
> drive (clean it), overworked or failing power supply, bad cables, or
> faulty IDE controller (you didn't specify, but I assume it's an IDE
> drive).
>


A drive not appearing in BIOS or on a list of drives is a logic problem, not
dust or dirt. You could pour mud in the drive and the BIOS will still see
its controller.

For some reason the mobo drive controller is not seeing the drive, and thus
not seeing the info needed to make it active, reliably. I think the order of
attack is:

Connections (loose or broken data cable, or cable select with an old 40-pin
cable)
Configuration (master/slave jumper)
Bad drive

Try the drive on the IDE channel all by itself, and make sure the cable is
80 pins and that it works.

-John O



 
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AG
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-16-2005


> When you spray air in, it forces air out as well. Only so much air can
> fit, and the outgoing air should carry away most of the dust. However,
> chances are... there's not much in there... it's just in the wrong
> spot... if you can get the dust off the laser mechanism, and onto the
> back of the drive near the gears... it'd still be preferable. But most
> of it should come out if that's the problem.
>
> Don't forget to use the can properly, though. Make sure the system is
> powered down, and the drive is unplugged from the power supply... you
> don't want it to short out if some moister sprays from the can. To avoid
> moisture, hold the can upright, and spray in half second bursts.
>
> You can also get some of those "drive cleaning discs" that you insert
> and run with the software for a specified period of time... but I'm not
> sure how well these work, as I don't think the lens actually comes into
> contact with the disc.
>
> Rainman

The moisture that comes out of a can of air won't hurt the drive. If it
were water it probably would but what is in those cans isn't water it's the
propellant. It's a non-issue. If you are using compressed air from a tank
or compressor then there is a good chance of condensation in the air. That
could be a bad thing but most good compressors have a moisture bleed off
valve to get rid of it.

AG


 
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rainman
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      07-17-2005
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AG wrote:
>>When you spray air in, it forces air out as well. Only so much air can
>>fit, and the outgoing air should carry away most of the dust. However,
>>chances are... there's not much in there... it's just in the wrong
>>spot... if you can get the dust off the laser mechanism, and onto the
>>back of the drive near the gears... it'd still be preferable. But most
>>of it should come out if that's the problem.
>>
>>Don't forget to use the can properly, though. Make sure the system is
>>powered down, and the drive is unplugged from the power supply... you
>>don't want it to short out if some moister sprays from the can. To avoid
>>moisture, hold the can upright, and spray in half second bursts.
>>
>>You can also get some of those "drive cleaning discs" that you insert
>>and run with the software for a specified period of time... but I'm not
>>sure how well these work, as I don't think the lens actually comes into
>>contact with the disc.
>>
>>Rainman

>
> The moisture that comes out of a can of air won't hurt the drive. If it
> were water it probably would but what is in those cans isn't water it's the
> propellant. It's a non-issue. If you are using compressed air from a tank
> or compressor then there is a good chance of condensation in the air. That
> could be a bad thing but most good compressors have a moisture bleed off
> valve to get rid of it.
>
> AG


Actually, any liquid with electrolytes can damage an electronic
component, if it is powered up. The electrolytes can be found in the
dust, and can be dissolved into the moisture upon impact, instantly
causing a short circuit through the moisture.

In addition, the moisture that comes out of a can is much much colder
than the air itself, and while this initial moisture evaporates quickly,
it can cause the air around it to rapidly cool and condense the water
vapor in the air, and this new moisture evaporates much more slowly, and
can cause damage.

Although the likelihood of damaging the system with a can of compressed
air is extremely slim, it's best to practice safe precautions, and
unpower the device, and hold the can upright in short bursts.

Rainman
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Pat
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      07-17-2005
JohnO wrote:
>>In my opinion, the problem is most likely due to (in this order): dirty
>>drive (clean it), overworked or failing power supply, bad cables, or
>>faulty IDE controller (you didn't specify, but I assume it's an IDE
>>drive).
>>

>
>
> A drive not appearing in BIOS or on a list of drives is a logic problem, not
> dust or dirt. You could pour mud in the drive and the BIOS will still see
> its controller.
>
> For some reason the mobo drive controller is not seeing the drive, and thus
> not seeing the info needed to make it active, reliably. I think the order of
> attack is:
>
> Connections (loose or broken data cable, or cable select with an old 40-pin
> cable)
> Configuration (master/slave jumper)
> Bad drive
>
> Try the drive on the IDE channel all by itself, and make sure the cable is
> 80 pins and that it works.


I don't know of any optical drive that requires an 80 pin cable.
 
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rainman
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      07-17-2005
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AG wrote:
> "rainman" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>>Hash: SHA1
>>
>>
>>>>The moisture that comes out of a can of air won't hurt the drive. If it
>>>
>>>were water it probably would but what is in those cans isn't water it's
>>>the
>>>propellant. It's a non-issue. If you are using compressed air from a
>>>tank
>>>or compressor then there is a good chance of condensation in the air.
>>>That
>>>could be a bad thing but most good compressors have a moisture bleed off
>>>valve to get rid of it.
>>>
>>>AG

>>
>>Actually, any liquid with electrolytes can damage an electronic
>>component, if it is powered up. The electrolytes can be found in the
>>dust, and can be dissolved into the moisture upon impact, instantly
>>causing a short circuit through the moisture.
>>
>>In addition, the moisture that comes out of a can is much much colder
>>than the air itself, and while this initial moisture evaporates quickly,
>>it can cause the air around it to rapidly cool and condense the water
>>vapor in the air, and this new moisture evaporates much more slowly, and
>>can cause damage.
>>
>>Although the likelihood of damaging the system with a can of compressed
>>air is extremely slim, it's best to practice safe precautions, and
>>unpower the device, and hold the can upright in short bursts.
>>
>>Rainman

>
> It's not water. It's propellant. It will not stay liquid long enough to
> dissolve anything.
>
> AG
>
>


I never said it was water. In fact, I pointed out *several* ways it
could damage your system. Any liquid can dissolve electrolytes. And in
fact, when the contents of the can come out as air, it has evaporated
quickly enough not to dissolve anything. However, when the contents come
out as liquid (ie. holding the can upside-down), it can take several
seconds to evaporate completely, plenty of time to dissolve electrolytes
and a short to occur if there is power to the system.

Here's another fact:
The can of air I have in front of me consists of highly compressed
petroleum hydrocarbons, which is still capable of dissolving
electrolytes. Not only that, many petroleum hydrocarbons are corrosive
in themselves (think: paint thinner).

Again: while the chances of damaging your system with canned air are
extremely unlikely, it's still best to take precautions just in case. If
you disagree with me, then feel free to hold a can upside-down over your
brand new P4EE while powered up and spray continuously.

Rainman
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